Recipe Spotlight: Feature Responsible Choice Seafood at Your End-of-the-Summer Blowout

Summer is slipping away and soon the kids will be back in school or leaving to return to their college dorms.

If you want to close out the season with a luau or other end-of-summer party, this is a good and quick recipe featuring Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood.

It starts with Belize shrimp, but you can also switch out the shrimp and marinate fresh mahi mahi as well.


Coconut Lime Belize Shrimp Skewers

All you need:

  • 1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp freshly grated lime zest
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 (14 oz) can coconut milk
  • 2 pounds Responsible Choice Belize shrimp (31- to 40-ct), peeled and deveined
  • 12 to 14 long wooden skewers
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • fresh lime wedges, for squeezing and garnish
  • 1/2 cup toasted, sweetened shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves

All you do:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine ginger, garlic, lime zest and juice, and coconut milk. Add shrimp, tossing to coat, and chill, covered, for 1 to 3 hours.
  2. Meanwhile, soak skewers in water. Prepare a grill for high heat (450 to 550 degrees; you can hold your hand 5 inches above cooking grate only 2 to 4 seconds). Push 5 shrimp onto each skewer; cook, turning once, until flesh has just turned pink and is slightly charred, about 3 minutes on each side.
  3. Arrange skewers on a serving platter and sprinkle evenly with salt, a squeeze of lime juice, coconut and cilantro leaves. Serve with extra lime wedges on the side.

Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood Species Come from the U.S. Side of the Gulf of Mexico, Where Fisheries are Well Managed

John Rohrs here:

When Hy-Vee customers buy Responsible Choice seafood from the Gulf of Mexico, it’s predominantly from the U.S. side, where fisheries maintain quota systems and meet Monterey Bay Aquarium’s criterion for management.

One of the biggest factors affecting fin fish from the Gulf is sport fishing. Sportsmen and women are required to buy licenses, but it still has a huge effect on stocks. Between a combination of commercial fishing and recreational fishing, there is a great pressure on fin fish.

Some of the species customers will get from the Gulf include fish from the grouper family. We also bring in some American red snapper, but years of overfishing – it’s also one of the top species for sport fishing – make it a work in progress. It’s a long-living, late-maturing fish, so it will take time for stocks to rebound.

Kathleen Mullen-Ley here:

Hy-Vee’s wild shrimp also comes from Gulf of Mexico and meets the commitment to responsibly source all seafood by the end of 2015 because the species is in a comprehensive fishery improvement project.

Here’s the problem:
Many commercial fishing boats are complying with federal law that requires the use of turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in federal and state waters, but Louisiana has a state law that prohibits enforcement of the federal law.

All of the shrimp caught in the Gulf is processed together, meaning the shrimp caught in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida is commingled with the shrimp caught in Louisiana. So because that Louisiana law is on the books, we can’t say Gulf wild shrimp is Responsible Choice, even though many fisheries are using TEDs.

Legislative efforts are continuing to bring everyone into compliance and end the political power struggle.

Recipe Spotlight: Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Shrimp Tacos with Corn Salsa

Sweet corn and summer are synonymous. It’s in such abundance this year that you’ve probably boiled it, microwaved it and grilled it.

If you and your family are looking for a way to enjoy the iconic taste of summer and Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood, this recipe gets you to your goal.

It is a simple and refreshing recipe that brings out the fresh taste of sweet corn, and some of summer’s other garden bounties. This would be a great recipe if you have any sweet corn left over from a grill-out the night before.

These tacos are not spicy, but the shrimp have some nice bold flavors to contrast with the simple fresh ingredients of the salsa.


Shrimp Tacos with Corn Salsa

Serves 4.

All you need:

Corn Salsa

  • 2 ears sweet corn
  • 1/2 cup diced red pepper
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled, pitted, diced
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin

Shrimp Tacos

  • 1 pound raw Hy-Vee Responsible Choice shrimp (16- to 20-count)
  • 1 tbsp agave nectar
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp cumin
  • 8 flour taco shells

All you do:

  1. To cook the corn, place in boiling water for 5 to 7 minutes. Cool; cut the kernels from the cob. To prepare the salsa, place the corn, red pepper, green onion, avocado, lime juice, salt, black pepper and cumin in a medium bowl and mix until all incorporated. Set aside in refrigerator.
  2. To prepare the shrimp, thaw, peel and devein shrimp. In a large skillet add the shrimp, agave nectar, paprika, salt, chili powder and cumin; stir to evenly distribute seasonings. Cook shrimp for about 1 to 3 minutes on each side, until shrimp is opaque. Remove from heat.
  3. To prepare the taco, place 3 to 4 shrimp on each taco shell. Add about 1/4 cup corn salsa on top.

