Recipe Spotlight: Responsible Choice Alaska Crab Lettuce Wraps

This recipe features Responsible Choice Alaska crab, while offering a light and refreshing option with bright flavors. It’s a perfect meal that will keep your 2015 resolutions on track.


Responsible Choice Alaska Crab Lettuce Wraps

All you need:

Vinaigrette

  • 1/2 tbsp minced shallot
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • juice of 1/2 lime
  • 3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Salad

  • 1 pound cooked Responsible Choice Alaska crab meat, diced
  • 1 avocado, pitted, peeled and diced
  • 1 mango, peeled and diced
  • 2 ribs celery, diced
  • 1/4 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 1 head Bibb lettuce (whole leaves), rinsed and patted dry

All you do:

  1. Whisk all vinaigrette ingredients together in a bowl.
  2. Combine crab, avocado, mango, celery, bell pepper and onions in a bowl.
  3. Pour just enough dressing over the salad to coat lightly. Toss gently.
  4. Place 2 tablespoons salad onto each lettuce leaf and roll into wraps.

Recipe Spotlight: Responsible Choice Alaska Crab, Blood Orange & Farro Salad

With all the New Year’s resolutions being made to eat healthier in 2015, I wanted to share an idea for a healthy crab salad using farro and blood oranges. Farro is a pearled wheat product loaded with fiber and protein. It cooks like rice, but the texture is a bit chewier. Farro takes on flavors well, which makes it a nice variation to add to your diet. Using Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Alaska crab in this recipe makes you feel good about eating healthy and supporting healthy oceans.


Responsible Choice Alaska Crab, Blood Orange & Farro Salad

Serves 4 (1-1/2 cups each).

All you need:

For the vinaigrette:

Responsible Choice Alaska Crab, Blood Orange & Farro Salad

  • 1/2 cup blood orange juice (juiced from blood oranges used in salad)
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 1 tbsp minced fennel fronds
  • 1 tsbp stone-ground mustard
  • 1 tbsp honey or agave nectar
  • 1/4 cup Hy-Vee extra virgin olive oil

For the salad:

  • 1 cup Hy-Vee farro, cooked and cooled
  • 2 avocados, cubed
  • 1/4 bulb fennel, sliced thinly
  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced red onions
  • 1/2 diced red pepper
  • 1/4 cup minced parsley
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 2 cups cooked Responsible Choice Crab legs, picked from shell (6 to 8 legs)
  • 3 blood oranges, segments removed and set aside (save the pulp for the juice)
  • Mixed greens, for serving

All you do:

To make the vinaigrette:

  1. In a small bowl, add the orange juice, lime juice, black pepper, salt, red pepper flakes, fennel fronds, mustard and honey. Whisk in the olive oil to combine.

For the salad:

  1. In a larger bowl, add the farro, avocado, fennel, red onions, red pepper and parsley.
  2. Drizzle the vinaigrette over the farro and vegetables. Toss to combine. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Add in the crab meat and orange segments. Gently mix to combine.
  4. Place a bed of mixed greens on each of four plates; top each with a mound of the salad mixture.

Recipe Spotlight: Responsible Choice Copper River “Greek” Salmon

This recipe features all the wonderful flavors of a gyro—but leaves out the bread. Feel free to serve pita bread on the side if you prefer. It’s simple, refreshing and filling.


Responsible Choice Copper River “Greek” Salmon

Serves 4

SalmonAll you need:

  • 1 cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt
  • 1 tbsp dill weed
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp celery salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 pound Responsible Choice Copper River salmon
  • 1/2 cup pitted, halved Kalamata olives
  • 1/2 cup halved grape tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese

All you do:

  1. Prepare the yogurt sauce by placing Greek yogurt, dill weed, garlic, celery salt and black pepper in a medium bowl; stir until all combined. Set aside.
  2. In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, add the olive oil and salmon, skin side up. Cook for about 4 minutes. Turn the fish over and cook another 3 to 5 minutes until the salmon is opaque and flaky. Transfer salmon to plate and top with yogurt sauce, olives, tomatoes and feta cheese.

Adding Responsible Choice Seafood to Your Traditional Christmas Dinner

Responsible Choice seafood is a delicious and easy way to improve your health year-round, and it is a great way to bring a lighter dish to your holiday table.

