Hy-Vee Nets Prestigious National Recognition for Environmentally Responsible Seafood Ffforts

We did it! In the Carting Away the Oceans: 2014 Rankings of Seafood Sustainability in U.S. Supermarkets report released last week by Greenpeace USA, Hy-Vee’s seafood sustainability efforts are ranked fifth among the country’s top 26 retailers. The report evaluates major U.S. retailers for the sustainability of their seafood in four key areas: policy, initiatives, labeling and transparency, and Red List inventory.

greenpeace

According to the report, “Hy-Vee’s remarkable entrance can be credited to the seafood team’s internal drive and proactive approach to seafood sustainability, coupled with corporate-level endorsement and confidence in its category staff.”

“We were surprised at how well Hy-Vee performed, by essentially rocketing to fifth place, which is a particularly impressive showing for a new entrant to the evaluations,” said James Mitchell, Greenpeace senior seafood campaigner.

Thank you to the Hy-Vee team who worked on this initiative, as well as our customers who support these efforts through purchasing responsible choice items. We could not have done this without each of you, and we look forward to continually improving our offerings in the future!

Recipe Spotlight: Make Restaurant-Quality Sushi at Home with Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood

Sushi’s meteoric rise into the mainstream over the past several years hasn’t occurred without some environmental risks, as some of the most desirable species for sushi are overfished or caught using methods that threaten other sea life.

The recipe below uses Hy-Vee Responsible Choice ahi tuna, offered to customers as part of our commitment to source 100 percent of our fresh and Hy-Vee brand frozen seafood and fish from responsible fisheries and farms.

If you’re new to making sushi in your own kitchen, here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • The No. 1 thing to do to make restaurant-style sushi at home is to choose the freshest fish possible.
  • Keep the area clean while working to avoid cross contamination.
  • Use a sharp knife to cut the fish, then wipe the blade with a damp cloth between cuts. This keeps the fish from sticking to the knife.
  • Dip your fingers in water as you roll the sushi to keep the rice from sticking to your hands.

One common misconception about sushi is that the word refers to raw fish. It’s true that many, but certainly not all, sushi recipes call for raw fish, but the word “sushi” itself refers to the vinegared rice.

If you’re shy about raw fish, try tempura sushi, made by dipping the entire roll in a light batter and briefly frying it. But one way to take the fear out of eating raw fish is choose sushi-grade fish that is FDA-certified as being frozen at 4 degrees below zero, such as Responsible Choice ahi or yellowfin tuna. Keep it as cold as possible.

Sushi offers a great opportunity to be adventuresome and blend different tastes to create an entirely new taste. I call it fusion sushi. Responsible Choice Copper River wild Alaskan salmon available in select Hy-Vee stores now is a great choice for fusion sushi.

You can top the sushi with anything you want – for example, add the sweetness of mango salsa to the spicy tuna – and put your own spin on a classic. It’s fun to adapt recipes to regional locales and give it a name that reflects that area’s traditions.


Spicy Tuna Roll

Makes 4 rolls

All you need:

  • 6 cups prepared sushi rice, cooled
  • 1/2 pound Responsible Choice ahi tuna
  • Sriracha hot sauce, as needed
  • 1/2 bunch scallions, sliced thinly
  • 4 sheets nori, seaweed sheets available in the Hy-Vee HealthMarket
  • 1 tbsp white sesame seeds, divided, optional

All you do:

  1. Prepare rice ahead of time.
  2. Chop tuna and mix with hot sauce and green onions. Set aside.
  3. Lay a nori sheet down on a bamboo mat and spread one-fourth of the sushi rice on top of the nori sheet. Sprinkle one-fourth of sesame seeds on top of the rice.
  4. Place one-fourth of the tuna mixture lengthwise on the rice. Roll up the bamboo mat, pressing forward to shape the sushi into a cylinder. Press the bamboo mat firmly and remove it from the sushi.
  5. Repeat the process to make 3 more rolls.
  6. Tips: When rolling the sushi, dip your fingertips in a bowl of water, to help the rice from sticking to your hand. Before slicing, carefully wipe knife with a wet towel. Cut roll in half, then each half into 2 to 3 pieces.