With its Responsible Choice Initiative and Fishery Improvement Projects, Hy-Vee is Raising the Bar

One of the key goals of Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice initiative is to help the seafood industry improve and help those fisheries and farms that are not performing at sustainable levels improve in discrete ways. To promote healthy oceans and ensure a long-term seafood supply, Hy-Vee is continuing to encourage its seafood suppliers to participate in fishery improvement projects (FIPs).

FIPs are an important component of Hy-Vee’s Seafood Procurement Policy as they provide a direct pathway for Hy-Vee to encourage improvements on the water, be that through strengthening fisheries management policies or by providing incentives for fishers to reduce the environmental impacts of their fishing gear.

What that means to the consumer is that though products from these fisheries may not currently meet the definition of “responsibly sourced” and be eligible for the Responsible Choice label, they still meet Hy-Vee’s 2015 Responsible Sourcing Commitment because they are in a “time-bound improvement process.”

These improvements may range from an internal agreement between FishWise and Hy-Vee about a particular seafood sourcing strategy, particularly for aquaculture, to external, multi-stakeholder efforts to improve a fishery, such as a fishery improvement project. In general, for an improvement project to meet Hy-Vee’s 2015 Commitment it must contain:

  • A time-bound component that establishes a clear objective consistent with the Seafood Procurement Policy
  • A work-plan with measurable indicators
  • A date by which the necessary improvements are to be achieved
  • Fishery improvement projects must meet the Guidelines for Supporting Improvement Projects established by the Conservation Alliance for Seafood Solutions (available here)

The important takeaway for consumers is that Hy-Vee is doing important work on the water, whether encouraging fisheries to use different gear or implement new management plans that will move them toward sustainability.

It’s important to support those fisheries that are already doing a good job, but it’s just as important to work with those that are struggling to improve through FIPs. This is an important way that retailers can drive improvement. Without support from retailers, they don’t have the motivation to improve.

Recipe Spotlight: Claw into Lobster Mac-and-Cheese Three Ways

The ultimate comfort food, mac-and-cheese has made a comeback over the past decade, showing up everywhere from casual cafes to upscale restaurants.

To sort Hy-Vee’s mac-and-cheese out from the crowd, we’re offering some new twists that combine the down-home staple with the indulgence of Responsible Choice lobster and swanky gourmet cheeses.

If you’re worried about carbohydrate-rich foodstuffs, a healthier-choice recipe is included that uses whole grain pasta, nonfat milk and Greek yogurt, part-skim mozzarella cheese and some organic ingredients.


Five-Cheese Lobster Mac with Tomato Pancetta Jam

All you need:

  • 1 pound elbow macaroni noodles
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 leek (white part only), chopped
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 tsp ground mustard
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 4 oz chevre cheese (goat cheese)
  • 4 oz Grand Reserve white cheddar
  • 4 oz Tillamook sharp yellow cheddar
  • 4 oz St. Angel Brie cheese
  • 4 oz Bel Paese cheese
  • 1/2 to 3/4 pound cooked Responsible Choice lobster meat, chopped
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Cook pasta according to package directions. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. In a saucepan, melt butter; add leek and sweat, stirring frequently, not allowing it to brown, for 1 to 2 minutes.
  3. Whisk in the flour, ground mustard and garlic powder to create a thick paste. Whisk in milk and cream; bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, stirring constantly.
  4. Once it begins to bubble, immediately remove from heat and add in the goat cheese, cheddars, Brie and Bel Paese, stirring until all the cheese is melted and smooth. Gently fold in lobster meat; season to taste with salt and pepper.
  5. Spray a 9-by-13-inch pan with nonstick spray. Place cooked noodles in the pan; pour the cheese sauce over the pasta and stir until everything is evenly mixed. Bake in a 400-degree oven for about 10 minutes, until the cheese is bubbly and starting to brown. Serve mac and cheese with Tomato Pancetta Jam, recipe below.

