Wild Alaska Crab

 

 

All Alaska crab sold by Hy-Vee is labeled with our Responsible Choice logo because Alaska crab fisheries are some of the best-managed wild fisheries in the world.

In Alaska, crab is king. No other shellfish in the world offers such widespread appeal than Alaska King Crab. Harvested from the icy waters off Alaska, this shellfish is always sweet, succulent and flavorful. It is also nutritious, low in fat and is unmatched for its natural rich flavor and tender texture. The largest and most impressive of all the crabs caught in the world, Alaska King Crab lends itself to a variety of attractive plate presentations from appetizers, chowders and soups to main course entries.

Regal, royal and rich in flavor, Alaska king crabs come from some of the coldest waters and are among the finest of all crustaceans. What’s your favorite way to prepare them? Here is one of ours. #AskForAlaska

SERVES 8
PREP TIME 10 minutes
COOK TIME 10 minutes
INGREDIENTS

3 to 4 pounds Alaska Crab legs (King, Snow or Dungeness), thawed or frozen

Fill large sauté or fry pan to 1/2-inch depth with water; add crab legs and bring to boil; reduce heat, cover and simmer for 8 to 10 minutes for frozen crab or 3 to 4 minutes for thawed crab, until heated-through.  Drain and serve with dipping sauce of choice.

DIRECTIONS

Rouille Sauce:
1/3 cup bottled roasted red peppers
2 cloves minced garlic
2/3 cup low-fat mayonnaise
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Combine peppers and garlic in food processor and process until well minced. Pulse in remaining ingredients until well combined.

Basil-Mint Pesto Sauce:
2 cups fresh basil leaves
1-1/2 cups fresh mint leaves
1/2 cup olive oil
3 Tablespoons toasted walnuts
3 cloves garlic
3-1/2 teaspoons lemon juice
1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Combine basil, mint, oil, walnuts, garlic and lemon juice in a food processor; puree until smooth. Add Parmesan and pulse until well combined.

Variation: For a creamier sauce, combine 1/4 cup Basil-Mint Pesto sauce with 1/2 cup low-fat mayonnaise.

Mediterranean Dip:
1 jar (6.5 oz.) artichoke hearts, drained and chopped
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1 cup low-fat sour cream
1 cup low-fat mayonnaise
1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes (dehydrated or drained), chopped
1 can (4 oz.) sliced olives, drained
1/4 cup chopped fresh chives OR 2 Tablespoons sliced green onions

Blend artichoke hearts, Parmesan cheese, sour cream, mayonnaise, sun-dried tomatoes, olives, and chives in bowl.
Variation: Bake at 350ºF until bubbly.

Butter Sauce:
1/2 cup unsalted melted butter
1 Tablespoon lemon juice
3/4 teaspoon garlic salt
1/2 teaspoon dried dill weed
Dash white pepper

Blend ingredients together in a bowl.

Cook’s Tip: Dips can also be prepared up to two days in advance, reheating butter sauce as needed.

Virtual Dinner Party Menu: Butternut Squash With Shrimp

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

From Dish On Fish:

Greetings, Seafoodies!

This year we’ve gone virtual in many ways. Business meetings. School. Doctor visits. And we’re totally on board with this year’s virtual twist on the dinner party—sharing recipes with friends and then comparing tasting notes while catching up over a glass of wine! Entertaining sure is different this year, but social distancing doesn’t mean we need to stop sharing food and friendship, right?

This new recipe—Cheesy Butternut Squash Rice Bowl with Shrimp—is our recommendation for your next Virtual Dinner Party! It’s also seriously fun to put together. We are already huge fans of bowls—you could say we are bowled over by them—because they’re an easy way to pack nutrition into a satisfying, balanced meal. This bowl is especially satisfying (and Zoom-genic!) with succulent sautéed shrimp topping a hearty, no-stir butternut squash risotto that’s infused with garlic and herbs.

This recipe features heart-healthy, protein-rich shrimp, which has about 18 grams of protein in a 3-ounce serving and provides 50% of your daily selenium needs. Swapping brown for white rice ups the nutritional profile of this dish.

