Recipe Spotlight: Bloody Marys with Responsible Choice Shrimp

Shrimp are a popular item among Hy-Vee customers, but many of them haven’t thought to use shrimp in a delicious beverage. It’s the season of football and fall, and this recipe is the perfect addition to your tailgating parties. Impress the visitors to your tailgate and be sure to let them know you used Responsible Choice 100% Natural Farm Raised Belize EZ-Peel Shrimp.


Bloody Mary Mix featuring Responsible Choice 100% Natural EZ-Peel Shrimp

Bloody MaryAll you need:

  • 1 (46 oz) can Hy-Vee vegetable juice
  • 2 oz olive juice
  • 4 oz Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tbsp sriracha
  • 1 1/2 oz lemon juice
  • 3/4 tsp black pepper
  • 3 tbsp steak sauce
  • 1 1/2 tsp celery salt

All you do:

  1. Whisk all ingredients together in a large bowl. Add vodka if you would like to make an alcoholic beverage.

For the shrimp:

Fill a large pot with enough water to cover the shrimp completely. Bring to a boil on high heat, then add the shrimp. Let the shrimp cook for about 3 to 5 minutes until they turn pink. Take off heat and run shrimp under cold water. When cooled, peel the shrimp and skewer 5 or 6 of them on a kabob stick to enjoy with your Bloody Mary.

Note: The shrimp can also be served by itself with the non-alcoholic Bloody Mary mix for the dipping sauce.

Recipe Spotlight: Autumn “Cioppino”

Cioppino is a fish stew originating in San Francisco, California. It is a rich, hearty, Italian broth-based stew that features seafood—in this case, clams, mussels, crabmeat shrimp, salmon and Responsible Choice mahi mahi,. For this recipe, I adapted the cioppino to fit the autumn season by adding several seasonal root vegetables. Enjoy this dish with family and friends, as it’s perfect for a cool fall night and pairs wonderfully with the crusty artisan breads available in our Hy-Vee bakery.


Autumn “Cioppino”

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 large fennel bulb, thinly sliced
  • 2 cups diced butternut squash
  • 1 large carrot, diced
  • 1 stalk celery, diced
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 3 large shallots, chopped
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 4 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 3/4 tsp dried crushed red pepper flakes, plus more to taste
  • 1/4 cup tomato paste
  • 1 (28 oz) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes in juice
  • 1 1/2 cups dry white wine
  • 3 cups fish stock
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 thyme sprig
  • 1 pound littleneck clams, scrubbed
  • 1 pound mussels, scrubbed, debearded
  • 1 1/2 cups crabmeat
  • 1 pound uncooked 16- to 20-ct. wild Gulf shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1/2 pound fresh farmed raised Scottish salmon filets, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 1/2 pound Responsible Choice previously frozen mahi mahi filets, cut into 2-inch chunks

All you do:

  1. Heat the olive oil in a very large pot over medium heat. Add the fennel, butternut squash, carrot, celery, onion and shallots and sauté until the onion is translucent, about 10 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Add the garlic and 3/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes and sauté 2 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste. Add tomatoes with their juices, wine, fish stock, vegetable stock, bay leaf and thyme sprig. Cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until the flavors blend and squash is tender, about 30 minutes.
  2. Add the clams and mussels to the cooking liquid. Cover and cook until the clams and mussels begin to open, about 5 minutes. Add the crab, shrimp, salmon and mahi mahi. Simmer gently until the fish and shrimp are just cooked through, and the clams are completely open, stirring gently, about 5 minutes longer (discard any clams and mussels that do not open). Season the soup, to taste, with more salt and black pepper. Remove the bay leaf.
  3. Ladle the soup into bowls and serve with crusty artisan baguette bread.

Recipe Spotlight: Belize Shrimp Tapa with Plantain, Guacamole and Tropical Salsa

As the weather is getting cooler, try warming up with this Caribbean-inspired tapa! The naturally sweet flavor of these Responsible Choice shrimp from Belize don’t need a lot of flavors added. This recipe brings out the natural flavor of the shrimp by using regional flavors of the Caribbean—“What grows together, goes together.”

A 6-ounce portion of shrimp is a great source of high-quality, lean protein and is low-calorie. Shrimp provides 39 grams of protein and contains all of the amino acids that your cells can’t synthesize on their own. By adding shrimp to your diet, you boost your intake of zinc and selenium, which activates the enzymes to help fight cancer growth.

