100 Percent Of Hy-Vee’s Private-Brand Shelf-Stable Tuna Products Are Now Responsibly Sourced

Hy-Vee announced in December that it has achieved its goal of transitioning 100 percent of its private label shelf-stable tuna products to environmentally responsible sources. The news comes less than one year after Hy-Vee announced it was expanding its Seafood Procurement Policy to include the shelf-stable tuna category.

In addition to making big improvements to its tuna sourcing, Hy-Vee also recognizes the importance of supporting initiatives to drive positive change in the global tuna sector. In November, Hy-Vee signed on to a letter to the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) calling for the treaty-based international organization to adopt measures to address key issues that are fundamental to sustainable tuna management.

Hy-Vee’s Seafood Procurement Policy was developed in partnership with FishWise, a nonprofit sustainable seafood consultancy that promotes the health and recovery of ecosystems through environmentally and socially responsible business practices.

FishWise commends Hy-Vee’s willingness to begin addressing the environmental and social impacts of its shelf-stable tuna supply chains. Hy-Vee is leading by example, proving to other retailers and tuna brands that it is possible to start taking meaningful action now.

Read more about Hy-Vee’s Responsible Seafood Program.

Author: Kathleen Mullen-Ley

My name is Kathleen Mullen-Ley, and I am a project manager for FishWise. FishWise, a nonprofit sustainable seafood consultancy, has been working with Hy-Vee to research and recommend seafood product sourcing, develop and implement Hy-Vee's Responsible Choice Seafood materials and staff training, and analyze data to measure progress towards Hy-Vee's 2015 Commitment. I hold a master’s degree in marine biodiversity and conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a Bachelor of Arts in environmental studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. My graduate research project was an analysis of the World Trade Organization ruling on the U.S. dolphin-safe tuna label and its implications for future market-based marine conservation efforts. My experience analyzing fishery management issues and communicating marine science to diverse audiences combined with my respect for ocean life has made me well-prepared to take on the challenges of sustainable seafood.