Ingredient alert: This recipe makes liberal use of grated parmesan. Do not skip! The salty parmesan nicely balances the sweetness of the squash and shrimp.

Here are a few more suggestions that will make your Virtual Dinner Party fun and successful. The week prior, ask someone to choose a wine that can be enjoyed with dinner. The day of, remind the group to have their ingredients prepped and ready to go so everyone is ready to cook. Add a fun element, like getting dressed for dinner or voting on the most unique tablescape! This bowl is so amazing, we’re sure you and your friends will want to make it again and again! We’d love to hear how your Virtual Dinner Party goes!

Cheesy Butternut Squash Rice Bowl

Recipe courtesy of Carrie Walder, MS, RD, Walder Wellness

Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes
Total time: 45 minutes
Servings: 2

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil (plus 1 teaspoon for shrimp)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 cups butternut squash, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 teaspoon rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 cup uncooked brown rice
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 20 medium-size shrimp (approximately 8 ounces)
  • 1 cup parmesan cheese, freshly grated
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Heat a large saucepan or pot over medium heat. Add olive oil and minced garlic. Sauté for 1 to 2 minutes until garlic starts to brown and become fragrant.
  2. Add cubed butternut squash, rosemary, thyme, salt and pepper to the saucepan. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently.
  3. Add brown rice and vegetable broth to the saucepan. Stir, bring to a boil, then cover and reduce heat. Allow to simmer for about 25 minutes, or until the liquid has absorbed.
  4. Meanwhile, pat shrimp dry with a paper towel and toss in 1 teaspoon of olive oil. Heat a pan to medium-high and cook shrimp 1 to 2 minutes on each side. To ensure adequate space between each shrimp, you may have to do this in batches. Set cooked shrimp aside in a clean bowl.
  5. Once the butternut squash-rice mixture has absorbed all of the liquid, stir in the freshly grated parmesan. Adjust seasonings to taste.
  6. Serve butternut squash rice into bowls and top with sautéed shrimp. Enjoy hot!

Oyster Stuffing For Your Thanksgiving Spread

Oyster Stuffing

White bowl filled with bread cubes, chopped cooked bacon, sliced celery, and oysters

New Englanders are on to something special. Adding oysters to Thanksgiving stuffing gives it an extra depth of flavor. It’s not strong or overpowering, just a nice background note.

Ingredients

Quantity Ingredient
1 lbs. Hy-Vee bacon, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 medium onions, finely chopped
1 ½ c. chopped celery
1 tbsp. finely chopped fresh sage or 2 tsp dried sage, crumbled
½ tsp. Hy-Vee salt
¼ tsp. Hy-Vee black pepper
2 (12 oz each) bags Pepperidge Farm stuffing
½ c. Hy-Vee unsalted butter, melted
2 (8 oz each) cans Chicken of the Sea oysters, drained
3 Hy-Vee large eggs, lightly beaten
1 ½ c. Hy-Vee chicken broth, plus additional if needed

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Butter a 3- to 3-1/2-quart shallow baking dish.
  2. In a large skillet, cook bacon pieces over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, about 10 minutes. Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain, reserving drippings in skillet.
  3. Add onions, celery, sage, salt and pepper in drippings in skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until vegetables soften, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer vegetables to a large bowl. Stir in stuffing, cooked bacon pieces, butter, oysters and eggs.
  4. Add chicken broth to stuffing mixture. Add additional broth, as necessary, if stuffing seems dry. Transfer to prepared dish.
  5. Bake stuffing, covered, 30 minutes. Uncover and continue to bake until browned, about 30 minutes more.

