Eat Seafood, America!

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO HELP SAVE AN INDUSTRY THAT EMPLOYS 2 MILLION AMERICANS.

The coronavirus poses a significant threat to the U.S. seafood economy. Support our fishing communities by eating delicious seafood.

 

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO HELP YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM AND STAY HEALTHY.

Seafood’s omega-3s reduce inflammation, support your immune health and can even help reduce stress and anxiety — all things we need right now during these times.

 

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES THROUGH THESE UNPRECEDENTED TIMES.

Purchase seafood from Hy-Vee to cook at home, or order from your favorite restaurants for delivery or pick-up.

Many fishermen and distributors have shifted to online deliveries to help get healthy seafood to Americans. Help support these local businesses.

 

EAT SEAFOOD, AMERICA, TO TAKE YOUR TASTEBUDS ON VACATION.

Need an escape from your house?  Seafood can transport you to your favorite vacation memories!  Step 1: Make a festive meal, like fish tacos or crab cakes.   Step 2: Set the scene on the big screen – YouTube tranquil beach.  Step 3:  Pull up the coffee table and dig in!

 

Join the #EatSeafoodAmerica Movement.

Seasons Magazine: Maple-Scotch Salmon

Check out this delicious grilled salmon recipe from Hy-Vee’s most recent issue of Seasons magazine. Check out the latest issue online here or pick up a free copy at your local Hy-Vee store.

Maple-Scotch Salmon

Hands On: 30 minutes
Total Time: 50 minutes
Serves: 4

1 (15×5-in) cedar grilling plank
1 (1-to 1 1/2 pound) wild skin-on salmon fillet, 1/3 to 3/4 inch thick
1 tbsp McCormick Grill Mates Maple BBQ rub
1/4 cup smoky Scotch whisky, such as Lagavulin single-malt scotch
1 tbsp packed Hy-Vee dark brown sugar
1 tbsp Hy-Vee salted butter, melted
Fresh chives, for garnish
Lemon wedges, for garnish

  1. Soak cedar plank in water for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, pat salmon dry with paper towels. Sprinkle salmon with maple BBQ rub; slightly pat into surface of salmon. Cover and refrigerate for 15 minutes.
  2. For sauce, combine syrup, whisky, brown sugar and butter; reserve half of sauce for serving.
  3. Preheat a charcoal or gas grill for direct cooking over medium-high heat. Toast plank on grill for 2 to 4 minutes or until slightly charred, turning once.
  4. Place salmon, skin side down, on cedar plank. Grill for 15 to 20 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork (145 degrees F), brushing with remaining half of the sauce after 10 minutes of grilling. Remove from grill. Brush or drizzle with reserved sauce. Garnish with chives and lemon wedges, if desired.

Seafood Swap

Have you considered a Seafood Swap on some of your favorite foods? Summer is a great time to use seafood swaps in burgers, tacos, pizzas, pastas, skewers, salads and more! Bonus: It’s good for our health and the planet’s health.

The Seafood Nutrition Partnership staff have always liked to experiment in the kitchen and try out new recipes, and we’re here to share some of our learnings. This is a great time to learn how to swap different ingredients into favorite dishes or even try a new recipe. Below, we’ll talk about ideas for swapping seafood into your family’s favorite foods, talk about how different species of seafood can be swapped into dishes, and also share some tips on how we are creatively using items from our pantry to make recipes work when we don’t have all the correct ingredients on hand.

Also, check out our blog post about using canned or frozen seafood and another about our favorite comfort foods with seafood.

Seafood Swaps

Seafood works for all of your family’s favorite foods – even comfort foods! Think fish and shellfish when making burgers, tacos, pizza, salad, sandwiches, and more!

Tacos: This is arguably the easiest place to add seafood. Any fish as well as shrimp, lobster and scallops are all perfect vehicles for taco seasoning. Here are a couple of our favorite recipes (and we have dozens of variations):

 

Burgers: There are several types of seafood-based burgers available at grocery stores across the country, including salmon, Alaska pollock, shrimp and mahi mahi. But, you can also make them at home! Any “cake” recipe – think crab cakes – can be sized up for a full-size burger or just make mini sliders!

 

 

Pizza: Though we’re a nutrition organization, we strongly believe there is a place in everyone’s diet for pizza! Seafood makes for a great pizza topper. Try some of our favorite combos:

 

What Seafood Should I Buy?