The Tomato Pancetta Jam

All you need:

  • 3 tbsp butter
  • 2 large shallots, chopped
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes
  • 1 3/4 cups white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 4 oz diced pancetta, cooked and drained

All you do:

  1. In a saucepan, melt butter. Add shallots; sweat for 1 to 2 minutes. Add tomatoes, vinegar, sugars, water, salt and pepper.
  2. Allow to simmer for 25 to 30 minutes or until reduced and syrupy. Once finished, stir in pancetta and allow to cool.

Healthier Choice Lobster Mac-and-Cheese

  • 8 oz whole grain rotini pasta
  • 4 1/2 tbsp organic Kalona butter, divided
  • 2 small leeks, white part only, chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • 1 cup Full Circle organic nonfat milk
  • 1/2 cup nonfat Greek yogurt
  • 8 oz Organic Valley part-skim mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 1/4 cup Organic Valley raw sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup low-fat Greek yogurt
  • 1/2 tsp paprika
  • 1/3 pound cooked Responsible Choice lobster meat, chopped
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp whole wheat bread crumbs
  • 4 cups baby arugula
  • 1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
  • squeeze of fresh lemon
  • 1 tbsp olive oil

All you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 3-quart baking dish with nonstick cooking spray and set aside. Cook rotini according to package and set aside.
  2. In a large saucepan, melt 1/2 tablespoon butter; add leeks and garlic and sweat for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the pan and set aside.
  3. In the same pan, melt remaining butter; add flour and cook for 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Slowly whisk in milk and 1/2 cup Greek yogurt until mixture is thick. Remove from heat and add 6 ounces mozzarella, sharp cheddar cheese and remaining 1/4 cup low-fat Greek yogurt; mix well.
  4. Add the leeks, pasta and paprika to the sauce and stir to combine. Gently fold in lobster meat; season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour mixture into prepared baking dish; sprinkle with bread crumbs and remaining 2 ounces mozzarella cheese. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until cheese is bubbly and bread crumbs have browned.
  5. In a separate bowl, combine baby arugula, tomatoes, lemon and olive oil; season with salt and pepper.
  6. To serve: Serve macaroni and cheese topped with the baby arugula salad.

Lobster Mac & Cheese Carbonara

All you need:

  • Unsalted butter, for the baking dish
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 slices bacon, cut into small dice
  • 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp all-purpose flour
  • 5 cups whole milk, or more if needed, heated until hot
  • 4 large egg yolks, lightly whisked
  • 2 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 cups (8 oz) grated Asiago cheese, plus 1/4 cup for top
  • 1 1/2 cups (6 oz) grated white cheddar, plus 1/4 cup for top
  • 1 1/2 cups (6 oz) grated yellow cheddar, plus 1/4 cup for top
  • 1 cup (4 oz) grated fontina cheese, plus 1/4 cup for top
  • 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, plus 1/4 cup for top
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1 pound elbow macaroni, cooked just under al dente
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
  • 1/2 to 3/4 pound cooked Responsible Choice lobster meat, chopped

All you do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Butter the bottom and sides of a 10-by-10-by-2-inch baking dish and set aside.
  2. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add the bacon and cook until golden brown on all sides, about 8 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a plate lined with paper towels. Add the garlic to the fat in the pan and cook until light golden brown, 1 minute.
  3. Whisk in the flour and cook for 1 to 2 minutes. Whisk in the hot milk, raise the heat to high and cook, whisking constantly, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the egg yolks until incorporated and let cook for 1 to 2 minutes.
  4. Remove from the heat and whisk in the thyme, cayenne and all the different cheeses (but not the topping amounts) until completely melted. Season with salt and pepper. If the mixture appears too thick, add additional warm milk, 1/4 cup at a time.
  5. Put the cooked macaroni in a large bowl. Add the cheese sauce, reserved bacon and parsley. Gently fold in lobster meat and season to taste with salt and pepper. Transfer to the prepared baking dish. Combine an additional 1/4 cup each of Asiago, cheddars, fontina and Parmesan in a bowl, and sprinkle evenly over the top. Bake until the dish is heated through and the top is a light golden brown, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and let rest for 10 minutes before serving.