Seared Scallops with Angel Hair Pasta

The combination of garlic, wine, butter and prosciutto forms an incredible savory sauce that complements seared scallops perfectly.
Bowl of angel hair pasta topped with seared scallops, chopped prosciutto, grape tomatoes, mushrooms, garlic and spinach and garnished with fresh basil leaves

Servings, 10min Prep, 30min Total
 
Ingredients
Quantity Ingredient
10 oz. Hy-Vee angel hair pasta
1 tbsp. Hy-Vee Select olive oil
18 medium sea scallops, trimmed, about 8-oz.
 c. prosciutto, chopped
1 ½ c. grape tomatoes, sliced
8 oz. sliced mushrooms
1 tsp. fresh garlic, minced
½ c. dry white wine
¼ tsp. kosher salt
¼ tsp. Hy-Vee black pepper
¼ c. Hy-Vee unsalted butter
½ lbs. baby spinach
Fresh basil leaves, for garnish

Directions

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions. Drain and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, in a large skillet heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add scallops and cook for 3 to 4 minutes per side or until golden brown; transfer to a platter and set aside.

    Expert Tip

    It’s important to trim each scallop to reduce chewiness. To trim each scallop, pinch off the small rectangular tag of tissue on the side using your thumb and first finger.

    Hy-Vee Test Kitchen

  3. In same skillet, cook prosciutto for 2 minutes over medium heat. Add tomatoes, mushrooms and garlic; cook for 2 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add wine and simmer for 3 to 4 minutes or until liquid is reduced by half. Season with salt and pepper.
    5. Add butter and spinach. Cook until spinach is wilted, stirring often. Add scallops and pasta, tossing to thoroughly combine. If desired, garnish each serving with basil.

 

Perfect Salmon: 5 Foolproof Ways to Cook

A deliciously cooked piece of salmon is easy to achieve, even on a weeknight. Here are 5 foolproof techniques for preparing Bristol Bay Sockeye Salmon.


HOW TO TELL WHEN YOUR SALMON IS DONE:

  • Flesh should be pale orange and flaky on the outside with a bright orange opaque center.

  • The center of the salmon should be slightly translucent – the fish will continue to cook after you’ve removed it from the heat.

  • Put a fork in it! Insert a fork or knife into the thickest part of the salmon to test the color and flakiness.

  • Sockeye salmon is best served medium rare or with internal temperature of 110-120 F.

 

  1. Grilling:
    Grilling salmon is simple and adds great flavor to your fish.
    • Preheat grill to very hot
    • Pat the salmon dry and brush with oil on both sides. Season salmon with
    your favorite flavors, or keep it simple with salt and pepper.
    • Place salmon, skin-side down. Cook for 5-6 minutes, and flip. Cook 2-7
    more minutes or until done

2. Roasting:
If you’ve got an oven and a baking dish or sheet pan, then you’re all set to roast salmon!
• Preheat oven to 375 F.
• Line a baking dish with foil. Coat salmon with cooking oil on both sides and season to your liking.
• Place salmon skin-side down in baking dish and bake for 10-15 minutes or until done.
• Remove from oven and serve immediately.

3. Steaming:
Steaming salmon can help lock in flavors you wouldn’t be able to achieve with other methods of cooking.
• Find a pot that your steamer basket fits snugly on top of and fill halfway
with water. Bring water to a boil.
• Line steamer basket with parchment paper and place salmon in steamer.
Salt and pepper the salmon and add your favorite herbs and spices.
• Cover and place on top of the pot of boiling water. Steam for 7-10 minutes or until done

4. Pan Searing:
This is a good method for beginners. We recommend using a seasoned cast iron skillet, but any non-stick pan will do.
• Coat salmon on both sides with cooking oil
• Add enough cooking oil to coat the bottom of the pan and heat over
medium-high heat.
• Place salmon, skin side up, into pan and cook until browned, about 4
minutes.
• Carefully flip salmon and cook for another 3 minutes or until done.

5. Poaching:
This technique is similar to steaming, but doesn’t require any special tools. Add ingredients to the poaching water such as white wine, lemon, dill and garlic so the salmon gets a flavor boost during cooking.
• Season salmon on both sides with salt and pepper
• Fill a straight-sided pan one-third of the way with poaching liquid and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat
• Carefully place the salmon in the pan. Cover, reduce heat and gently
simmer the salmon for 7-9 minutes.

 

Find more delicious wild sockeye salmon recipes at www.bristolbaysockeye.org.

