USA Gulf Shrimp Etoufee

National Shrimp Day is May 10. Celebrate by enjoying classic Creole Etouffee made with the highest-quality Wild USA Gulf Shrimp available at your local Hy-Vee seafood counter.

Wild USA Gulf Shrimp Etouffee      

Serves 6

All you need:

½ cup butter
1½ cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped celery
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
½ cup flour
3 tbsp tomato paste
¼ tsp Tony Chachere’s Creole seasoning
2 cups seafood stock
3 pounds Wild USA Gulf shrimp, peeled and deveined
3 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup chopped green onion
2 tbsp chopped parsley
1/4 tsp black pepper
1 tsp salt
¼ tsp cayenne pepper
½ tsp hot sauce
3 cups cooked rice

All you do:

  1. Melt butter in a large pot, such as a Dutch oven. Add onion, celery and bell pepper. Sauté until vegetables are soft.
  2. Add flour. Stir often and cook for 8 to 10 minutes.
  3. Add tomato paste and Tony Chachere’s seasoning; cook for 10 more minutes stirring often.
  4. Add stock and bring to a boil. Add shrimp, garlic, green onion, parsley, black pepper, salt, cayenne pepper and hot sauce. Turn down heat and simmer for 10 minutes until shrimp are done. Remove from heat and let stand for 10 minutes.
  5. Serve over cooked rice. Enjoy!

Meet a Fisherman

Meet Captain Darin Gilman, one of the fishermen who catches Hy-Vee’s halibut, which is available in-store now. He fishes for Alaska Halibut, Copper River and Prince William Sound salmon, among other species. He is a year-round Alaska resident, born and raised in Cordova. He is a third-generation Alaska fisherman.

Photo credit: Copper River Prince William Sound Marketing Association

Seafood Sustainability 101

April is Earth Month, which means we should be thinking a little bit more about the world around us. Let’s take a deep dive into seafood sustainability and how you can play your part in supporting your health, by eating #Seafood2xWk, and the health of the environment, by eating sustainable #Seafood2xWk.

What is Sustainable Seafood?

Sustainable seafood means that it has been caught or farmed with minimal impact to the wild population or the environment. To be responsible stewards of the ocean, we need to make sure we are harvesting what we need today but that it will also be available in the future. It’s important to know where seafood comes from – whether from a wild fishery or farm – and it should only be coming from those that are utilizing thoughtful, science-based approaches to their management practices.

What Can You Do?

Try something new to help alleviate the potential of overfishing. Shrimp, salmon and tuna make up more than 50 percent of what we eat in America, but there are hundreds of other species commercially available.

Wild vs. Farmed

Americans would be in better health if we ate more seafood, but the only way to achieve that is through a combination of the wild population and farmed fish (also referred to as aquaculture). Sustainable seafood relies on both types.

There are good wild and farmed sustainable seafood options, and many benefits to farmed fish beyond just providing a healthy meal. Farmed fish can help with the recovery of natural fish populations, improve indigenous food supplies, increase the diversity of available seafood products, and provide a healthier alternative to land-based animal protein.

In the U.S., some of our favorite and most popular seafood options are farmed, such as oysters, clams, mussels, shrimp, catfish, trout, salmon and black sea bass. Farming fish, shellfish and even seaweed helps produce food while restoring habitats, replenishing wild stocks, and rebuilding populations of threatened and endangered species. Wild fish can also be sustainable, as long as they are not overfished.

What Can You Do?

There are many excellent seafood guides available (see here for a list of SNP’s partner organizations). A place to start is NOAA’s FishWatch.gov, where there is good information and resources for consumers on its website to learn about different species – both wild and farmed.

Feeling inspired?

Try this mussels recipe. It’s easy, tasty, affordable and, most importantly, sustainable. Enjoy!

