Three Kinds of Seasonal Salmon and Why We Love Them So Much

You may have heard of Copper River wild salmon; after all, many consider it the best. Copper River salmon include coho, sockeye, and king—all of which pack on sufficient fat reserves to make an epic journey through the waters of south-central Alaska’s Copper River. Learn the difference among these mighty fish and get cooking with our Best Salmon Recipes.

In September, our country celebrates National Family Meals Month™ — a nationwide event designed to support families in enjoying more meals together using items purchased at the grocery store and, as a result, reap the many health and social benefits of doing so.

Salmon is a wonderful main dish to gather the family around. Stop at your local Hy-Vee seafood counter to learn even more about salmon and how to prepare it in a way your family is sure to love.

 

  1. Copper River King Salmon: Prized for its high oil content and rich flavor, King salmon (also called Chinook) will literally melt in your mouth. It’s the largest of the three species and typically runs May and June.
  2. Copper River Sockeye Salmon: Known for its natural deep red flesh, sockeye (also known as Red salmon) has a robust flavor and firm texture, making it suitable for a variety of cooking methods. Sockeye salmon are typically caught May through July.
  3. Copper River Coho Salmon: Coho salmon, sometimes called Silvers, are the last to return to the Copper River. They’re known for a mild but delicate texture that goes well on top of salad greens or rice. Look for this late-season wild salmon in August and September.

Trust But Verify: Hy-Vee Deepens Relationships with Suppliers on Sustainable Tuna Commitments

Providing customers with sustainable seafood has long been a priority of Hy-Vee, rooted in a commitment to protect ocean resources. Our Seafood Procurement Policy goes beyond the traditional idea of environmental sustainability, including commitments aimed at improving traceability and social responsibility in seafood supply chains. Most recently, we expanded our policy to include best practices for at-sea transshipment of tuna.

Since adding at-sea transshipment, Hy-Vee has been hard at work putting the policy into practice. First, we expanded our annual vendor survey, from where our seafoods are harvested, to include questions about the occurrence of at-sea transshipment in tuna supply chains. After understanding where transshipment is taking place, Hy-Vee takes a deeper dive into a tuna supply chain to confirm the accuracy of reported seafood data and to ensure compliance with our Seafood Procurement Policy.

To put this verification into practice, Hy-Vee partnered with Chicken of the Sea and sustainability advisor FishWise, to track a canned tuna product from harvest to Hy-Vee’s shelves. To better understand Chicken of the Sea’s efforts and ability to meet our at-sea transshipment policy, we looked at the supply chain documentation available for key topics:

  • Electronic monitoring and observer coverage
  • Legality of at-sea transshipment events via supporting documentation referencing authorization to transship in high seas waters
  • Worker protections, including vessel and crew safety, on vessels associated with transshipment events

Best practices for monitoring at-sea transshipment, and reducing its associated risks, include understanding where it happens, how it is reported, and who observes the event. Chicken of the Sea provided detailed harvest-level information demonstrating that they prioritize purchasing tuna from fishing vessels with legal government registrations and electronic reporting procedures. Catch documentation also shows observer coverage for all transshipment events and include information about when and where the activity was taking place, adding confidence around the legality of the transshipment event.

Thai Union, owner and operator of Chicken of the Sea, provides publicly available information regarding its vessel code of conduct in support of human rights and worker protections. Through this deep dive, Chicken of the Sea shared additional assurance that the company purchased tuna from fishing vessels that adhere to those standards – specifically regarding worker time spent at sea – through records of fishing trip dates.

Hy-Vee has strong relationships with its seafood suppliers grounded in collaboration and trust. Relationships that are made stronger by working together to ensure sustainable, transparent supply chains. Chicken of the Sea’s dedication to support traceable and legal seafood through its numerous tuna policies and commitments made them an ideal supplier to work with. Chicken of the Sea’s ability to meet the best practices laid out in Hy-Vee’s policy demonstrates the progress that’s been made on tuna sustainability and sets a precedent for other tuna suppliers to follow suit.

Tuna Advocacy: Hy-Vee Dives Deeper

Tuna is the second most popular seafood in the United States, right up there with shrimp and salmon. Given how many different delicious ways there are to serve it up, it’s no wonder we love it so much!

Hy-Vee is proud of its industry leading sourcing guidelines and continued efforts to offer Responsible Choice and Fair Trade tuna products. We also understand the importance of advocating for better policy and management of fisheries far before that seafood begins its journey through the supply chain to your plate.

Providing responsibly sourced seafood to our customers requires a multi-faceted approach that has Hy-Vee working behind the scenes to support strong policy and management of global fisheries. Sometimes, that means going to bat for fisheries reform. Many of the world’s tuna fisheries are experiencing pressure from overfishing, lack great monitoring, and require cooperation from multiple countries to adopt sustainable, and ethical, management practices. What fisheries managers can’t monitor or track on the water creates risks to fish stocks, the ocean and to the seafood companies that purchase tuna.

This year, Hy-Vee was one of 143 companies to sign on to a Global Tuna Sustainability Appeal letter to the world’s Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) advocating for better tuna management. RFMOs are in charge of implementing and enforcing tuna harvest strategies on the high seas. RFMOs have the power to reduce risks of illegal fishing practices by requiring 100% observer coverage to improve transparency and stronger guidelines for tuna fishing fleets. Retailer and industry participation in advocacy issues, such as these, sends a message that demand for responsible tuna is strong and encourages RFMOs to adopt better practices.

You can find additional information on our advocacy commitments in the Seafood Procurement Policy and on our Responsible Choice webpage under Conservation Initiatives.

Barbecue Shrimp

Join us for an in-store demo this week or make these simple, delicious barbecue shrimp on your grill at home!

All you need:

1 pound jumbo shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 tbsp Emeril’s Essence
2 tsp Hy-Vee Select lemon-flavored olive oil

All you do:

  1. Soak 4 bamboo skewers in water for at least 30 minutes. Drain and set aside.
  2. Preheat grill to medium.
  3. Toss together shrimp, Essence and lemon olive oil in a medium bowl. Thread 3 or 4 shrimp onto each skewer leaving space between each shrimp.
  4. Place on grill rack. Cook for 3 minutes. Turn and cook for an additional 3 minutes or until shrimp is pink and firm.