Honey-Sriracha Sockeye Salmon

There’s just something about the sweet and spicy pairing of honey and sriracha that we just love on top sockeye salmon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ingredients (Serves 4):

1 pound fresh sockeye salmon fillet (1/2 to 3/4 inch thick)
Hy-Vee salt
Hy-Vee pepper
1 1/2 tsp Hy-Vee salted butter
1 tbsp honey
1 tbsp Hy-Vee Sriracha
1 1/2 tsp fresh lime juice
1 1/2 tsp Hy-Vee less sodium soy sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
lime slices and cilantro leaves, for garnish

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Lind a large rimmed baking pan with foil. Spray foil with nonstick cooking spray.
  2. Pat salmon dry with paper towels. Place salmon, skin side down, on prepared pan. Season with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  3. Melt butter in small saucepan. Stir in honey, Sriracha, lime juice, soy sauce and garlic. Bring mixture to a boil; reduce heat. Cook for 2 to 3 minutes or until slightly thickened.
  4. Brush glaze on salmon. Bake 5 to 10 minutes or until fish flakes with a fork (145 degrees). Garnish with lime slices and cilantro, if desired.

Eat Seafood, America!

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO HELP SAVE AN INDUSTRY THAT EMPLOYS 2 MILLION AMERICANS.

The coronavirus poses a significant threat to the U.S. seafood economy. Support our fishing communities by eating delicious seafood.

 

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO HELP YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM AND STAY HEALTHY.

Seafood’s omega-3s reduce inflammation, support your immune health and can even help reduce stress and anxiety — all things we need right now during these times.

 

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES THROUGH THESE UNPRECEDENTED TIMES.

Purchase seafood from Hy-Vee to cook at home, or order from your favorite restaurants for delivery or pick-up.

Many fishermen and distributors have shifted to online deliveries to help get healthy seafood to Americans. Help support these local businesses.

 

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO TAKE YOUR TASTEBUDS ON VACATION.

Need an escape from your house?  Seafood can transport you to your favorite vacation memories!  Step 1: Make a festive meal, like fish tacos or crab cakes.   Step 2: Set the scene on the big screen – YouTube tranquil beach.  Step 3:  Pull up the coffee table and dig in!

 

Join the #EatSeafoodAmerica Movement.

Seasons Magazine: Maple-Scotch Salmon

Check out this delicious grilled salmon recipe from Hy-Vee’s most recent issue of Seasons magazine. Check out the latest issue online here or pick up a free copy at your local Hy-Vee store.

Maple-Scotch Salmon

Hands On: 30 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes
Serves: 4

1 (15×5-in) cedar grilling plank
1 (1-to 1 1/2 pound) wild skin-on salmon fillet, 1/3 to 3/4 inch thick
1 tbsp McCormick Grill Mates Maple BBQ rub
1/4 cup smoky Scotch whisky, such as Lagavulin single-malt scotch
1 tbsp packed Hy-Vee dark brown sugar
1 tbsp Hy-Vee salted butter, melted
Fresh chives, for garnish
Lemon wedges, for garnish

  1. Soak cedar plank in water for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, pat salmon dry with paper towels. Sprinkle salmon with maple BBQ rub; slightly pat into surface of salmon. Cover and refrigerate for 15 minutes.
  2. For sauce, combine syrup, whisky, brown sugar and butter; reserve half of sauce for serving.
  3. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill for direct cooking over medium-high heat. Toast plank on grill for 2 to 4 minutes or until slightly charred, turning once.
  4. Place salmon, skin side down, on cedar plank. Grill for 15 to 20 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork (145 degrees F), brushing with remaining half of the sauce after 10 minutes of grilling. Remove from grill. Brush or drizzle with reserved sauce. Garnish with chives and lemon wedges, if desired.

Seafood Swap

Have you considered a Seafood Swap on some of your favorite foods? Summer is a great time to use seafood swaps in burgers, tacos, pizzas, pastas, skewers, salads and more! Bonus: It’s good for our health and the planet’s health.