Pacific Seafood is Safe to Eat, Radiation Fears Three Years after Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan are Overblown

Consumer fears, many of them passed along virally on the internet, that fish from the Pacific Ocean contain unhealthy amounts of radiation are still persistent more than three years after a tsunami swamped the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan.

Those concerns are overblown.

FishWise is continuing to follow the status of the radioactive plume of seawater from the power plant and its potential to contaminate Pacific seafood. Based on the best scientific information available, consuming Pacific seafood is still safe.

Among the agencies and groups testing the seafood are the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which routinely tests for radionuclides – or radioactive contaminants – and monitors information and data from foreign governments and international organizations. In March 2014, the FDA released this update on its website:

“To date, FDA has no evidence that radionuclides from the Fukushima incident are present in the U.S. food supply at levels that would pose a public health concern. This is true for both FDA-regulated food products imported from Japan and U.S. domestic food products, including seafood caught off the coast of the United States. Consequently, FDA is not advising consumers to alter their consumption of specific foods imported from Japan or domestically produced foods, including seafood. …”

The FDA is continuing its monitoring, as is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which measures levels of radiation in the air and precipitation through its RadNet program.

Scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts are leading a volunteer radiation-monitoring project, called Our Radioactive Ocean, which said in a June 2014 statement:

“So far, none of the seawater samples taken from the Pacific Coast have contained any trace of radiation from Fukushima. They have contained the same levels of radiation that were evident in the Pacific Ocean before the Fukushima accident.”

A number of peer-reviewed studies also support our confidence that seafood from the Pacific is safe to eat.

Researchers involved in Kelp Watch 2014, a project that includes testing for radionuclide contamination of kelp forest ecosystems at multiple locations along the West coast are also confident that the radiation concentration found in kelp samples that will bioaccumulate in the food web that humans are part of will be so low as to pose no harm to human health.

Since the April 2011 disaster, a radioactive plume of contaminated seawater has been carried toward the West Coast of North America by ocean currents, but the Pacific is such a vast body of water that rapid dilution of the radioactive seawater means the concentration of radionuclides from Fukushima is expected to be only slightly above pre-accident levels, and far below naturally occurring radioactive elements in the ocean from environmental factors such as sunlight and weathering of rocks.

The takeaway from these and other findings for consumers of Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood is that Pacific seafood is safe to eat. The risks of Fukushima-derived radiation are miniscule when compared to other things that threaten public health – for example smoking, air pollution and obesity, to name a few.

This vigilant testing has had a benefit beyond providing consumers with the assurances about the safety of seafood: It’s allowed scientists to deepen their knowledge and understanding of the migratory patterns of tuna.

Read more on the FishWise blog.

Recipe Spotlight: For Lighter Summer Fare, Try Salads and Ceviches with Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Seafood

During the summer months, salads and ceviches are often the main dish. By including Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood with the lighter fare, you can be assured that you and your family are getting healthy proteins and Omega-3 fatty acids.

The recipes below include one for ceviche (pronounced “seh-VEE-chay”), a Latin American favorite made with raw fish and seafood marinated in citrus juice, primarily lime and lemon juices. Before you wrinkle your nose and purse your lips, keep this in mind: The acid in the citrus juice coagulates the proteins in the fish, effectively cooking the seafood.


Responsible Choice Tuna and Avocado Ceviche

All you need:

  • 3/4 pound Responsible Choice ahi tuna
  • 2 limes, juiced
  • 1/4 red pepper, cut in small dice
  • 1/2 small red onion, cut in small dice
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 tbsp sriracha hot chili sauce, or to taste
  • 1 avocado, cubed*
  • 1 to 2 tbsp minced fresh cilantro
  • Tortilla chips, for serving

All you do:

  1. Dice the tuna into small cubes and place into a glass bowl. Squeeze the limes over the tuna. Add the red pepper, onion, a small amount of salt and black pepper and sriracha. Cover and let marinate for about 1 hour in the refrigerator.
  2. Just before serving, add the avocado and cilantro, and adjust the salt and pepper if necessary. Serve with tortilla chips.
  3.  Chef’s tip: To serve, save the avocado shells and fill with the ceviche.