In our Ultimate Guide to Buying Seafood and Ultimate Guide to Cooking Seafood, we share a lot of information about utilizing different species of seafood, as well as offer tips to make the most of what you can find at the grocery store. This includes lists of fish that have similar qualities such as taste profiles and cooking techniques.

If you’re looking for:

  • A light, delicate fish. Choose a lean fish, such as barramundi, sea bass, cod, flounder, grouper, haddock, halibut, mahi mahi, perch, pollock, red snapper, rockfish, sole or yellowfin tuna. For shellfish, shrimp, crab and lobster are light and lean.
  • For a richer taste. Choose a fattier fish usually with darker flesh, such as herring, mackerel, salmon, sardines, swordfish, trout or albacore tuna. Several shellfish varieties fit in this rich category and offer delicious briny flavor, such as clams, mussels and oysters.

In terms of cooking style, if you want to:

  • Grill: Many fish stand up to the heat, and it can bring out a delicious smoky flavor. Pick a variety that is firmer in texture, such as catfish, mahi mahi, salmon, scallops, shrimp, snapper, swordfish or tuna. Many fish also are great on grilled skewers!
  • Steam or poach: Try lean fish – mild-flavored with tender, white or pale flesh – such as sea bass, cod, flounder, grouper, haddock, halibut or pollock.
  • Broil or bake: Try a medium-fat fish, such as bluefish, catfish, salmon or swordfish.
  • Eat it without having to cook it: Choose a precooked fish that’s frozen (so you just have to warm it up), or opt for canned tuna, salmon, sardines or crab.

White fish is generally the best example of these “species swaps.” White fish is simply a mild-flavored, often slightly-sweet fish, which can be interchangeable in recipes. These include wild Alaska pollock, bass, cod, grouper, haddock and halibut. There are also some thinner fillets of white fish, which can be used in these recipes but keep in mind they cook much faster, including flounder, perch and sole. Learn all about these white fish options in this blog post.

To sum it up: Let availability and freshness be your guides. It’s easy to substitute one fish for another in a recipe. Also, keep in mind the frozen and canned sections offer the same health benefits and often a wider variety to choose from.

Recipe Ingredients on Hand

If you’re not be able to find all the ingredients to try out a specific recipe and we’re here to offer some easy swaps for some popular ingredients. Some general tips:

  • Fruits and vegetables can swap in recipes. For example, if you want to make this Smoked Salmon and Kale Frittata recipe that calls for kale, try spinach or even frozen spinach, just make sure you wring out excess liquid. Keep in mind for baking, the liquid in a recipe can throw off the end texture or the baking time.
  • Acidic liquid ingredients such as lemon juice and vinegar can be swapped, just keep in mind the end flavor profile. It’s a great time to use those random bottles of vinegar at the back of your pantry!
  • We always recommend using a lot of herbs and spices for flavoring, and only add salt if needed. Experiment with different flavor combos using those dried herbs you bought for a specific recipe months ago. We’ve been playing around with different spices in our tuna and salmon salads and found curry is amazing paired in this staple! (Try this recipe.)

Here are some tips to use ingredients you have on hand for cooking fish dishes:

Recipe calls for: Try swapping:
Buttermilk Yogurt, or milk with a small amount of lemon juice or vinegar added
Bread crumbs Rolled oats, crushed cereal, or crushed crackers
Cream (half and half) For one cup, 7/8 cup milk plus 1 Tbsp. butter
Cream (heavy) For one cup, 3/4 cup milk plus 1/3 cup butter
Cream cheese pureed cottage cheese
Garlic (clove) One clove of garlic = 1/8 tsp. garlic powder
Herbs (fresh) 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh = 1 tsp. dried herbs
Lemon zest Approximately double the quantity of lemon juice
Mayonnaise Avocado, plain Greek yogurt, sour cream
Sour cream plain Greek yogurt
Wine Broth, fruit juice mixed with a splash of vinegar

Tips For Grilling Seafood

The month of June heralds the full return of my favorite culinary tool: the outdoor grill. The smoky charm of being cooked over a live fires flatters skin-on trout fillets; super fresh sides of bluefish; and whole, oily, omega-3 rich mackerel alike.