The Seafood Nutrition Partnership staff have always liked to experiment in the kitchen and try out new recipes, and we’re here to share some of our learnings. This is a great time to learn how to swap different ingredients into favorite dishes or even try a new recipe. Below, we’ll talk about ideas for swapping seafood into your family’s favorite foods, talk about how different species of seafood can be swapped into dishes, and also share some tips on how we are creatively using items from our pantry to make recipes work when we don’t have all the correct ingredients on hand.

Also, check out our blog post about using canned or frozen seafood and another about our favorite comfort foods with seafood.

Seafood Swaps

Seafood works for all of your family’s favorite foods – even comfort foods! Think fish and shellfish when making burgers, tacos, pizza, salad, sandwiches, and more!

Tacos: This is arguably the easiest place to add seafood. Any fish as well as shrimp, lobster and scallops are all perfect vehicles for taco seasoning. Here are a couple of our favorite recipes (and we have dozens of variations):

 

Burgers: There are several types of seafood-based burgers available at grocery stores across the country, including salmon, Alaska pollock, shrimp and mahi mahi. But, you can also make them at home! Any “cake” recipe – think crab cakes – can be sized up for a full-size burger or just make mini sliders!

 

 

Pizza: Though we’re a nutrition organization, we strongly believe there is a place in everyone’s diet for pizza! Seafood makes for a great pizza topper. Try some of our favorite combos:

 

What Seafood Should I Buy?

In our Ultimate Guide to Buying Seafood and Ultimate Guide to Cooking Seafood, we share a lot of information about utilizing different species of seafood, as well as offer tips to make the most of what you can find at the grocery store. This includes lists of fish that have similar qualities such as taste profiles and cooking techniques.

If you’re looking for:

  • A light, delicate fish. Choose a lean fish, such as barramundi, sea bass, cod, flounder, grouper, haddock, halibut, mahi mahi, perch, pollock, red snapper, rockfish, sole or yellowfin tuna. For shellfish, shrimp, crab and lobster are light and lean.
  • For a richer taste. Choose a fattier fish usually with darker flesh, such as herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines, swordfish, trout or albacore tuna. Several shellfish varieties fit in this rich category and offer delicious briny flavor, such as clams, mussels and oysters.

In terms of cooking style, if you want to:

  • Grill: Many fish stand up to the heat, and it can bring out a delicious smoky flavor. Pick a variety that is firmer in texture, such as catfish, mahi mahi, salmon, scallops, shrimp, snapper, swordfish or tuna. Many fish also are great on grilled skewers!
  • Steam or poach: Try lean fish – mild-flavored with tender, white or pale flesh – such as sea bass, cod, flounder, grouper, haddock, halibut or pollock.
  • Broil or bake: Try a medium-fat fish, such as bluefish, catfish, salmon or swordfish.
  • Eat it without having to cook it: Choose a precooked fish that’s frozen (so you just have to warm it up), or opt for canned tuna, salmon, sardines or crab.

White fish is generally the best example of these “species swaps.” White fish is simply a mild-flavored, often slightly-sweet fish, which can be interchangeable in recipes. These include wild Alaska pollock, bass, cod, grouper, haddock and halibut. There are also some thinner fillets of white fish, which can be used in these recipes but keep in mind they cook much faster, including flounder, perch and sole. Learn all about these white fish options in this blog post.

To sum it up: Let availability and freshness be your guides. It’s easy to substitute one fish for another in a recipe. Also, keep in mind the frozen and canned sections offer the same health benefits and often a wider variety to choose from.

Recipe Ingredients on Hand

If you’re not be able to find all the ingredients to try out a specific recipe and we’re here to offer some easy swaps for some popular ingredients. Some general tips:

  • Fruits and vegetables can swap in recipes. For example, if you want to make this Smoked Salmon and Kale Frittata recipe that calls for kale, try spinach or even frozen spinach, just make sure you wring out excess liquid. Keep in mind for baking, the liquid in a recipe can throw off the end texture or the baking time.
  • Acidic liquid ingredients such as lemon juice and vinegar can be swapped, just keep in mind the end flavor profile. It’s a great time to use those random bottles of vinegar at the back of your pantry!
  • We always recommend using a lot of herbs and spices for flavoring, and only add salt if needed. Experiment with different flavor combos using those dried herbs you bought for a specific recipe months ago. We’ve been playing around with different spices in our tuna and salmon salads and found curry is amazing paired in this staple! (Try this recipe.)