Copper River Salmon, the Best of the Alaskan Catch, is on Its Way to Select Markets

Salmon lovers, this is what you’ve been waiting for: highly prized fresh Copper River/Prince William Sound salmon will be available at select Hy-Vee stores starting May 21, signaling the beginning of the 2014 wild salmon season in Alaska.

From now through fall, Hy-Vee customers will find some of the best of the catch in the fresh seafood counter at selected stores. It’s all Responsible Choice, a strong start to our commitment to responsibly source all fresh and Hy-Vee brand fish and seafood by the end of 2015.

Because it’s from Alaska, where sustainability of the seafood industry – the state’s largest employer – is so important it’s written into the state Constitution, our customers also have the satisfaction of knowing that the salmon comes from the best managed fisheries in the world.

The Copper River salmon from Cordova, AK, has an intense taste that comes from the size of the Copper River, one of the largest rivers in the world, and its cold waters, and it is considered the best salmon on the market.

The Copper River/Prince William Sound Marketing Association has done a fantastic marketing job. Alaska Airlines flies in the first ceremonial fish to Seattle, where some of the cities top executive chefs compete for the best salmon recipe in a now annual tradition known as the Copper Chef Cook-Off.

All that hype has made Copper River such a recognizable brand that out customers sometimes mistakenly refer to it as a species instead of a geographic area. There are three species of salmon in the Copper River District, and this year, it’s estimated that 1.60 million sockeye, 22,000 king salmon, and 280,000 Coho will be caught in the short, 4 to 6 week season.

Various factors can affect the total catch, including careful monitoring of the salmon run by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Officials want to make sure enough salmon escape to make their return not only their natal river to spawn, but to the exact spot of their birth.

As the wild salmon season progresses, Hy-Vee’s customers will see various other species of salmon showing up in the seafood case. As more becomes available, prices will adjust accordingly.

Recipe Spotlight: Whether with Spicy or Summery Sauce, Swordfish is Perfect for the Grill

If you’re looking for a perfect grilling fish, Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice swordfish may be it. It is always sold as steaks, and the meat is so firm, and well, meaty, that many many non-fish eaters will gladly eat swordfish.

Its firm texture also helps prevent the steaks from falling apart on the grill, a huge plus.

Cook swordfish like you would a rare steak: Use high heat to sear the outside, and let it stay a little rare in the middle. I cook it about 5 minutes on one side, then 4 to 5 minutes on the other for an inch-thick steak. The uneven time gives you a great sear on one side (the side you serve facing up) while not overcooking the swordfish.

Make sure to leave the skin on when you grill, but take it off to serve. The skin is rubbery, but it helps keep the meat moist.


Grilled Swordfish with Red Curry Coconut Sauce

All you need:

  • 1 1/4 cups coconut milk, divided
  • 3 1/2 tbsp red curry paste, divided
  • 1 tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 tsp light brown sugar
  • squeeze of fresh lime
  • 4 swordfish steaks, about 2 pounds
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped green onion, for garnish
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish
  • Grilled baby bok choy and steamed rice, for serving

All  you do:

  1. Scoop 1/4 cup coconut cream from the top of the chilled coconut milk and transfer it to a small saucepan. Place over medium heat and bring to a boil. Add 2 tablespoons curry paste and cook, stirring constantly, until very fragrant, 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in the remaining 1 cup coconut milk to achieve a smooth consistency and slowly incorporate it into the curry paste mixture.
  2. Add the fish sauce, soy sauce, sugar and lime juice. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, and adjust the heat to maintain a simmer. Cook, stirring frequently, until thickened to a thin sauce consistency, 5 to 10 minutes. Set aside.
  3. Prepare the grill for direct heat cooking over medium-high heat. Season the swordfish steaks with salt, pepper and olive oil and place on clean grill grates. Grill 4 to 5 minutes per side with the lid closed until fish flakes easily with a fork. Serve the swordfish with the sauce, topped with green onions and cilantro. Grilled baby bok choy and steamed rice make a great side dish.