 

Mussels In Garlic Broth

From: Seafood Nutrition Partnership’s Eating Heart Healthy Nutrition Program
Created By: Chef Kelly Armetta, Hyatt Regency Boston

Serves: 4

All you need:

  • 1 tsp olive oil
  • 4 garlic, cloves sliced
  • 2 tbsp onions, white or yellow, chopped
  • 2 pounds mussels, cleaned
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 tsp basil, dried
  • 1/2 tsp thyme, dried
  • 1/4 cup clam juice (optional)
  • 2 14.5-oz canned tomatoes, chopped
  • 2 tbsp butter, unsalted
  • salt & pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Heat large pot with olive oil and sliced garlic and onions.
  2. When aroma is released, add mussels.
  3. Add lemon juice, herbs and clam juice (optional). Gently toss.
  4. Add tomatoes. Cover and simmer over medium heat until mussels are steamed open, generally 3 to 6 minutes.
  5. Remove pot from heat. Discard unopened mussels.
  6. To finish mussels, add butter and swirl to make broth thicker. Season with salt and pepper if desired.
  7. Optional: Serve with crusty bread for dipping in broth.

Pacific Halibut

Pacific halibut is often considered America’s favorite white fish. You can find halibut on restaurant menus and in fresh seafood cases across the country. Alaska Pacific halibut is a mild, delicate and sweet-tasting white fish and is great for grilling at home during the summer. Uncooked, the meat should be almost translucent — not dull, yellowish or dry. When cooked, the snowy-white meat loses its glossy appearance and flakes at the touch of a fork. As an added bonus, its versatility in the kitchen is almost limitless. The thick, meaty flesh holds up well to a number of cooking methods and sauces, and it’s an ideal item to skewer for a summer barbecue.

Hy-Vee is pleased to label Alaska Pacific halibut as a Responsible Choice seafood item. Today, the only legal fishing method for commercial Pacific halibut fishermen is longline gear, aimed at the typical market size for this year’s catch of 10- to 15-pound halibut, which is much smaller than the 500-pound giants these flatfish can sometimes become.

Hy-Vee got its first taste of fresh Pacific halibut the week of opening season on March 26. All of our fish from Alaska are flown via Fed-Ex® overnight from Alaska to the Des Moines International Airport. After going through our U.S. Department of Commerce Inspection process at Perishable Distributors of Iowa (PDI), Hy-Vee stores have the opportunity to receive fresh halibut that has been out of Alaska waters for only 48 hours. That is quite a feat, especially in the Midwest.

Hy-Vee’s halibut is offloaded in Alaska. Photo courtesy of Copper River Seafood.

In general, the Alaska Pacific halibut commercial fisheries, including Hy-Vee’s primary vendor, Copper River Seafoods, are selective in the fish they catch because of the size of the hook needed to harvest such a large fish. Using a large hook generally reduces bycatch of smaller fish. Fishermen use circle hooks to increase catch rates and to improve the survival of any undersized halibut caught and released during commercial fishing. To reduce bycatch of other ground fish, regulations prohibit commercial Pacific halibut fisheries in specific depths and areas off the West Coast.

Although the Alaska Pacific halibut commercial fishery industry has changed substantially over the years, the science-based management of the fisheries has remained constant, sustaining this industry for nearly 100 years. This is another testament to the Alaska fisheries being some the best-managed sustainable fishery industries in the world. Because of its well-managed fisheries and practices, Hy-Vee is proud to label Alaska Pacific halibut with our Responsible Choice logo of approval.

Video credit: Chad Walling-Alaska Fisherman

Eat Smart And Add Seafood To Your Cart

People feel good about seafood — they agree it’s good for their health, it’s a perfect choice when they want something special or they love how it tastes. In fact, Americans are eating more seafood as they discover its great taste and healthy benefits. In 2017, a third of consumers reported they increased their fish consumption at home in the past year. Follow this link to find out why.

To learn more, visit seafoodnutrition.org.

 

 

Seafood: “Coming Attractions”

Spring is a great time for seafood! March means that many favorite seafood items are right around the corner. There is a lot to look forward to!

February/March usually brings the peak of crawfish season in the Bayou, providing the best, most tasty crawfish of the year. March also brings us the beginning of the fresh Alaska Halibut season. Fresh Alaska halibut is one of the best fish you can eat all year long. Ask your Hy-Vee fishmonger when he or she expects to get the first fresh Alaska halibut of the season.

March will bring Bairdi crab, which has had a “boom or bust” history. Last year was a bust and the fishery was closed. This year, however, the fishery opened up in late 2017 and we are just now getting product into the stores. If you have never had Bairdi crab, I would encourage you to give it try. It is related to the snow crab, however it tends to be bigger and sweeter in flavor. In fact, many crab-lovers prefer the Bairdi crab to any other crab. You should see this item in-store now.

