Ocean Vacations: Reduce Your Impact

Hy-Vee customers from the Midwest often love to spend vacations by the ocean, relaxing and taking in the sights, smells and sounds. Even while on vacation, there are small steps travelers can take to reduce their impact on the ocean.

Reducing Impacts on Oceans

  1. Trash and Recycling: After spending a day outdoors, make sure to pack all trash before leaving the beach and dispose of it properly. Recycle any materials that you can, such as paper or beverage containers.
  2. Respect the Environment. Don’t touch or feed the ocean animals. Travelers may come across animals on the land and in the sea, but it’s best to leave them alone and simply observe, not interfere. Also, do not damage or remove any plants.
  3. Choose environmentally friendly transport. Perhaps you’ll stay oceanside, but if not, consider walking, biking or at least taking public transportation to get there. Be sure to stay on trails and public footpaths to respect the local environment.
  4. The Seafood Watch App: Download the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s free Seafood Watch app to your phone. Dining out while on vacation is always a highlight. Using the app, you’ll have instant access to find sustainable seafood options at restaurants and stores and more.

For more information, visit the Ocean Conservancy and Surfrider Foundation.

Author: Kathleen Mullen-Ley

My name is Kathleen Mullen-Ley, and I am a project manager for FishWise. FishWise, a nonprofit sustainable seafood consultancy, has been working with Hy-Vee to research and recommend seafood product sourcing, develop and implement Hy-Vee's Responsible Choice Seafood materials and staff training, and analyze data to measure progress towards Hy-Vee's 2015 Commitment. I hold a master’s degree in marine biodiversity and conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a Bachelor of Arts in environmental studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. My graduate research project was an analysis of the World Trade Organization ruling on the U.S. dolphin-safe tuna label and its implications for future market-based marine conservation efforts. My experience analyzing fishery management issues and communicating marine science to diverse audiences combined with my respect for ocean life has made me well-prepared to take on the challenges of sustainable seafood.