Grilled Responsible Choice Ahi Tuna Chopped Salad

All you need:

  • 1 pound Responsible Choice sesame crusted tuna, from the Hy-Vee seafood case
  • 2 (12 oz each) bags Dole chopped Asian blend salad
  • 1 small red pepper, diced small
  • 1 to 2 jalapeños, minced
  • 1 small bunch scallions, sliced thinly on a bias
  • 2 mangoes, cut in medium dice
  • 1 (12 oz) bottle Walden Farms sesame ginger vinaigrette

All you do:

  1. Using an outdoor grill or indoor grill pan, grill tuna 2 to 3 minutes per side, not cooked all the way through, as it is best served rare to medium-rare. Remove and keep warm.
  2. In a large bowl, add the chopped Asian Blend, diced red pepper, jalapeños, green onions and mango. Toss with the vinaigrette, just enough to coat the vegetables.
  3. Carefully break the tuna up and fold into the slaw. Serve as a side or as a main course.

Seafood Salad with Strawberry and Watermelon Vinaigrette

All you need

Dressing:

  • 1/4 to 1/2 pound watermelon (to equal 1 cup pureed)
  • 1/4 to 1/2 pound fresh strawberries (to equal 1 cup pureed)
  • 2 tbsp red or white wine or balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tbsp honey, more or less depending on the sweetness of the fruit
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 2 tbsp fresh cilantro
  • 2 tbsp fresh mint
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

Salad:

  • About 16 ounces Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood (salmon, raw shrimp or crab)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tbsp garlic powder
  • Grapeseed oil or a little olive oil and butter, for sautéing
  • About 8 cups mixed greens
  • 1/2 pound fresh strawberries, sliced
  • 1/2 pound fresh watermelon, rind removed, cubed or cut into small triangles
  • 1 English cucumber, seeded and sliced thinly
  • 1/2 small red onion, cut into slivers
  • About 1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese

All you do:

  1. To make the vinaigrette: In a blender or food processor, add the strawberries and watermelon. (You will need about 1/4 to 1/2 pound of each fruit to equal 2 cups puree.) Strain the mixture.
  2. To the same blender, add the vinegar, honey, lime juice, cilantro, mint and the 2 cups fruit puree. With the motor running, drizzle in the olive oil. Start with a little oil, and add more if needed. Taste to see if more honey is needed. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. For the seafood: Season with salt, pepper and garlic powder. Add oil to a hot pan; omit if using crab. If using salmon, cook for about 4 to 5 minutes on each side. For shrimp, cook just until they turn pink, about 3 to 4 minutes. If using crab meat, don’t cook; just add to the salad before serving.
  4. To serve: Place mixed greens on platter or plate. In a decorative fashion, arrange strawberries, watermelon, cucumber, red onion and seafood. Drizzle vinaigrette over the top; add the feta.

Courtesy of Chef Jess (makes about 2 1/2 cups)

Only 6 Months Old, Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood Initiative is Already a Success Story

Six months into Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood program – our pledge to responsibly source all fresh and Hy-Vee brand seafood by the end of 2015 – we’re ahead of where we thought we would be.

We’re not the only ones who think so. Greenpeace USA ranked us No. 5 among the country’s top 26 retailers for our efforts in its Carting Away the Oceans: 2014 Rankings of Seafood Sustainability in U.S. Supermarkets report. That’s quite an accomplishment, and it’s the people who work at Hy-Vee and Perishable Distributors of Iowa (PDI) who give me the confidence to say that at this time next year, we will have made good on our pledge.

Some reasons:

Behind-the-scenes work building on already solid relationships with our partners for two years made for a smooth roll-out of the initiative earlier this year. We made sure our vendors were on board and all of our suppliers were on the same page as far as understanding what kind of product we need to meet the goals of our Seafood Procurement Policy.

One big surprise was how willing our vendors were to change with us. We’ve never had a procurement policy as strict as this one, but we found that suppliers are looking ahead at their futures as well. They are as interested as we are in doing the right thing to protect the oceans and the marine life that depend on them for survival.

Another surprise was that we only had to drop a few suppliers. We were afraid going into this initiative that we might have to abandon some long-standing relationships, but that wasn’t the case.