But the fragile texture of fish fillets and the misconception that fish skin sticks to the grates, make the prospect of grilling fish intimidating. But I’ve got an easy answer to both concerns:  use the indirect grilling method for cooking all types of seafood. This technique employs two different cooking areas on the grill; one directly above the high heat of hot coals and the other sitting opposite the coals, where indirect heat gently cooks the fish to completion.

To set up a charcoal grill for indirect grilling, use a coal chimney to light the charcoal and when hot coals are ready, place all of them on one side of the kettle. Arrange well-seasoned fish fillets, skin-side down on the grill directly over these hot coals so they lay, head-to-tail, parallel to the grates.

Sear the fillets over the high heat for two minutes. Then rotate the grill grate 180 degrees, so the fish sits on the side of the grill away from the hot coals. Cover the grill, and finish cooking the fillets via indirect heat, which will take another 8-10 minutes (the general rule being 10 minutes total cooking time per inch of thickness.)

For gas grills, simply preheat both sides of the grill on high. Lay the fish on the grates on one side of the grill and cook for two minutes. Turn off the burner under the fish, but keep the burners opposite the fish fired up, cover the grill, and finish cooking.

This method also works well for smaller, whole fish. You do need to flip the fish over before rotating the grill grate away from the hots coals and cover the grill to cook it completely.

This technique helps cooks get more healthy seafood on the table more often. Please take the Seafood Nutrition Partnership’s Pledge to Eat #Seafood2xWk as a positive commitment to eat the USDA’s recommendation of eating two servings of seafood per week. To take the pledge, go to www.seafoodnutrition.org/pledge.

Grilled Skin-on Fish Fillets with Marinated Citrus Salad
This recipe works well with all types of fish fillets including Alaskan pollock, barramundi, John Dory, red snapper, salmon and trout.

Ingredients

  • 2 oranges, peeled and segmented
  • 1 lemon, peeled and segmented
  • 1 serrano chile, very thinly sliced
  • 1 shallot, very thinly sliced
  • Salt
  • 4 skin-on fish fillets
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons good red wine vinegar

Directions

  • Combine orange and lemon segments, chile, shallot, and salt to taste in a colander. Let mixture sit while you cook the fish.
  • Prepare a charcoal grill, concentrating the hot coals onto one side of the kettle. Season fillets with salt. Place the fish, skin-side down, over the hottest part of the fire, leaving them there until the edges begin to crisp, about 2 minutes. To finish cooking, rotate the grill grate so the fish sits opposite the hot coals. Cover the grill and continue to cook for another 8-10 minutes, until fish is cooked through.
  • Transfer the draining citrus mixture into a bowl and gently stir in vinegar and olive oil.
  • Use a fish spatula to remove the fish from the grill and place them on a warm plate. Serve the fillets immediately with the marinated citrus salad

Summertime Salmon Burgers

Grilling season is in full swing. Pick up some delicious salmon burgers at your local Hy-Vee seafood counter!

Grill burgers for 10 to 12 minutes or until internal temperature of burgers reaches 145 degrees, turning once halfway through.

Pair your burgers with bakery-fresh buns and serve with fresh toppings such as tomato, lettuce, onion or salsa. Enjoy!

 

Dish On Fish: Smoked Trout Dip

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

From Dish On Fish:

Need a nosh to get you through to dinnertime? Or an impressive snack to show off during the Zoom Happy Hour? You’ll flip for our new Smoked Trout Dip, a simple, savory, and satisfying treat that is also good for you. Easy to make, easy to store and easy to eat – think of this trout dip recipe as snack time made simple!

Seafood dips go perfectly with raw veggies, crackers, or pita. We’ve tested this theory with our other original dips – the salmon dipshrimp dip, and crab dip. All tasty ways to get your seafood servings in, especially if you’re looking for some healthy snacks.

So, let’s talk about smoked trout for a moment because it might not be on your standard grocery list. You may be surprised to discover that trout is in the salmon family, can be freshwater or saltwater, and has been cured. The result is a buttery, smoky, flaky product. It will come in a tin, pouch, or vacuum packed, making it another pantry- or fridge-stable seafood product that’s great to have on hand to top a salad or use in a dip.

A serving of smoked trout (about 4 oz.) provides a healthy dose of protein and vitamin D in a 100-calorie package. Plus, it is a tasty way to get part of your It’s a great way to boost protein at snack time. And, it’s a tasty way to get part of your 2-3 weekly servings of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans seafood recommendation.

