Recipe Spotlight: Two Zesty Ways to Add More Heart-Healthy Responsible Choice Wild Alaska Salmon to Your Diet

Hy-Vee Responsible Choice salmon is still coming in fresh from Alaska. Here are some recipes that add variety as you include heart-healthy, Omega 3 fatty acid-rich salmon into your diet.

With any of these dishes, I would stick to a dry white wine such as a buttery Chardonnay, or Elk Grove Vineyards Pinot Noir Rose 2013.


Coconut Poached Wild Alaska Salmon with Minted Peas and Basmati Rice

Serves 4

All you need:

For the marinade:

  • 2 tbsp red or white wine vinegar
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric

For the salmon:

  • 4 (5 oz each) Responsible Choice skin-on salmon portions
  • 1 (14 oz) box Basmati boil-in-bag white rice (2 bags)
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2-inch piece fresh ginger, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 (14.5 oz) can coconut milk
  • 1 (12 oz) package steam-in-the-bag sugar snap peas
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. For the marinade: mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Rub over salmon pieces. Let sit for about 30 minutes at room temperature.
  2. Fill a stock pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add the rice and boil 8 to 10 minutes. When rice is done, remove to a serving dish and fluff with fork. Keep warm.
  3. In a high-sided sauté pan, melt the butter and olive oil together. Add ginger and garlic. Sauté for 1 minute. Add salmon skin-side-down. Crisp the skin a little bit, then flip over and add the coconut milk, just enough to come up halfway to the salmon. Simmer the salmon in the coconut milk until cooked through, 6 to 10 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, steam the snap peas in the microwave. Remove from package. Add mint and salt and pepper. Serve the salmon over the rice with the peas alongside.

Balsamic Glazed Wild Alaska Salmon

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 4 (5 oz each) Responsible Choice salmon portions
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Hy-Vee extra-virgin olive oil
  • Hy-Vee balsamic glaze

What you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Season salmon with a little salt and pepper. Place on a sheet pan. Drizzle with a little olive oil. Bake in oven for about 10 to 12 minutes.
  3. Glaze with balsamic. Serve with wild rice pilaf and fresh vegetables.

Recipe Spotlight: For a Quick, Healthy Meal, Put Responsible Choice Salmon on the Smoker

With everyone on the go this weekend and throughout the summer, smoked salmon is a healthy, quick meal that can be made ahead of time. The leftovers (if you have any) can be used on top of a salad or made into a dip.

At your family’s Fourth of July gathering – or any other time you’re dining al fresco – remember this simple rule: Always keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. When it comes to smoked salmon, you want to make sure that it is not left out for more than an hour or two at the most, and make sure you keep it hot or cold the entire time.

Some types of wood that can be used for smoking salmon are hickory, mesquite, apple wood or cherry wood. Apple chips soaked in apple cider or even a hard cider would give the salmon the essence of apple flavor. By keeping the rub simple, you are able to taste the flavor of the fish. At Hy-Vee, we use a rub with brown sugar, Old Bay, salt and pepper.

I prefer my salmon lightly smoked and cooked to medium rare, so that it still has moisture left in it. If you set your smoker at 220 degrees and smoke your salmon for about 45 minutes, the end result will be just that: moist and delicious. You can enjoy your Responsible Choice smoked salmon straight off the smoker. If you plan on eating your smoked salmon later, it will keep for about a week in an airtight container in the refrigerator. If you’re shopping Responsible Choice, a safe bet is either wild or Alaskan salmon. Some farm-raised salmon is not Responsible Choice.

With the addition of a Cherry, Wild Rice and Quinoa Salad, you have a healthy and balanced meal.

One of my family’s favorite ways of enjoying smoked salmon is for breakfast. We toast an everything bagel, spread cream cheese on it, then top with thick slices of red onion, fresh tomatoes and, of course, the smoked salmon.

The following recipe pairs well with a chilled rose or, for those who prefer beer, Sierra Nevada’s Summertime Ale.

Smoked Salmon Log with Sweet and Spicy Pecans

All you need:

  • 2 (8 oz each) packages cream cheese, softened
  • 1/2 pound smoked salmon, flaked
  • 2 tbsp minced fresh dill
  • 2 tbsp minced red onion
  • 1 tbsp prepared horseradish
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 cup Sweet and Spicy Pecans, recipe follows

All you do:

  1. In a medium bowl, beat the cream cheese until smooth. Gradually fold in salmon, dill, onion, horseradish and lemon juice.
  2. Place some of the mixture on a piece of waxed paper or plastic wrap. Form a log about 1 inch thick. Place some pecans on another sheet of waxed paper or plastic wrap; roll the log in the pecans until well coated. Twist the ends to seal. Refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

Sweet and Spicy Pecans

All you need:

  • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tsp seasoning salt
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper, or more if you prefer
  • 2 cups chopped pecans

All you do:

  1. Melt butter in a large pan over medium heat.
  2. Add sugar, seasoning salt, garlic powder, cayenne and pecans; stir until the spices start to give off an aroma, 1 to 2 minutes.