Here are some tips to use ingredients you have on hand for cooking fish dishes:

Recipe calls for: Try swapping:
Buttermilk Yogurt, or milk with a small amount of lemon juice or vinegar added
Bread crumbs Rolled oats, crushed cereal, or crushed crackers
Cream (half and half) For one cup, 7/8 cup milk plus 1 Tbsp. butter
Cream (heavy) For one cup, 3/4 cup milk plus 1/3 cup butter
Cream cheese pureed cottage cheese
Garlic (clove) One clove of garlic = 1/8 tsp. garlic powder
Herbs (fresh) 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh = 1 tsp. dried herbs
Lemon zest Approximately double the quantity of lemon juice
Mayonnaise Avocado, plain Greek yogurt, sour cream
Sour cream plain Greek yogurt
Wine Broth, fruit juice mixed with a splash of vinegar

Tips For Grilling Seafood

The month of June heralds the full return of my favorite culinary tool: the outdoor grill. The smoky charm of being cooked over a live fires flatters skin-on trout fillets; super fresh sides of bluefish; and whole, oily, omega-3 rich mackerel alike.

But the fragile texture of fish fillets and the misconception that fish skin sticks to the grates, make the prospect of grilling fish intimidating. But I’ve got an easy answer to both concerns:  use the indirect grilling method for cooking all types of seafood. This technique employs two different cooking areas on the grill; one directly above the high heat of hot coals and the other sitting opposite the coals, where indirect heat gently cooks the fish to completion.

To set up a charcoal grill for indirect grilling, use a coal chimney to light the charcoal and when hot coals are ready, place all of them on one side of the kettle. Arrange well-seasoned fish fillets, skin-side down on the grill directly over these hot coals so they lay, head-to-tail, parallel to the grates.

Sear the fillets over the high heat for two minutes. Then rotate the grill grate 180 degrees, so the fish sits on the side of the grill away from the hot coals. Cover the grill, and finish cooking the fillets via indirect heat, which will take another 8-10 minutes (the general rule being 10 minutes total cooking time per inch of thickness.)

For gas grills, simply preheat both sides of the grill on high. Lay the fish on the grates on one side of the grill and cook for two minutes. Turn off the burner under the fish, but keep the burners opposite the fish fired up, cover the grill, and finish cooking.

This method also works well for smaller, whole fish. You do need to flip the fish over before rotating the grill grate away from the hots coals and cover the grill to cook it completely.

This technique helps cooks get more healthy seafood on the table more often. Please take the Seafood Nutrition Partnership’s Pledge to Eat #Seafood2xWk as a positive commitment to eat the USDA’s recommendation of eating two servings of seafood per week. To take the pledge, go to www.seafoodnutrition.org/pledge.

Grilled Skin-on Fish Fillets with Marinated Citrus Salad
This recipe works well with all types of fish fillets including Alaskan pollock, barramundi, John Dory, red snapper, salmon and trout.

Ingredients

  • 2 oranges, peeled and segmented
  • 1 lemon, peeled and segmented
  • 1 serrano chile, very thinly sliced
  • 1 shallot, very thinly sliced
  • Salt
  • 4 skin-on fish fillets
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons good red wine vinegar

Directions

  • Combine orange and lemon segments, chile, shallot, and salt to taste in a colander. Let mixture sit while you cook the fish.
  • Prepare a charcoal grill, concentrating the hot coals onto one side of the kettle. Season fillets with salt. Place the fish, skin-side down, over the hottest part of the fire, leaving them there until the edges begin to crisp, about 2 minutes. To finish cooking, rotate the grill grate so the fish sits opposite the hot coals. Cover the grill and continue to cook for another 8-10 minutes, until fish is cooked through.
  • Transfer the draining citrus mixture into a bowl and gently stir in vinegar and olive oil.
  • Use a fish spatula to remove the fish from the grill and place them on a warm plate. Serve the fillets immediately with the marinated citrus salad