One last thought – if there is any schmear leftover – treat yourself to Smoked Trout Dip on a bagel/toast tomorrow morning. Game changer! Enjoy!

 

Fish Tacos with Mango-Avocado Salsa

Happy Cinco de Mayo!

These quick and easy 20-minute fish tacos are the perfect addition for your Taco Tuesday + Cinco de Mayo crossover event.

 

 

ingredients

1 mango, peeled, pitted, and cubed
1 avocado, firm-ripe , peeled, pitted, and cubed
¼ c. red onion, finely chopped
2 tbsp. fresh cilantro, chopped
2 tbsp. fresh lime juice
1 tsp. Hy-Vee kosher sea salt, divided
1 lbs. tilapia fillets
½ tsp. Hy-Vee garlic powder
½ tsp. Hy-Vee ground cumin
½ tsp. Hy-Vee cayenne pepper
1 tbsp. Gustare Vita olive oil
4 (8-inch each) Hy-Vee flour tortillas

Directions

  1. Place mango, avocado, onion, cilantro, lime juice, and 1/2 teaspoon salt in a medium bowl; toss gently. Cover and refrigerate.

  2. Pat fish dry with paper towels. Combine remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt, garlic powder, cumin, and cayenne pepper; rub mixture on fish.

  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook fish in hot oil for 5 minutes or until fish easily flakes with a fork (145 degrees), turning once.

  4. Fill tortillas with fish and salsa.

Dish On Fish: Maple Walnut-Crusted Halibut

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

From Dish On Fish:

While we are always interested in eating a delicious seafood dinner, spending a lot of time in the kitchen cooking and cleaning is not always appealing. That’s why this Maple Walnut-Crusted Sheet Pan Halibut is a seafood mealtime must—it takes just minutes to make and cooks in one pan!

Halibut is a “meaty” white fish that can handle some heat! Whether grilling it or popping it in the oven (at 400 degrees for this recipe), you’ll love how well this sumptuous fish holds up to the heat. In this recipe, the crunch of the walnuts pairs deliciously with a little sweetness (thanks to maple syrup), which is why we absolutely love this dish. If you’ve eaten halibut in a restaurant but have yet to try it at home, we’re challenging you to add this amazing recipe to your repertoire—it’s a great fish dish to start with!

The first order of business is selecting the halibut. Ask your fishmonger for the freshest pieces or opt for frozen and defrost in your fridge. Frozen halibut is a great option to have on hand when it comes to weekly menu planning and meal prepping.

Not only is halibut delicious, it provides a boatload of healthful nutrients, like muscle-building protein, immune-boosting selenium and heart-healthy omega-3s. Eating fish regularly has been shown to help improve cholesterol, manage weight and boost brain and heart health.

This recipe is one of our personal favorites, as the combination of sweet maple syrup and walnut crunch adds a flavorful texture to this nutrient-filled dish.

Maple Walnut-Crusted Sheet Pan Halibut

Ingredients
  • 1 lb halibut skin removed
  • 1 1/2 cups walnuts finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 1/4 cup Dijon mustard
  • 2 cups sweet potatoes thinly sliced
  • 1 bunch asparagus spears 6 – 8 spears per serving, ends trimmed
  • 1 tbsp olive oil extra virgin
  • 2 lemons sliced
Instructions

1. Heat oven to 400°F.Line a sheet pan with foil and either spray it lightly with cooking spray or brush with olive oil.
2. Trim tough ends from asparagus. Toss with a teaspoon of olive oil.
3. Peel and slice sweet potatoes very thinly (1/8th inch). Toss with 2 tsp. olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.
4. Chop walnuts, transfer to a small bowl and combine with lemon zest, maple syrup and dill.
5. Remove skin from halibut pieces, spread opposite sides of each with 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard. Press walnut mixture on top.
6. Arrange asparagus and sweet potatoes on baking sheet and top with halibut.
7. Bake at 400°F for 10 minutes. Let stand for 5-7 minutes. Serve.

Sheet Pan Tilapia

Dinner is served… on one sheet pan, that is. Place seasoned tilapia fillets on a sheet pan and surround with fresh green beans and cherry tomatoes for a meal that is ready in under 30 minutes. This recipe takes a total of 30 minutes and serves 3.