The few we did have to drop because their products just couldn’t be purchased under our Policy – a last resort – were very low-volume suppliers of specialty items.

One of the benefits of this program is that issues that were only whispered about are now front of mind among our employees and customers. It was an “out of sight, out of mind” type thing.”

We’ve heard about the issues affecting the world’s oceans, but may not have taken the risks all that seriously. As a result of this initiative, we’ve all become more aware of what is going on and we truly understand the issues fisheries deal with and how they’re engaged in doing the right thing.

There are still some challenges with some species, and educating the public about farm-raised salmon is one of the biggest ones. It’s a hot topic among consumers, and what they primarily hear is negative.

They’re not aware of all the good the farm-raised salmon industry has done to protect wild species. Salmon is one of the most sought-after seafood species in the world, and wild stocks can’t begin to cover the demand.

It’s a matter of increasing consumer awareness.

Implementing a holistic Responsible Seafood Program isn’t something you flip a switch on overnight. But overall, we’ve done a great job and achieved great success in a short time.

Recipe Spotlight: Using Responsible Choice Alaska Seafood Will Make You Forget What You Think You Know About Salmon Burgers

Forget what you think you know about wild salmon burgers. That flat-tasting concoction Grandma mixed up with some crushed crackers and eggs, then fried to a hard crust in a pan of, gasp, lard is so old school.

Wild salmon burgers are light years ahead of where they once were.

This recipe has spice, but it’s not considered spicy. Full of flavor, it will please the palates of almost everyone. Top the wild salmon burger with avocado, red onion and tomatoes for a delicious and refreshing dinner.

The key is to start with Responsible Choice wild Alaska salmon, which will be available fresh in the Hy-Vee seafood counter through early fall.

This recipe can be cooked on the grill or in a skillet on the stove. And, guys, you’ll feel like you’re grasping a big thick burger, but it’s better for you, loaded with heart-healthy Omega-3 fatty acids.

Salmon Burger

All you need:

  • 1 pound skinless Responsible Choice wild Alaska salmon fillets, cut into 2-inch cubes
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tbsp fresh cilantro
  • 1 tsp blackened seasoning
  • 1/3 to 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  • Buns and toppings, for serving

All you do:

  1. In a food processor, pulse salmon, egg, Worcestershire sauce, cilantro, blackened seasoning and bread crumbs until salmon is finely chopped.
  2. Form into 4 patties. Heat grill to medium-high heat or place the patties in a hot skillet and cook for about 5 to 7 minutes on each side. Serve on a bun with your favorite toppings. Try avocado, tomato and red onion.

Hy-Vee’s Commitment to Responsible Choice Seafood doesn’t Stop at the Seafood Case; It Continues into Market Grille Restaurants

When dining out, the source of seafood entrees is always a gamble. Unless it’s specifically noted, there’s no way of knowing if the seafood was raised and caught using responsible methods.

logo1That’s not the case at Hy-Vee’s in-store, sit-down Market Grille restaurants, currently found at eight locations, but on tap at up to 50 stores in our Midwest market over the next three years.

The Responsible Choice initiative – Hy-Vee’s pledge to responsibly source all of its fresh and frozen Hy-Vee brand seafood by the end of 2015 – doesn’t end at the seafood case. The push is consistent throughout the company and the Market Grille restaurants are no exception.

So when diners order any of our entrees containing wild Alaska salmon (grilled and in Caesar salads), seared scallops, Ahi tuna or potato crusted cod, they do so with the confidence of knowing that other sea life wasn’t harmed when the fish was caught.

The menus at our Market Grille restaurants will change every 10 months, but what won’t change is our commitment to Responsible Choice seafood. You can find Responsible Choice items by looking for the circular logo.

If you’re not familiar with the Market Grille concept, they can be found in several of our stores. Hy-Vee also has one stand-alone Market Grille, located in the lovingly restored historic Hotel Charitone in Chariton, Hy-Vee’s longtime home.

The full-service Market Grille restaurants offer customers a sit-down dining experience with a wait staff and alcoholic beverages. In addition to Responsible Choice seafood, the menu includes steaks, half-pound handcrafted burgers, entrée salads, ribs and other smoked meats, pizza and other items prepared in an open kitchen.