Avocado has great health benefits, too. Half of an avocado contains 7 grams of monounsaturated fat and 1.5 grams of polyunsaturated fat, which are heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Avocados also contain fiber, vitamin C, vitamin K, vitamin B6, folate and potassium.

Plantains are related to a banana, but are a vegetable and should never be eaten raw. Plantains contain fiber, beta-carotene, calcium and vitamin k.

Try Modelo Especial from Mexico or a nice crisp Albarino from Spain, to enjoy alongside of this tapa.


Belize Shrimp with Plantain, Guacamole and Tropical Salsa

All you need:

  • Olive oil, as needed
  • 3 plantains, sliced into 1-inch rounds (about 20 pieces)
  • Salt, to taste
  • 1 pound raw, E-Z peel Belize shrimp, shells removed
  • Prepared Guacamole, recipe follows
  • Prepared Tropical Salsa, recipe follows

All you do:

  1. In a sauté pan, heat a little olive oil over medium-high heat. Place the cut plantains in the hot oil and brown on both sides. This should take about 4 minutes, but you might have to do this in batches. Remove plantains to a cutting board and cover with parchment or waxed paper.
  2. With a heavy pan, carefully mash the plantains to flatten them slightly. Return to pan and cook again until crisp. Remove from pan and season with a little salt. Keep warm in low oven.

For the shrimp:

  1. In the same pan, add a little olive oil and sauté the shrimp in batches. They will turn bright pink. It should only take about 2 minutes; don’t overcook or the shrimp will be rubbery.

To assemble to tapa:

  1. Spread a thin layer of the guacamole on the plantain, top with one shrimp and garnish with the Tropical Salsa.

Chef Jess’s Guacamole

All you need:

  • 1/4 cup small-diced red onions
  • 4 large Roma tomatoes, seeded and cut in small dice (use more if tomatoes are small)
  • 2 tbsp minced cilantro
  • 1 fresh lime, juiced
  • 1 tbsp chopped garlic
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 avocados, cut in small dice

All you do:

  1. In a large bowl, add the chopped onion, tomatoes, cilantro, lime juice, garlic and salt. Fold in the avocado. Mash to the consistency that you like.

Tropical Salsa

All you need:

  • 1 cup diced fresh pineapple
  • 2 mangos, diced
  • Half a red bell pepper, cut in small dice
  • Half a small red onion, cut in small dice
  • 3 tbsp chopped cilantro leaves
  • 3 tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • 1 to 2 jalapenos, or to taste, chopped
  • 1 to 2 limes, juiced
  • 1 to 2 tsp cumin, optional
  • 1 to 2 tsp cayenne pepper, optional
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Add pineapple, mango, red pepper, red onion, cilantro and mint to a bowl. Squeeze the lime juice on top; stir. Season with the cumin, cayenne, salt and pepper to taste; mix in.

Belize Shrimp is Not Your Ordinary Farmed Shrimp

Responsible Choice Belize shrimp are produced from one of the most environmentally advanced eco-aquaculture systems in the world. As the name suggests, the farms are located in Belize and the physical location and the production method provide the ideal environment for shrimp farming – perfect weather, nutritious water and farmers who care for the product.

The ponds in which these shrimp are raised contain ocean seawater which is pumped directly from the Caribbean Sea. Belize Aquaculture has a “Best Aquaculture Practices” or “BAP” 3 star rating, which is one step from the highest rating. This has been achieved in part thanks to advanced education and training, and has helped to raise industry standards in minimizing the impact on coastal waters and wildlife.

The shrimp have a sweet and succulent taste unique to only them, a characteristic resulting from their diet. They have are no additives or preservatives, including no added water. These shrimp are just how they should be—“fresh out of the water.” In addition, the processing facility is only 10 minutes away from the farm, which is much closer than the industry standard of four to 12 hours. The combination of the production and processing standards means that you won’t find anything more natural or fresh than this shrimp.

Belize shrimp cook in half the time as typical shrimp (only one to two minutes) due to the nature of their freshly harvested properties. When cooked, they turn a vibrant red color, darker than others you may have seen. Simply use your favorite recipe and enjoy some of the best-tasting shrimp in the world, easily purchased at your local Hy-Vee store. As a part of Hy-Vee’s commitment to sustainable seafood and our Responsible Choice initiative, we are excited to introduce Belize shrimp to our customers and into our seafood cases.

I have tried several different kinds of shrimp of the years. This is truly the best shrimp I have ever had. It is like eating candy, only better!