The American Heart Association recommends consuming fish two times per week with servings of 3.5 ounces or about 3/4 cup of flaked fish. Seafood is naturally high in essential vitamins like A, E, D and C and minerals like zinc, iron, calcium and selenium. Seafood is also low in calories, and cholesterol in shellfish is equal to the amount of cholesterol in lean beef.

Yet traditional holiday dinners often include other main courses such as turkey, ham, roasts or prime rib. For a flavorful and nutritious dinner option, consider adding Responsible Choice seafood to your spread using fatty fish such as wild Alaska salmon, Hy-Vee Select canned pole and troll albacore tuna or U.S.-farmed rainbow trout. Fatty fish tend to be higher in omega-3 fatty acids which have several health benefits that may reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, reduce inflammation and assist with brain function. Most seafood has no saturated fat content, which will provide a great option for your guests watching their fat intake.

Don’t know how to add Responsible Choice seafood to your Christmas dinner? Here are a variety of delicious, healthy ideas:

  • Marinate and grill in aluminum foil
  • Use in casseroles instead of beef or chicken
  • Use in sandwiches and salads for a lean protein
  • Pan-fry in a small amount of olive oil with your favorite herbs and seasonings
  • Use in a stir-fry with your favorite vegetables
  • Incorporate into a light pasta dish
  • Use in your favorite soup and stew recipes

Hy-Vee makes it easy for you to make these healthy choices for the holidays. Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood comes from the best, top-quality suppliers in the industry. Hy-Vee employs a full-time, in-house U.S. Department of Commerce federal inspector, and the seafood program is U.S. Federal Drug Administration and Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Point-approved. Our warehouse has fresh seafood arriving daily by plane or truck and it’s lot-inspected for quality and wholesomeness.

Look for Responsible Choice seafood at your local Hy-Vee today.

Recipe Spotlight: Mt. Cook Alpine King Salmon Fillets

As the nights become cooler, many people look for comfort foods to enjoy. This recipe not only provides delicious comfort food, but it’s rich and hearty. Although simple to prepare, the combination of ingredients will impress your guests.

My store’s dietitian agrees that this recipe is heart-healthy because of the salmon, white beans and kale. Mt. Cook salmon itself is incredibly healthy. The omega-3 fatty acids in this fish are comparable to wild-caught salmon, and have three times the amount of omega-3 oils as Atlantic salmon and in comparison, has very low intramuscular fat.

One of the best options in the Hy-Vee seafood case is Mt. Cook Alpine salmon.


Roasted Mt. Cook King Salmon with White Bean Ragout

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 4 (6 oz each) Mt. Cook king salmon fillets, skin removed
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp olive oil, divided
  • 2 tbsp chopped shallots
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped
  • 2 leaves kale, stem removed and roughly chopped
  • 1 cup thinly sliced portobello mushrooms
  • 2 (15 oz each) cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup chicken stock, divided, as needed
  • 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tbsp butter

All you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Season both sides of the salmon fillets with salt and pepper and place in a greased baking dish. Place in oven and roast for 10 to 12 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.
  3. Meanwhile, in a large sauté pan, over medium heat, add 1 tablespoon oil. Add the shallots, garlic, kale and mushrooms; season with salt and pepper. Cook until the mushrooms and kale start to wilt, about 3 to 4 minutes.
  4. Add the white beans and ¾ cup chicken stock; season again with salt and pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook for 5 to 6 minutes until slightly thickened, but beans still retain their shape (can add more or less stock to achieve desired consistency). Stir in the Parmesan cheese and butter.
  5. To serve, place equal amounts of the bean ragout on each of four plates and top with the salmon fillets; serve immediately.

Recipe highlight: Sockeye salmon is in season, fresh and a responsible choice option

Sockeye salmon is in season now and is arriving fresh daily at Hy-Vee.

Because it’s from Alaska, where sustainability of the seafood industry, the state’s largest employer, is so important it’s written into the state Constitution, Hy-Vee’s customers have the satisfaction of knowing that the salmon comes from the best managed fisheries in the world.

The question isn’t so much whether you want to serve it to your family – of course you do, because it’s one of the healthiest species of seafood in our cases– but how to prepare it in a variety of ways.