Grilled Swordfish with Tomato Orange Salad

All you need:

  • 3 navel oranges
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 tbsp minced shallot
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 4 (6 oz, 1-inch-thick each) swordfish steaks
  • 1 pound mixed cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1/3 cup torn basil leaves
  • 1/3 cup chopped pitted kalamata olives
  • 1 (5 oz) container baby arugula
  • squeeze of fresh lemon
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • olive oil for brushing

All you do:

  1. For the swordfish, remove the zest from 1 orange with a microplane (yielding about 2 teaspoons) and reserve. Cut away the peel and white pith from oranges; cut out the segments and reserve. Squeeze any remaining juice from the orange membranes into a small bowl and add orange zest, 2 tablespoons oil, shallot, salt and pepper. Pour into a large food-storage bag; add swordfish steaks, seal bag and turn to coat. Marinate at room temperature while preparing grill.
  2. For the salad, gently stir together the orange segments, tomatoes, basil, olives, remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, salt and pepper. In a large bowl, toss baby arugula with fresh lemon, olive oil, salt and pepper; set aside.
  3. Heat an outdoor gas grill, or prepare coals for a charcoal grill for direct grilling over medium-high heat. Remove swordfish steaks from marinade; discard marinade. Brush the cooking grates clean and oil the grill rack. Brush swordfish steaks with oil. Grill swordfish over direct heat 10 minutes, turning once, or until just opaque but still moist in the center. Place arugula mixture on a large platter, top with the steaks and then top with the tomato orange mixture; serve immediately.

Environmental Advocacy: We Can’t Just Kick the Can Down the Road on Bering Sea Canyons. We Must Protect Them Now.

As a leading provider of commercial seafood in the United States, Hy-Vee is taking a progressive approach on several key environmental advocacy initiatives that we expect will have a positive effect on the health of the oceans and the species that live and swim in them.

We have made a strong commitment to building a market for Responsible Choice seafood. This makes us an important stakeholder in discussions about how to best protect the health of ecosystems that harbor and nurture that seafood.

Here’s a recent example of how we’re using our sway:

Hy-Vee appealed to the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (NPFMC) to approve protections for the Zhemchung and Pribilof canyons, which are carved into the Bering Sea shelf break, a unique ecoregion known as the Green Belt due to its extraordinary productivity.

The canyons contain abundant and diverse corals and sponges that provide valuable habitat for commercially important fish and other marine species. In many parts of the canyons, the deep sea corals can be over 1,000 years old. If stripped from the ocean floor or crushed by fishing gear, the corals are unlikely to will recover, creating a habitat deficit that is difficult if not impossible to regenerate.

Numerous fish and crab species depend upon canyon terrain for spawning and nursery areas, making these habitats important for sustaining species’ populations. Commercially important species that utilize the canyons for essential fish habitat include rockfish, Pacific cod, halibut, pollock and several species of crab.

Based on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) assessment that said the geography, if not the habitat, of the canyons is unique and continuous study was warranted, the council decided on further study – the equivalent of kicking the can down the road.

Hy-Vee and a coalition of environmental groups and other stakeholders have taken the position that additional study isn’t the right tack. Protecting the canyons now is the equivalent of providing stakeholders with an insurance policy that can help preserve biodiversity as well as ensure the sustainability of fisheries and seafood supply.

Our leadership in advocacy on this issue may surprise some people. It’s as simple as this: we want to be able to offer our customers the species most impacted by non-sustainable management practices well into the future. If the experts we rely on urge more protection, we’re going to side with these approaches.

We can’t just protect one species at a time. We’ve made a commitment to other sea life and habitat, and one of the ways to accomplish this is to make sure all the species thrive.

Additional Resources

What’s the Catch? Key Issues Affecting Seafood Sustainability

Four primary issues affect the sustainability of seafood, and Hy-Vee is paying close attention as part of the company’s efforts to responsibly source its fresh and private label frozen seafood products by the end of 2015.

One is no more important than another. If one of the issues gets out of balance, it can affect another.

1. Impacts on target stock – is the species being overfished? One example of a species that is being overfished is Bluefin tuna, which is called “toro” in fancy sushi restaurants. Hy-Vee doesn’t carry Bluefin tuna because of the many environmental issues associated with this fishery.

These days, the United States does a good job managing its fisheries and products from domestic fisheries usually meet Hy-Vee’s definition of responsible sourcing. But there have been problems in the past – with Atlantic cod, for example – and when fisheries are depleted, recovery takes a very long time because the fish are long-lived and don’t reproduce quickly. That means a long period where certain species are unavailable from the time the overfishing stops and the population rebounds.