Belize Shrimp

Hy-Vee Supports Fishery Improvements in the Gulf of Mexico and Indonesia, Honors Commitment to Responsible Choice Initiative

In a market where consumers are concerned about their food supply – where their food is sourced, the environmental impact and overall quality – Hy-Vee has taken significant strides to improve upon each aspect. As part of Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood initiative, Hy-Vee is supporting various fishery improvement projects (FIPs) to improve management practices, sustainability and traceability efforts.

What is a FIP? Let’s take a closer look. As defined by the Conservation Alliance for Seafood Solutions, a network of organizations to which my organization FishWise belongs, a FIP is a multi-stakeholder effort to improve a fishery that draws upon market forces. Other components for a successful FIP include a work plan and budget, buy-in from stakeholders to make changes and provide funding, and a system in place to monitor progress. Several goals may be established as part of the improvement project. From funding for improved, sustainable gear to increased data collection and certification, retailers can support FIPs in different ways.

Ultimately, Hy-Vee’s goal in supporting FIPs is to ensure each fishery utilizes environmentally friendly practices and provides a safe, quality product for its customers. Hy-Vee wants to be proactive in raising the performance of all the fisheries they source from to meet their Responsible Choice standard for seafood.

Gulf of Mexico Shrimp FIPs
With ninety percent of Gulf shrimp consumed in the United States, the U.S. shrimp industry in the Gulf of Mexico initiated FIPs to ensure it minimized its impact on the environment. Currently, two FIPs are underway in U.S. waters off the coast of Texas and Louisiana for wild-caught brown and white shrimp. Both at Stage 5, creating improvements on the water, each FIP has separate goals.

The Texas Shrimp FIP has two goals: one, to reduce bycatch of non-target species, which can be very high in wild shrimp fisheries; and two, to enforce regulations mandating the use of turtle excluder devices on shrimp trawls. Each goal focuses on improvements for an environmentally conscious catch.

Goals of the Louisiana Shrimp FIP are to create a state Fishery Management Plan and publicize data on bycatch from shrimp trawls and regulations compliance. This type of transparency and responsible management is exactly what Hy-Vee is looking for when considering a supplier.

As part of its commitment to responsibly sourced seafood, Hy-Vee is supporting the improvement projects and sending a strong message to consumers by only purchasing Gulf of Mexico shrimp from supplier Paul Piazza, one of the companies leading FIP activities in both Texas and Louisiana.

Indonesia Snapper and Grouper FIP
Located in the Arafura, Aru and Timor Seas in Indonesia, the Snapper and Grouper FIP is a Stage 3, encouraging improvements in the fishery. The project has three main goals, including support of research to define stock status of Indonesian snapper and promote availability of accurate data; promote traceability to ensure knowledge of origin; and improve overall management of the fishery to encourage sustainable snapper and grouper fishing.

The group of seafood companies executing the FIP recently updated the work plan to indicate progress toward improving the understanding of the species being fished, and promoting legal and responsible fishing methods. This type of commitment and progress is essential for Hy-Vee to continue toward a sustainable future.

As part of the Responsible Choice seafood initiative, Hy-Vee is supporting the Indonesian Snapper and Grouper FIP by only purchasing Malabar snapper from North Atlantic, a supplier heavily involved in the improvement project.

By showing support of suppliers actively participating in FIPs, Hy-Vee is acknowledging and rewarding these organizations for their continuous improvements in sustainability, traceability and environmental stewardship. Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood initiative is more than an idea; it is a promise to customers. Hy-Vee’s commitment is executed through each purchasing decision and reflects the standards set within the Responsible Choice initiative.

Recipe Spotlight: Versatile Alaska Crab is Good in Light Summer-Time Fare & Hearty Fall Boils

During the transition from summer to fall, what to eat can be as confusing as what to wear. Jacket or short sleeve shirt? Hearty soup or lighter fare?

Here are two recipes using Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Alaska crab to get you through the in-between season. One is light and fresh; the other is a hearty boil that uses of end-of-harvest sweet corn, potatoes and onions.


Alaskan Crab Lettuce Wraps

Makes 8 lettuce wraps.

All you need:

Dressing:

  • 1 tbsp diced shallot
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Salad:

  • 1 pound cooked crab meat, diced
  • 1 avocado, pitted, peeled and diced
  • 1 mango, peeled and small diced
  • 2 stalks celery, small diced
  • 1/4 cup small diced red bell pepper
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 8 Bibb lettuce leaves from 1 head

All you do:

  1. Whisk shallot, lemon juice, lime juice, olive oil and cilantro together in a bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  2. Combine crab meat, avocado, mango, celery, red bell pepper and green onions in another bowl.
  3. Pour just enough dressing over the salad ingredients to lightly coat. Toss gently.
  4. Place 2 tablespoons salad onto each lettuce leaf and roll in wraps. Serve immediately.