April brings us 100 percent Natural Wild Gulf Shrimp season, providing us with the best-tasting shrimp anywhere! May means that Wild Alaskan salmon season is just around the corner! It begins with the Copper River fishery opening and the rush of fresh wild Alaskan Sockeye and King salmon.

Spring is in the air and it can only mean that your local Hy-Vee fishmonger will have plenty of in-season seafood options for you to choose from. See you soon!

Shrimp and Corn Soup

All you need:

  • 5 tbsp canola oil
  • 4 tbsp flour
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 2 tbsp parsley, minced
  • 2 pounds shrimp; peeled, deveined and chopped
  • 1/8 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 dash hot sauce
  • 1 can of whole tomatoes chopped
  • 1 can whole kernel corn (not drained)
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 2 cups seafood stock
  • salt & pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Using a large pot or a Dutch oven, add the oil and flour and cook on medium heat, stirring often, until golden brown.
  2. Add onions and sauté for 10 minutes, stirring often. Add bell pepper, green onion, parsley, cayenne pepper and hot sauce. Then add chopped shrimp, stirring often. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  3. Add canned corn, chopped tomatoes, both stocks and salt & pepper. Simmer for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Enjoy!

Dish On Fish: Seafood Information

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

From Dish on Fish: Mediterranean-Style Baked Tilapia

If you’re ready to take on the Mediterranean-style diet, here are a few recipes that are perfect for all occasions. This Mediterranean-Style Baked Tilapia recipe from Diethood is both easy and elegant, making it ideal for everything from a family meal to an intimate date night. While you enjoy this savory dish, which is generously topped with olives and tomatoes, you can rest easy knowing it’s full of healthy ingredients. A lean white fish, tilapia is low in fat and high in protein. This fish will also help nourish your body with nutrients like potassium, selenium, phosphorus, vitamin B12, vitamin B6 and vitamin D. Pair it with one of your favorite side dishes for the perfect weeknight dinner. How’s that for a balanced meal?

Recipe: https://diethood.com/mediterranean-style-baked-tilapia/

Clam Chowder Day Recipe

Serves 8

All you need:

  • 15 raw clams (2 to 2-1/2 pounds) or 6 oz canned clams
  • add 5 (8 oz each) bottles clam juice
  • add 10 slices Hy-Vee bacon, chopped
  • add 1/2 Vidalia onion, chopped
  • add 4 tbsp Hy-Vee butter
  • add 1 c. Hy-Vee flour
  • add 5 medium Hy-Vee russet potatoes, peeled and diced
  • add 1/2 c. Hy-Vee skim milk
  • add 1/2 c. Hy-Vee half-and-half
  • add 1 tsp Hy-Vee salt
  • add Hy-Vee ground black pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. If using raw clams, soak in fresh water for 20 minutes. Scrub shells. In a stock pot with lid, bring 1 cup water to boiling. Add clams and steam for 10 to 15 minutes, removing the clams as they open. Discard any that do not open. Remove clams from shells, chop and set aside; discard shells.
  2. Heat clam juice in a large saucepan on medium heat.
  3. Fry bacon in a large skillet until crispy. Remove and crumble bacon, reserving drippings. Add onions to skillet. Cook over medium heat until translucent. Add butter, bacon and flour to onions and cook, stirring continuously, for 5 minutes.
  4. Increase heat on clam juice to medium-high. Add onion mixture to saucepan while whisking continuously. Continue stirring to ensure no lumps form. Add clams and stir. Add potatoes, milk, half-and-half and salt.
  5. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 35 minutes, stirring frequently.
  6. Season to taste with black pepper.

Dish On Fish: Seafood Information

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

From Dish on Fish: Four Elegant Date-Night Seafood Recipes

We all have some simple, go-to seafood meals we rely on, but special occasions are the perfect time to venture out of your cooking comfort zone and try something new! We’ve scoured the Internet for the most elegant seafood meals to serve your special someone. From shrimp and scallops to halibut, salmon and lobster, take your pick!

Looking for more simple seafood meals for two? Head over to last year’s post for further inspiration.

Garlic Orzo Tuscan Shrimp for Two – Zona CooksSriracha-Glazed Seared Scallops – Peas and CrayonsSeafood Fra Diavolo – Host the ToastPan-Seared Halibut with Kentucky Bourbon – Champagne Tastes