I like this recipe because it offers a different take on preparing salmon. Salmon is a great grilling fish, but if you don’t have access to a grill or just prefer to cook inside, consider this recipe. It’s baked in the oven.

People don’t often think about using cheese when they prepare seafood, but the result with this recipe is a very creamy and very approachable taste, especially for new seafood eaters.

This recipe is very filling and meets several MyPlate requirements, offering protein, vegetables and dairy. It’s a perfect recipe for a crowd and is guaranteed to please.


Spinach and Artichoke Salmon

All you need:

  • 1 pound sockeye salmon fillet
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 cup fresh spinach
  • 1/4 cup Hy-Vee garlic aioli
  • 1/4 cup canned artichokes, then pureed
  • 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

All you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  2. Place salmon fillet on the baking sheet and season with salt and pepper. Layer the spinach on top of the salmon in a very thin layer, so it covers the surface of the fish completely.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the aioli and artichoke puree; spread it evenly on top of spinach. Top with shredded Parmesan and mozzarella cheeses.
  4. Bake in the oven for 14 to 16 minutes, then broil for 2 to 4 minutes, until cheese is golden brown.

Recipe Spotlight: Create a Healthy Meal Plan with Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood and MyPlate

Eating healthy doesn’t mean that you have to stock your refrigerator and pantry with bland, boring foods and give up everything that tastes good.

In fact, the opposite is true. The proof is in the taste. Try this meal of Triple Berry Wild Salmon with Quinoa Pilaf and Mixed Salad Greens.

This menu plan uses fresh Alaskan salmon, a Responsible Choice option that will be available in Hy-Vee seafood cases through fall. When customers see the Responsible Choice label, they can feel confident the fish they’re purchasing was caught using catch or farming methods that protect the oceans and sea life for future generations.

It also follows MyPlate recommendations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture that divides foods into five groups: protein, fruits, vegetables, grains and dairy. This menu plan contains four of the five food groups, and you can always meet the dairy requirement with a glass of milk or low-fat frozen yogurt or similar healthy dairy-based dessert.


Triple Berry Wild Salmon

Serves 2

All you need:

  • 2 tsp peanut oil
  • 2 tbsp chopped onions
  • 8 oz fresh Responsible Choice Alaska salmon
  • 5 asparagus spears, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/4 cup raspberries
  • 1/4 cup blueberries
  • 1/4 cup sliced strawberries
  • 2 tbsp orange juice, optional

All you do:

  1. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat. Add onions and brown slightly.
  2. Add salmon and asparagus; cook for 1 to 2 minutes.
  3. Add berries. They will release juices, but if the pan looks dry, stir in the orange juice.
  4. Cook until the salmon is cooked through, about 5 to 8 minutes.

Source: recipes.sparkpeople.com


Quinoa Pilaf

Serves 6

All you need:

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped finely
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup finely diced carrots
  • 1 medium red pepper, chopped
  • 2 cups quinoa, rinsed thoroughly in a fine sieve
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 cup frozen peas, thawed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Heat oil in a large skillet, on medium-high heat. Add onion; cook until soft, 3 minutes.
  2. Add garlic, carrots and red pepper, cooking until soft, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add quinoa and broth. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to medium-low.
  4. Simmer, covered, 20 minutes or until water is absorbed.
  5. Stir in peas, salt and black pepper to taste.

Source: Suite 101.com


Mixed Greens
Use a combination of any of the following bitter and mild greens. Serve Triple Berry Salmon on top of greens or as desired.
Torn peppery and/or bitter greens: frisee, watercress, radicchio or arugula.
Mild greens: lettuce, baby spinach or baby romaine.

Follow MyPlate! Guidelines So You Don’t Blow the Benefits of a Heart-Healthy Responsible Choice Seafood Diet

myPlate

If you’re adding fish to your diet to maintain heart health – and you should – it’s easy to cancel out those benefits by filling the rest of your plate with unhealthy choices.

The best way to avoid this trap is to follow the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)’s MyPlate! guidelines. A quarter of the plate is protein, in this case, heart-healthy fish; half of the plate is fruits and vegetables; and the final quarter is grains.

