Live Smarter And Heathier With Seafood

Fish provides essential health for everyone in the family.

Here are some excellent reasons to celebrate National Seafood Month:

  1. LIVE (HEALTHIER) LONGER: Fish literally saves lives. Eating seafood two to three times per week reduces the risk of death from any health-related cause by 17 percent. Seven out of 10 deaths in the U.S. are preventable through nutrition and lifestyle changes, like adding omega-3s to your diet. Low seafood intake contributes to 55,000 deaths each year, making seafood deficiency a leading dietary contributor to preventable death in the U.S. Older adults with highest fish consumption lived an average of 2.2 years longer.
  2. SEAFOOD IS A “PROTEIN WITH BENEFITS:” Seafood sits among the highest-quality proteins (like eggs, meats, poultry and dairy) and offers additional health benefits. It can reduce your risk of heart disease, improve how you feel during pregnancy and help your child develop a healthy brain and eyes, and improve memory and sharpness. As a “protein with benefits,” leading health organizations recommend Americans eat seafood at least twice a week.
  1. SEAFOOD IS BRAIN FOOD: “As calcium is to the bones, DHA is to the brain,” says Dr. Tom Brenna, member of the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. Seafood provides docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a type of omega-3 essential for brain development and function, helping neurons trigger and cells regenerate. It is such an important building block that people with low levels of it have measurably smaller brains! The FDA and EPA agree seafood consumption is especially important for pregnant or nursing women because eating fish regularly helps with the growth and development of children’s brains and even helps boost IQ. Babies from moms who ate seafood twice a week had a higher IQ averaging 5.8 points. People who regularly eat fish are 20% less likely than their peers to have depression.7 In fact, the American Psychiatric Association has endorsed the fatty acids in fish as an effective part of depression treatment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources cited at seafoodnutrition.org