Recipe highlight: Sockeye salmon is in season, fresh and a responsible choice option

Sockeye salmon is in season now and is arriving fresh daily at Hy-Vee.

Because it’s from Alaska, where sustainability of the seafood industry, the state’s largest employer, is so important it’s written into the state Constitution, Hy-Vee’s customers have the satisfaction of knowing that the salmon comes from the best managed fisheries in the world.

The question isn’t so much whether you want to serve it to your family – of course you do, because it’s one of the healthiest species of seafood in our cases– but how to prepare it in a variety of ways.

I like this recipe because it offers a different take on preparing salmon. Salmon is a great grilling fish, but if you don’t have access to a grill or just prefer to cook inside, consider this recipe. It’s baked in the oven.

People don’t often think about using cheese when they prepare seafood, but the result with this recipe is a very creamy and very approachable taste, especially for new seafood eaters.

This recipe is very filling and meets several MyPlate requirements, offering protein, vegetables and dairy. It’s a perfect recipe for a crowd and is guaranteed to please.


Spinach and Artichoke Salmon

All you need:

  • 1 pound sockeye salmon fillet
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 cup fresh spinach
  • 1/4 cup Hy-Vee garlic aioli
  • 1/4 cup canned artichokes, then pureed
  • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

All you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  2. Place salmon fillet on the baking sheet and season with salt and pepper. Layer the spinach on top of the salmon in a very thin layer, so it covers the surface of the fish completely.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the aioli and artichoke puree; spread it evenly on top of spinach. Top with shredded Parmesan and mozzarella cheeses.
  4. Bake in the oven for 14 to 16 minutes, then broil for 2 to 4 minutes, until cheese is golden brown.

Recipe Spotlight: Create a Healthy Meal Plan with Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood and MyPlate

Eating healthy doesn’t mean that you have to stock your refrigerator and pantry with bland, boring foods and give up everything that tastes good.

In fact, the opposite is true. The proof is in the taste. Try this meal of Triple Berry Wild Salmon with Quinoa Pilaf and Mixed Salad Greens.

This menu plan uses fresh Alaskan salmon, a Responsible Choice option that will be available in Hy-Vee seafood cases through fall. When customers see the Responsible Choice label, they can feel confident the fish they’re purchasing was caught using catch or farming methods that protect the oceans and sea life for future generations.

It also follows MyPlate recommendations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture that divides foods into five groups: protein, fruits, vegetables, grains and dairy. This menu plan contains four of the five food groups, and you can always meet the dairy requirement with a glass of milk or low-fat frozen yogurt or similar healthy dairy-based dessert.


Triple Berry Wild Salmon

Serves 2

All you need:

  • 2 tsp peanut oil
  • 2 tbsp chopped onions
  • 8 oz fresh Responsible Choice Alaska salmon
  • 5 asparagus spears, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup raspberries
  • 1/4 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup sliced strawberries
  • 2 tbsp orange juice, optional

All you do:

  1. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat. Add onions and brown slightly.
  2. Add salmon and asparagus; cook for 1 to 2 minutes.
  3. Add berries. They will release juices, but if the pan looks dry, stir in the orange juice.
  4. Cook until the salmon is cooked through, about 5 to 8 minutes.

Source: recipes.sparkpeople.com


Quinoa Pilaf

Serves 6

All you need:

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped finely
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup finely diced carrots
  • 1 medium red pepper, chopped
  • 2 cups quinoa, rinsed thoroughly in a fine sieve
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Heat oil in a large skillet, on medium-high heat. Add onion; cook until soft, 3 minutes.
  2. Add garlic, carrots and red pepper, cooking until soft, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add quinoa and broth. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low.
  4. Simmer, covered, 20 minutes or until water is absorbed.
  5. Stir in peas, salt and black pepper to taste.

Source: Suite 101.com


Mixed Greens
Use a combination of any of the following bitter and mild greens. Serve Triple Berry Salmon on top of greens or as desired.
Torn peppery and/or bitter greens: frisee, watercress, radicchio or arugula.
Mild greens: lettuce, baby spinach or baby romaine.

Follow MyPlate! Guidelines So You Don’t Blow the Benefits of a Heart-Healthy Responsible Choice Seafood Diet

myPlate

If you’re adding fish to your diet to maintain heart health – and you should – it’s easy to cancel out those benefits by filling the rest of your plate with unhealthy choices.

The best way to avoid this trap is to follow the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s MyPlate! guidelines. A quarter of the plate is protein, in this case, heart-healthy fish; half of the plate is fruits and vegetables; and the final quarter is grains.

For grains, choose a brown rice or whole-grain pasta. A trendy option is high-protein, gluten-free quinoa (pronounced keen-wah), which is often used as a replacement for oatmeal or brown rice. You can make it savory by adding soy sauce and herbs and spices, or use it in a cold salad with peppers, onions and black beans, tossed in an oil and vinegar dressing.

Many people don’t get enough vegetables, so be sure to include a nice, large serving. There are no unhealthy vegetables. If it comes from the ground and is made in the dirt and not in the factory, it’s going to be good for us and have health benefits. But we can do some unbeneficial things to vegetables by putting too much oil or salt in it during processing.

There are two categories of vegetables – starchy and non-starchy. The starchy vegetables are potatoes, peas, corn and legumes. They’re still very nutritious, but they have higher calories. For those who are adding more fish to their diets for heart health, or weight and diabetes control, limiting quantities is important.

One vegetable in this group that gets a bad rap because it contains carbohydrates is the white potato, but potatoes also contain beneficial nutrients, antioxidants and fiber. Again, portion control is the key. Choose portions the size of a fist, not a shoe. Some salt, pepper and butter are OK, but if you add sour cream, cheese and bacon bits, or process the potatoes into chips, you’re losing the benefits.

The non-starchy vegetables include everything else – tomatoes, green beans, cauliflower, eggplant, onions and so forth. You can eat these in unlimited quantities, but again, watch what you’re topping the with, like heavy cheese sauces.

Finally, make sure that you’re getting enough fruit, which also contains antioxidants and fiber. Because fruits can cause a rise in blood sugar, watch your intake and the amount you eating, especially if you’re diabetic. A good rule of thumb is a one-half cup portion, which has about 15 grams of carbohydrates. That’s an apple the size of a tennis ball.

If you can get three or four of these food groups in a meal, you’re doing a good job. Think about food as preventive medicine. I’m a big believer that the solution needs to be food, not a pill.