Louisiana Style Shrimp and Crab Boil

Serves 6 to 8.

All you need:

  • 4 gallons water
  • 2 heads garlic, unpeeled
  • 5 fresh bay leaves
  • 9 oz Zatarain’s dry crab boil
  • 2 tbsp Zatarain’s liquid shrimp and crab boil
  • 2 (12 oz each) bottles Baraboo Pale Ale
  • 2 large oranges, halved
  • 3 large lemons, halved
  • 1 1/2 pounds baby red potatoes, washed
  • 1 1/2 pounds baby Yukon gold potatoes, washed
  • 1 pound Andouille sausage, sliced on the bias every 2 inches
  • 15 (3-inch) sections fresh sweet corn
  • 2 large onions, sliced
  • 2 pounds crawfish, thawed
  • 1 pound Jonah crab claws, thawed
  • 1 pound Alaska king crab claws, thawed
  • 2 pounds Gulf shrimp, thawed
  • Sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper, to taste
  • Lemon wedges and cocktail sauce, for serving

All you do:

  1. Heat in a 10-gallon stockpot over high heat.
  2. Add garlic, bay leaves, dry crab boil, liquid crab boil, beer, oranges and lemons. Cover and bring to a boil.
  3. Add potatoes; cover and boil 10 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat about 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Add sausage, sweet corn and onions to stockpot; cover and boil for 5 minutes.
  5. Add crawfish, crab claws and shrimp; boil for 2 to 3 minutes or until shrimp are pink. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  6. Transfer all ingredients to an oversize platter or large baking sheet and serve with lemon wedges and cocktail sauce, if desired.

Supplier Spotlight: Belize Shrimp is the Perfect Combination of Responsible Choice and Delicious

As this blog can attest, we at Hy-Vee are serious about promoting healthy oceans and ensuring the long-term viability of the seafood supply—both in the United States and abroad. As a part of this commitment and our Responsible Choice initiative, we are excited to introduce Belize shrimp to our customers and into our seafood cases.

Produced by Belize Aquaculture Ltd. from one of the most environmentally advanced eco-aquaculture systems in the world, this white leg shrimp is farmed in ponds that contain water pumped daily from the Caribbean Sea—making it famously known as being “fresh out of the water.” The physical location and the production method provide the ideal environment for shrimp farming – perfect weather, rich coastlines and nutritious water.

Fisheries and farms around the globe are facing challenges in creating and implementing sustainable practices and environments. Belize and Belize Aquaculture Ltd. are ahead of the curve in properly managing their shrimp and their production environment. Belize Aquaculture is a “Best Aquaculture Practices” or “BAP” 3 star, which is one step from the highest rating. This has been achieved in part thanks to advanced education and training, and has helped to raise the industry standards in minimizing the impact on coastal waters and wildlife. Education also helps farmers to keep the shrimp robust and pure while producing less waste and contamination.

Now, let’s talk about the delicious, savory taste of these shrimp. Because these shrimp are raised on a special diet, they are uniquely sweet and succulent. They have a firm bite, giving many customers the shrimp flavor profile they desire. Due to Belize Aquaculture Ltd.’s practices, there are no additives or preservatives, no antibiotics, no hormones and no chemicals used in the production of this shrimp. In addition, the processing facility is a mere 10 minutes away from the farm—much closer than the industry standard of four to 12 hours. The combination of the production and processing standards means that you won’t find anything more natural or fresh than this shrimp.

And, it’s easy to prepare in a variety of ways. Boil it, sauté it or grill it and serve with classic cocktail sauce, or use Old Bay seasoning and butter for a little extra flavoring. Due to the freshness and quick processing time, this shrimp cooks in half the time as normal shrimp which helps on those busy summer nights when dinner needs to be made quickly. Be aware of the vibrant and dark red coloring the shrimp will possess when ready; it’s imperative to not overcook them. Our seafood counter experts or in-store chefs will be able to provide you with cooking suggestions and a recipe if you’d like, but no matter how you prepare them you can be confident that you are dining on one of the world’s best-tasting shrimp.

Recipe Spotlight: Feature Responsible Choice Seafood at Your End-of-the-Summer Blowout

Summer is slipping away and soon the kids will be back in school or leaving to return to their college dorms.