One issue we’re seeing now is that as domestic stocks are recovering, international fisheries are being depleted.

2. Impacts on other species (bycatch) – how much bycatch is occurring and what non-target species are being caught accidentally? Some gear types like huge longlines indiscriminately catch endangered species like sea birds, sharks, and sea turtles, while some gear types are more selective and only catch one fish at a time.

In the conservation world, the incidental catch of large marine mammals like dolphins helped inspire people and catalyze a movement toward more awareness of the serious issues with fishing. That problem is less severe now, but bycatch is still a problem and we’re seeing issues with other species.

3. Habitat and ecosystem impacts – is the fishing gear affecting the surrounding habitat? Is the fishery removing all the top predators from the ecosystem and changing the dynamics of the marine community? Some gear types like trawl nets that drag along the seafloor can have a significant impact on ancient coral communities – some of them 1,000 years old or more – while some gear types like pole-and-line never come into contact with the bottom.

We have to be mindful that when we take away too many predators, the ecosystem can get out of balance and that can affect the habitat sea life needs to survive.

An example of this is found in kelp forests, where sea otters were hunted for their furs. With the predators gone, that allowed the sea urchins to invade and eat the kelp. The effects were felt throughout the ecosystem, as the kelp is important habitat not only for marine mammals like sea otters, sea lions, seals and grey whales, but also for many types of rockfish.

4. Management – are the rules regulating the fishery working? Most fisheries in the US are very well managed but some international fisheries have lax regulations, or no regulations at all. Illegal fishing can be a major problem in fisheries with poor management. Illegal fishing harms honest fishermen, weakens coastal communities, is associated with crime such as narcotraffic and human rights abuses, and undermines companies like Hy-Vee that are trying to do the right thing.

Assessing these four criteria gives FishWise an understanding of the wild fisheries supplying Hy-Vee’s seafood products, and whether those products qualify for one of Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice labels. When Hy-Vee’s customers see the Responsible Choice label, they can be confident that the seafood they’re buying is not contributing to unhealthy oceans.

Recipe Spotlight: Surf and Turf with Responsible Choice Seafood and Angus Reserve Beef

A meal that pairs Responsible Choice seafood and Hy-Vee’s Angus Reserve Beef offers both satisfying taste and the confidence of knowing that the seafood is responsibly harvested and the beef is 100 percent natural and comes from Midwest-raised, grain-fed cattle.

Surf and turf is a favorite American cuisine. Angus Reserve Beef is naturally aged, so it’s also naturally tender. I like the contrast of somewhat sweet scallops with the char of the grill.

A word of caution: Don’t overcook the scallops or they will become rubbery. A minute to a minute and a half on each side is sufficient. Before cooking, be sure to pat them dry to remove excess moisture; otherwise, they will steam rather than sear.

The Angus Reserve Beef offers is priced at three tiers to meet different budgets: Prime Reserve, Choice Reserve and Angus Reserve.

Following are some surf and turf recipes to consider:

Crabmeat-Stuffed Lobster Tail

All you need:

  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1/2 tbsp lemon zest
  • 4 (8 oz. each) lobster tails, thawed
  • sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 4 tbsp salted butter
  • 5 tbsp minced onion
  • 1/2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 cup crushed round butter crackers
  • 1 1/2 cups jumbo lump crabmeat, picked over for shells and cartilage
  • 1/2 tsp lemon zest
  • 5 tbsp dry sherry
  • 2 tsp olive oil

All you do:

  1. To make lemon butter: combine 1/2 cup melted butter, lemon juice and lemon zest. Set aside.
  2. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Split lobster tails in half. Remove tail meat, then replace in shells. Place lobster on baking sheet. Season with salt and pepper to taste, then brush with melted lemon butter. Bake for 5 to 6 minutes.
  3. Melt 4 tablespoons butter in a small saucepan or sauté pan. Add onion and garlic and cook until onion is translucent. Do not brown. Fold in crushed crackers, crabmeat, salt, white pepper, lemon zest, sherry and olive oil.
  4. Remove lobster tails from the oven after 5 to 6 minutes. Brush again with melted lemon butter, then pack stuffing tightly on top. Bake for 12-1/2 to 13 minutes, until lobster meat reaches 145 degrees on an instant-read thermometer. Brush one final time with melted lemon butter before serving.