Cheers! Choose the Right Wine and Beer to Complement Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Seafood

Whether wine or beer, the beverage paired with Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood is as important to its taste as the spices and sauces used in the preparation of the fish.

Sue Navratil here:
One of my favorite seafood choices is Pacific halibut. It’s easy to prepare and has a delicate, almost sweet taste. There are many wines that go well with halibut and other white fish, but one of the best is an unoaked chardonnay.

These wines have brighter fruit, they’re not heavy and laden with oak and butter, and their fruit shines through for a clean, crisp taste.

Some other good choices:

  • Dry roses have nice acidity and a bit of fruit that will complement that bit of sweetness and delicate taste of the halibut.
  • Dry chenin blanc. When dry chenins are their best, they will have a bit of sweetness of the grape. The wine is still dry, so it leaves the palate nice and clean.
  • Beaujolais. This wine from the Beaujolais region of France has a very light body and is dry and fruity. It has more body than a dry rose and has nice fruit, but not a lot of sugar to get in the way of the flavors of the fish. It’s also a bit more delicate, so it’s nice to pair with delicate fish.

The old adage that only white wine is paired with fish isn’t necessarily true. Many white wines do accompany fish well, but so will red wines with nice acidity, a light to medium body and low tannins.

With Responsible Source-labeled salmon, tuna and some of the meatier fishes, you can get into some red wines for sure. Pinot Noir has wonderful fruit and strong acidity that make it pair well with food in general, but with fish especially well because it doesn’t have all those heavy tannins.

Chardonnays with some nice butter and oak work especially well with salmon because it’s a fairly fatty fish. When you pair them, those buttery textures in the chardonnay and the fat in the salmon are a nice complement.

Go with a California pinot noir for tuna, a dense, meaty fish. Even if it’s only seared and is still a bit rare in the center, it has a meaty texture so it can handle the heavier body and riper fruit in these wines.

Rieslings, which have a drier, clean, crisp and almost citrusy taste, are good to pair with fish prepared with wasabi or spicy Thai seasonings. A taste of sweet, cool Riesling soothes and helps correct that crazy taste sensation you get with wasabi.

Champagne is also great with any fish that’s prepared tartare.

About the Author
I’m Sue Navratil, and I am a certified specialist of wine (CWS), which I earned by passing a rigorous exam through the Society of Wine Educators. There are only seven of us in the Hy-Vee system.

I work in the North Ankeny Boulevard Hy-Vee store. I love my job. Besides getting to work every day with wine, which is my passion, I help customers learn about wine and choose wine for their events, and facilitate their events by pouring wine.

I do a monthly wine club at the store and other occasional special wine events. I also write my own personal wine blog, naviwine.blogspot.com, which features wines that are available in my store.


Brian here:
The idea of pairing is for the dish and the beer to complement each other and make a new experience. Both can be great experiences on their own, but when you pair well, you end up with a truly exceptional dining experience.

The same principles used in wine pairing apply when choosing a beer to serve with fish. The important thing is to find something complementary that will not overpower the delicate nature of the seafood.

A lot of fish is very light, with a bright flavor and often made citrusy with lemon condiments and sauces.

With lighter white fishes, I like to serve crisp wheats. Two good ones are Boulevard Wheat or Goose Island 312 Urban Wheat. Both of these American wheats are crisp and citrusy, so they lend themselves well to seafood. And they will cut through the butter, if you’re topping it with a creamy sauce, and bring out the brightness of the fish.

Pale ales, such as Sierra Nevada Pale Ale or Mirror Pond from Deschutes Brewery, are also good for delicate white fish, like Pacific halibut.

I wouldn’t move too much out of the American wheats or American pale ales. They all have that citrusy note that lends itself well to any of the seafood. If you waiver too much, the beer will be overpowering and wash out the flavor of the fish.

As you move on to heartier fish, you want to step up the depth of beer. Shellfish can handle something maltier, like an IPA. Try to match the strength of the beer with the dish. The main thing is to make sure they work together.

For more traditional pairings, porters (like Central Waters Muddy Puppy Porter) and stouts (old-world Guinness is a good one) have a rich caramel quality that accentuates the creamy aspect of the seafood. Oysters and stouts go great together.