If you want to close out the season with a luau or other end-of-summer party, this is a good and quick recipe featuring Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood.

It starts with Belize shrimp, but you can also switch out the shrimp and marinate fresh mahi mahi as well.


Coconut Lime Belize Shrimp Skewers

All you need:

  • 1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp freshly grated lime zest
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 (14 oz) can coconut milk
  • 2 pounds Responsible Choice Belize shrimp (31- to 40-ct), peeled and deveined
  • 12 to 14 long wooden skewers
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • fresh lime wedges, for squeezing and garnish
  • 1/2 cup toasted, sweetened shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves

All you do:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine ginger, garlic, lime zest and juice, and coconut milk. Add shrimp, tossing to coat, and chill, covered, for 1 to 3 hours.
  2. Meanwhile, soak skewers in water. Prepare a grill for high heat (450 to 550 degrees; you can hold your hand 5 inches above cooking grate only 2 to 4 seconds). Push 5 shrimp onto each skewer; cook, turning once, until flesh has just turned pink and is slightly charred, about 3 minutes on each side.
  3. Arrange skewers on a serving platter and sprinkle evenly with salt, a squeeze of lime juice, coconut and cilantro leaves. Serve with extra lime wedges on the side.

Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood Species Come from the U.S. Side of the Gulf of Mexico, Where Fisheries are Well Managed

John Rohrs here:

When Hy-Vee customers buy Responsible Choice seafood from the Gulf of Mexico, it’s predominantly from the U.S. side, where fisheries maintain quota systems and meet Monterey Bay Aquarium’s criterion for management.

One of the biggest factors affecting fin fish from the Gulf is sport fishing. Sportsmen and women are required to buy licenses, but it still has a huge effect on stocks. Between a combination of commercial fishing and recreational fishing, there is a great pressure on fin fish.

Some of the species customers will get from the Gulf include fish from the grouper family. We also bring in some American red snapper, but years of overfishing – it’s also one of the top species for sport fishing – make it a work in progress. It’s a long-living, late-maturing fish, so it will take time for stocks to rebound.

Kathleen Mullen-Ley here:

Hy-Vee’s wild shrimp also comes from Gulf of Mexico and meets the commitment to responsibly source all seafood by the end of 2015 because the species is in a comprehensive fishery improvement project.

Here’s the problem:
Many commercial fishing boats are complying with federal law that requires the use of turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in federal and state waters, but Louisiana has a state law that prohibits enforcement of the federal law.

All of the shrimp caught in the Gulf is processed together, meaning the shrimp caught in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida is commingled with the shrimp caught in Louisiana. So because that Louisiana law is on the books, we can’t say Gulf wild shrimp is Responsible Choice, even though many fisheries are using TEDs.

Legislative efforts are continuing to bring everyone into compliance and end the political power struggle.

Recipe Spotlight: Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Shrimp Tacos with Corn Salsa

Sweet corn and summer are synonymous. It’s in such abundance this year that you’ve probably boiled it, microwaved it and grilled it.

If you and your family are looking for a way to enjoy the iconic taste of summer and Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood, this recipe gets you to your goal.

It is a simple and refreshing recipe that brings out the fresh taste of sweet corn, and some of summer’s other garden bounties. This would be a great recipe if you have any sweet corn left over from a grill-out the night before.

These tacos are not spicy, but the shrimp have some nice bold flavors to contrast with the simple fresh ingredients of the salsa.


Shrimp Tacos with Corn Salsa

Serves 4.

All you need:

Corn Salsa

  • 2 ears sweet corn
  • 1/2 cup diced red pepper
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled, pitted, diced
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin

Shrimp Tacos

  • 1 pound raw Hy-Vee Responsible Choice shrimp (16- to 20-count)
  • 1 tbsp agave nectar
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp cumin
  • 8 flour taco shells

All you do:

  1. To cook the corn, place in boiling water for 5 to 7 minutes. Cool; cut the kernels from the cob. To prepare the salsa, place the corn, red pepper, green onion, avocado, lime juice, salt, black pepper and cumin in a medium bowl and mix until all incorporated. Set aside in refrigerator.
  2. To prepare the shrimp, thaw, peel and devein shrimp. In a large skillet add the shrimp, agave nectar, paprika, salt, chili powder and cumin; stir to evenly distribute seasonings. Cook shrimp for about 1 to 3 minutes on each side, until shrimp is opaque. Remove from heat.
  3. To prepare the taco, place 3 to 4 shrimp on each taco shell. Add about 1/4 cup corn salsa on top.