Grilled Filet with Herb Butter

All you need:

  • 1 tbsp whipped or regular butter, slightly softened
  • 3 tsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh chives
  • 3 tsp minced fresh oregano, divided
  • 1 tsp freshly grated lemon zest, divided
  • 1 tsp lemon juice
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh rosemary
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 pound filet mignon, about 1 1/2 inches thick, trimmed and cut into 4 portions

All you do:

  1. Preheat grill to high.
  2. Mash butter in a small bowl with the back of a spoon until soft and creamy. Stir in 2 teaspoons oil until combined. Add chives, 1 teaspoon oregano, 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest, lemon juice, and salt and pepper to taste. Cover and place in the freezer.
  3. Combine the remaining 1 teaspoon oil, 2 teaspoons oregano, 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest, rosemary, minced garlic, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Rub on both sides of steak. Grill the steak 3 to 5 minutes per side for medium-rare. Spread the herb butter on top of the steaks and let rest for 5 minutes before serving.

Grilled Sea Scallops with Lemon

All you need:

  • 3 scallops per person
  • extra virgin olive oil, as needed
  • zest of 1/2 lemon
  • herbed sea salt, as needed
  • cracked black pepper, as needed

All you do:

  1. Prepare grill for medium-high heat cooking and make sure the grates are clean.
  2. Toss scallops with olive oil, lemon zest, salt and pepper, just enough to coat. Place on grill for 1 to 1 1/2 minutes per side or just until cooked through.

Recipe Spotlight: Ahi Tuna with Mango Salsa Sizzles with Summer

Finally, it’s grilling season. Ahi tuna, also called yellowfin, is a great fish for the grill because it’s firm, moist and takes very little time to cook – meaning you can get back to enjoying summer.

When choosing Ahi tuna, one of our great Responsible Choice species, look for firm flesh and a bright red color with little to no blood line.

I like this recipe because it is a versatile dish that can be used as an appetizer or it can be paired with a couple of summery side dishes to make a complete meal. It is a great choice whether your goal is to impress your guests with a bright flavor sensation or take care of a weeknight meal in short order.

The mango salsa can be prepared ahead of time and the tuna takes only 4 minutes on the grill, so you won’t be spending a lot of time cooking while your guests wait, which can be a hassle.

This is a great light dish that will leave your guests feeling full and satisfied, without adding a lot of calories.


Grilled Ahi Tuna with Mango Salsa

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 1 ripe mango, peeled, pitted and diced
  • 1/2 small red onion, diced
  • 1/2 red pepper, diced
  • 1 jalapeno, deseeded and minced
  • 2 tbsp minced fresh cilantro
  • 1 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 4 (5 oz each) ahi tuna fillets
  • 1 tsp lemon pepper
  • salad or grilled asparagus, for serving

All you do:

  1. In a medium-size bowl, combine the mango, red onion, red pepper, jalapeno, cilantro, lime juice and salt and pepper to taste. Mix until all ingredients are incorporated. Refrigerate for 1 hour to bring out the flavors.
  2. Preheat the grill. Season tuna with lemon pepper and grill on high heat for 90 seconds to 2 minutes per side for a rare to medium-rare steak. Set aside.
  3. Top each steak with a generous portion of mango salsa. Serve with a side of fresh salad or grilled asparagus for a complete meal.

The Ross Sea Pledge isn’t Just Words on Paper for Hy-Vee

As part of our efforts to responsibly source Hy-Vee seafood and fish, we’re involved in some behind-the-scenes environmental efforts intended to prevent some problems before they occur.

One of those efforts is the Ross Sea Pledge. The Ross Sea teems with species of large predatory fish and small krill, tiny crustaceans that are a giant link in the aquatic food chain and help sustain the whales, seals, penguins and other aquatic mammals that live in this pristine, unaltered ecosystem. It’s a magnificent “living laboratory” for scientists to study marine life and is known as “the last ocean” because of its relatively untouched state.

Unfortunately, the Ross Sea is vulnerable. By signing the Ross Sea Pledge, Hy-Vee has given its word that it won’t be part of that developing problem and is, in fact, part of the solution. By signing the pledge, Hy-Vee supports creation of a Marine Protected Area to protect the area against commercial fishing and pollution. This initiative is broadly supported by governments, scientists, NGOs and the fishing industry.

