Eat Your Fish!

Cod is the perfect way to get your foot in the boat with seafood. It lacks that particular “fishy” taste that many people find unappealing about seafood. So if you or someone you’re cooking for isn’t a big “fish” person and doesn’t like the smell or taste, this may be the fish to try!

Cod is an excellent mild fish that provides many benefits for your body, including being linked to the reduction of heart disease. (1, 2)

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish and are associated with a lower risk of stroke and keeping cholesterol under control, particularly by reducing LDL cholesterol, or the “bad” cholesterol. (1, 2)

Cod is also rich in vitamins B6 and B12, which keep the homocysteine levels low in our bodies. This is linked to reducing the risk of heart-related problems. (3)

If you suffer from sunburns during the sunny months, cod may help provide protection against those burns with its anti-inflammatory properties. It’s a natural sunscreen! (4)

Stop by your local Hy-Vee today and view our assortment of cod. A dietitian is around the corner if you have any questions about your cod or seafood purchase.

But there are still more fish in the sea to try! Once you get your feet wet with cod, you will be dying to move on to other varieties fish.

  1. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. 7 things to know about omega-3 fatty acids. US Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/omega. Updated September 24, 2015.
  2. American Heart Association. Fish and omega-3 fatty acids. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/HealthyDietGoals/Fish-and-Omega-3-Fatty-Acids_UCM_303248_Article.jsp#.V73B3ybQCUl. Updated June 15, 2015.
  3. National Institutes of Health. Vitamin B6 dietary supplement fact sheet. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB6-HealthProfessional/. Updated February 11, 2016.
  4. Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Belury MA, Porter K, Beversdorf DQ, Lemeshow S, Glaser R. Depressive symptoms, omega-6:omega-3 fatty acids, and inflammation in older adults. Psychosom Med. 2007 April; 69(3): 217-24.

Author: Megan Callahan

Megan Callahan, MS, RD, LD is a Hy-Vee dietitian in Lee's Summit, Missouri. She is dedicated to helping people live healthier and happier lives. Megan received a bachelor’s degree in dietetics from Missouri State University. She completed her dietetic internship at the University of Kansas Medical Center, where she also received her Master of Science degree in dietetics and nutrition. She is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (formerly the American Dietetic Association). She is also the president-elect of the Kansas City Dietetic Association. With a passion for nutrition and wellness, Megan is dedicated to educating customers and promoting healthy lifestyles.