Seafood Documentaries You May Want To See

As a reader of Seafoodies, we know you care about responsibly sourced seafood. Hy-Vee works with FishWise to ensure that all efforts are supporting conservation through environmentally responsible business practices. Education is a large piece of our efforts. Hy-Vee strives to educate their employees and customers about seafood quality, safety and sustainability.

When you have time to enjoy a documentary, we recommend the following to expand your knowledge about the problems and challenges of our beautiful ocean ecosystems.

  1. Empty Oceans, Empty Nets
    According to pbs.org, Empty Oceans, Empty Nets explores the marine fisheries crisis and the pioneering efforts of fishermen, scientists and communities to sustain and restore these fisheries and our oceans. An ongoing international debate surrounds the complex problems and how best to solve them. Understanding why some fisheries are thriving while some are in most serious decline may be the key to averting an impending food crisis.

  2. The Last Ocean
    This film received many accolades throughout the industry. The film’s synopsis from the website: “The Ross Sea, Antarctica is the most pristine stretch of ocean on Earth. A vast, frozen landscape that teems with life – whales, seals and penguins carving out a place on the very edge of existence. Californian ecologist David Ainley has been traveling to the Ross Sea to study this unique ecosystem for more than 30 years. He has written scientific papers describing it as a “living laboratory.” Largely untouched by humans, it is one of the last places where the delicate balance of nature prevails. But an international fishing fleet has recently found its way to the Ross Sea and is targeting Antarctic toothfish, sold as Chilean sea bass in restaurants around the world.

    Please read about Hy-Vee’s Ross Sea pledge and decision to discontinue Chilean sea bass.

  3. The Breach
    The website says, “When fishing guide and filmmaker Mark Titus learns why wild salmon populations plummeted in his native Pacific Northwest, he embarks on a journey to discover where the fish have gone and what might bring them back. Along the way, Titus unravels a trail of human hubris, historical amnesia and potential tragedy looming in Alaska – all conspiring to end the most sustainable wild food left on the planet.”

Author: Kathleen Mullen-Ley

My name is Kathleen Mullen-Ley, and I am a project manager for FishWise. FishWise, a nonprofit sustainable seafood consultancy, has been working with Hy-Vee to research and recommend seafood product sourcing, develop and implement Hy-Vee's Responsible Choice Seafood materials and staff training, and analyze data to measure progress towards Hy-Vee's 2015 Commitment. I hold a master’s degree in marine biodiversity and conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a Bachelor of Arts in environmental studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. My graduate research project was an analysis of the World Trade Organization ruling on the U.S. dolphin-safe tuna label and its implications for future market-based marine conservation efforts. My experience analyzing fishery management issues and communicating marine science to diverse audiences combined with my respect for ocean life has made me well-prepared to take on the challenges of sustainable seafood.