Ingredients
Quantity Ingredient
3 tilapia fillets, thawed if frozen
1 tbsp. Hy-Vee unsalted butter, melted
1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1 tsp. Tone’s cilantro lime seasoning
2 c. fresh green beans, trimmed
1 c. yellow and red cherry tomatoes, halved
1 lemon, sliced
1 tbsp. Gustare Vita olive oil
Hy-Vee salt
Hy-Vee ground black pepper

 

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray a foil-lined baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray; set aside.

  2. Pat tilapia dry with paper towels. In a small bowl, mix together butter, lemon juice, and cilantro lime seasoning; brush onto fish.

  3. In a medium bowl, combine green beans, tomatoes, lemon slices, olive oil, salt, and pepper; toss to coat. Place coated vegetables around fish on baking sheet.

  4. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until fish easily flakes with a fork (145 degrees) and vegetables are crisp-tender. Serve immediately.

Dish On Fish: Simple Tuna Croquettes

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

From Dish On Fish:

Bonjour, seafoodies!

Hailing from France, croquettes may sound fancy, but our Tuna Croquettes come together in just over 30 minutes! Full of healthy tuna and loaded with flavor, these patties are great for a snack, light meal or even a party.

We love tuna because it is convenient and full of essential nutrients, like protein, B vitamins, selenium and, of course, omega-3s. Omega-3 fatty acids like DHA and EPA lower chronic inflammation in the body, which helps to boost immunity and heart and brain health. In order to meet omega-3 needs, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends eating seafood 2-3 times each week.

Keep some pantry-perfect tuna (either pouched or canned) on hand to whip these up anytime. We added a lemon-pepper dipping sauce for a fresh zing to accompany this tuna recipe. So, let’s make some delicious tuna croquettes. Ooh-la-la!

Tip: Our Tuna Croquettes can be made ahead and kept in the fridge for up to 3 hours before cooking.

Tuna Croquettes with Lemon-Caper Sauce

Prep time: 10 minutes
Refrigeration time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes
Total time: 35 minutes

Servings: 4

Suggested cooking tools: parchment paper, foil, plate or baking pan, sauté pan, 1 medium mixing bowl, 2 small mixing bowls, whisk, cutting board, knife, spatula

Ingredients – Tuna Croquettes

  • ½ cup whole-wheat or all-purpose flour (use gluten-free flour to make GF croquettes)
  • 1 cup panko, divided in half (use gluten-free panko to make GF croquettes)
  • 1 tsp Old Bay seasoning or paprika
  • ½ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp ground black pepper
  • 2 large eggs, beaten
  • 2-3 tsp lemon juice, freshly squeezed
  • 2 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 2 (5-oz) pouches or cans albacore tuna, drained well and flaked with a fork
  • 2 green onions or scallions, finely chopped
  • Optional: ¼ cup frozen sweet peas, thawed

Ingredients – Lemon-Caper Sauce

  • ½ cup plain nonfat Greek yogurt
  • 2 Tbsp. mayonnaise
  • 1 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 3-4 tsp. capers, drained
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

Instructions

  1. In medium bowl, mix the first 8 ingredients listed (flour through mustard, including ½ cup of the panko). Add tuna, green onions and sweet peas (if using); mix well to combine. Divide mixture into 8 oval or round croquette patties and set on plate (or baking pan) lined with parchment paper. Cover plate with foil and refrigerate for at least 15 minutes. Note: can make patties ahead of time and refrigerate them for up to 3 hours.
  2. While croquette patties chill in the fridge, make lemon-caper sauce by mixing remaining ingredients yogurt through garlic – but not the olive oil – in a small bowl; whisk until combined. If sauce needs thinning, add more lemon juice.
  3. Remove croquette patties from fridge. Heat olive oil in sauté pan over medium heat. While oil is heating, put remaining ½ cup panko into a small mixing bowl and coat all sides of each croquette with the panko.
  4. Place croquette patties in sauté pan and cook 3-4 minutes per side, or until golden brown. (Can cook the patties in batches, if necessary.) Allow croquettes to cool for 2-3 minutes before serving. Top with the lemon-caper sauce.

Suggested accompaniments: mixed greens or baby arugula plus halved cherry tomatoes.