For grains, choose a brown rice or whole-grain pasta. A trendy option is high-protein, gluten-free quinoa (pronounced keen-wah), which is often used as a replacement for oatmeal or brown rice. You can make it savory by adding soy sauce and herbs and spices, or use it in a cold salad with peppers, onions and black beans, tossed in an oil and vinegar dressing.

Many people don’t get enough vegetables, so be sure to include a nice, large serving. There are no unhealthy vegetables. If it comes from the ground and is made in the dirt and not in the factory, it’s going to be good for us and have health benefits. But we can do some unbeneficial things to vegetables by putting too much oil or salt in it during processing.

There are two categories of vegetables – starchy and non-starchy. The starchy vegetables are potatoes, peas, corn and legumes. They’re still very nutritious, but they have higher calories. For those who are adding more fish to their diets for heart health, or weight and diabetes control, limiting quantities is important.

One vegetable in this group that gets a bad rap because it contains carbohydrates is the white potato, but potatoes also contain beneficial nutrients, antioxidants and fiber. Again, portion control is the key. Choose portions the size of a fist, not a shoe. Some salt, pepper and butter are OK, but if you add sour cream, cheese and bacon bits, or process the potatoes into chips, you’re losing the benefits.

The non-starchy vegetables include everything else – tomatoes, green beans, cauliflower, eggplant, onions and so forth. You can eat these in unlimited quantities, but again, watch what you’re topping the with, like heavy cheese sauces.

Finally, make sure that you’re getting enough fruit, which also contains antioxidants and fiber. Because fruits can cause a rise in blood sugar, watch your intake and the amount you eating, especially if you’re diabetic. A good rule of thumb is a one-half cup portion, which has about 15 grams of carbohydrates. That’s an apple the size of a tennis ball.

If you can get three or four of these food groups in a meal, you’re doing a good job. Think about food as preventive medicine. I’m a big believer that the solution needs to be food, not a pill.

Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood Soothes Your Conscience While Contributing to Heart and Brain Health

Hy-Vee’s new Responsible Choice seafood initiative is taking away some of the worry for people who want the health benefits of seafood, but don’t want to contribute to over-fishing and other practices that threaten the supply of seafood and damage the environment.

Dieticians recommended that people eat two to three servings – each in the 3- to 4-ounce range – of fish per week. We know there are health benefits, such as lowering the risk for strokes or heart attacks and increasing brain health, but research also suggests that eating more fish lowers the risk for certain kinds of cancer.

Salmon Filets with Cutting BoardThe top reason for that? Fish are loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids.

Of the three essential Omega-3s – Eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosahexaenoic (DHA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) – only EPA and DHA are found exclusively in seafood and marine algae.

ALA is also found in plants, such as flax, walnuts, chia and pumpkin seeds, and although it’s true that ALA can be converted by the body to EPA and DHA, the conversion rate is very low. Only a fraction of a percent is actually converted to EPA and DHA.

If you’re looking to improve your heart and brain health, salmon and tuna are great sources for Omega-3 acids, but so are trout, mackerel and herring. On the other hand, seafood species like shrimp, crab, lobster and clams have very little Omega-3 content.

That’s not to say they’re not healthy. They’re still extremely nutritious. Shrimp, for example, is a great source of protein.

Many times when people are trying to lose weight, they think the only answer is to cut back on what they eat. That can backfire, because it leaves them feeling hungry. Eating more protein can keep them feeling full and satisfied. That’s also helpful in maintaining blood sugars. When you increase your protein intake, you don’t have those highs and lows that can lead to hunger and lack of concentration.

If you want to lose weight, seafood is a great high-protein, low-calorie center-plate replacement that will leave you feeling full and satisfied. When adding more seafood to your diet as part of a weight-loss plan, look for nutrient dense species.

The calories you’re getting will be very well spent, because you’ll get a lot of nutrients with them – protein, beneficial fats and other nutrients. Clams for example, have 30 percent of your daily need for iron, as well calcium and other vitamins.

All seafood is beneficial. The only possible downside is mercury content – especially in shark, swordfish, tilefish and king mackerel. Visit Hy-Vee’s seafood counter for more information about seafood species that are both low in mercury and Responsible Choices.

Besides looking at how the fish was caught and the effect on the ocean’s environment, Hy-Vee’s suppliers also consider seafood’s safety for consumption.