Hy-Vee is proud to be part of that group. What it means to customers is that we will not procure Antarctic toothfish (known as Chilean sea bass) from the Ross Sea. By taking a hands-off approach to that species from the Southern Ocean, we join others in working to reduce the level of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing in the Southern Ocean. Chilean sea bass is a notorious species for IUU fishing.

We’re not the only retailer supporting the initiative, but we are one of the few who are taking these aggressive steps to ensure that we’re procuring seafood for our customers in a way that not only protects the supply of seafood for generations to come but also the health of the oceans.

By the end of 2015, all fresh and Hy-Vee brand seafood will be responsibly sourced.

We’ve staked our corporate word on that, something we don’t do lightly. It’s not just lip service; we’re taking the actions to back it up.

More detailed information about the Ross Sea can be found here.

Recipe Spotlight: Love Oysters Rockefeller? Chef Andrew Has You Covered

Authored by Chef Andrew Kintigh and John Rohrs

John here:
Hy-Vee customers who love oysters can feel confident when they come from the fisheries of U.S. Gulf of Mexico states. This is an extremely well-managed area, and because they’re often eaten raw, the beds are constantly monitored to make sure they’re safe to harvest and consume.

Hurricanes and other disasters can cause a loss of habitat, but right now, there’s a consistent supply due to seasonal limits and fishing gear restrictions. The fisheries use tongs or small dredges to eliminate bycatch and to reduce effects on the ocean floor that could harm other species.

All of Hy-Vee’s Gulf oysters are Responsible Choice, part of our commitment to environmental stewardship to ensure healthy oceans and an abundant supply of seafood for generations to come.

Andrew here:
Below are a couple of my favorite recipes for Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice oysters from the Gulf of Mexico:

Oysters Rockefeller

All you need:

Mignonette Sauce

  • 3/4 cup champagne vinegar
  • 2 shallots, minced
  • 2 tbsp cracked black peppercorns
  • 1 tbsp chopped chervil
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced

Oysters

  • 4 tbsp unsalted butter
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/3 cup bread crumbs, panko preferred
  • 2 shallots, chopped
  • 2 cups chopped fresh spinach
  • 1/4 cup Pernod
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • dash red pepper sauce
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 tbsp chopped parsley
  • 2 dozen oysters, on the half shell
  • rock salt
  • lemon wedges, for garnish

All you do:

  1. Sauce: In a small bowl whisk together all ingredients. Cover and chill 1 hour before serving with oysters.
  2. Melt butter in a skillet. Sauté the garlic for 2 minutes to infuse the butter.
  3. Place the bread crumbs in a mixing bowl and add half the garlic butter; set aside. To the remaining garlic butter in the skillet, add shallots and spinach. Cook for 3 minutes until the spinach wilts. Deglaze the pan with Pernod; season with salt and pepper. Add a dash of red pepper sauce. Allow the mixture to cook down for a few minutes.
  4. Finish off the bread crumbs by mixing in olive oil, Parmesan and parsley. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  6. Spoon 1 heaping teaspoon of the spinach mixture on each oyster followed by a spoonful of the bread crumb mixture. Sprinkle a baking pan amply with rock salt. Arrange the oysters in the salt to steady them. Bake in a preheated 450-degree oven for 10 to 15 minutes until golden. Serve with lemon wedges and Mignonette Sauce.

 

Charbroiled Oysters on the Half Shell

All you need:

  • 8 oz softened butter
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped garlic
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • pinch dried oregano
  • 1 1/2 dozen large, freshly shucked oysters on the half shell
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan and Romano cheeses, mixed
  • 1 tbsp chopped flat-leaf parsley

All you do:

  1. Heat a gas or charcoal grill. In a medium bowl, mix butter with garlic, pepper, salt and oregano.
  2. Place oysters on the half shell right over the hottest part of grill. Spoon enough of the seasoned butter over the oysters so that some of it will overflow into the fire and flame up a bit.
  3. The oysters are ready when they puff up and get curly on the sides, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle the grated Parmesan and Romano cheeses and parsley on top. Serve the oysters on the shells immediately with baguette bread.