Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood Initiative Ranked No. 2 in the U.S.

Greenpeace recently released its 2018 Carting Away the Oceans (CATO) report, ranking Hy-Vee No. 2 out of the 22 largest supermarket chains in the U.S. for its sustainability efforts. Since 2008, Greenpeace has evaluated and ranked supermarkets in the CATO report based on their efforts to protect both the oceans and seafood industry workers.

Hy-Vee was listed as one of the top two retailers in the report, finishing in the “best” category and taking the lead in the “initiatives and transparency” categories. Hy-Vee was evaluated on the sustainability of its seafood in four key areas: policy, initiatives, labeling and transparency, and inventory. Greenpeace noted Hy-Vee’s “rapid ascent in rankings,” as this is only the third time Hy-Vee has been included in the CATO report.

Hy-Vee was praised by Greenpeace for its efforts to address illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing through political advocacy, and participation in industry and NGO-led conversations to identify solutions. Greenpeace also congratulated Hy-Vee on its Responsible Choice canned skipjack and albacore tuna products, which are produced exclusively with tuna caught using environmentally friendly methods.

“Hy-Vee has continued to make significant improvements in recent years on sustainable seafood,” said David Pinsky, senior oceans campaigner at Greenpeace USA. “From ensuring its own brand canned tuna products are more sustainably sourced to avoiding unsustainable seafood like Chilean sea bass and advocating for industry improvements, Hy-Vee sets a high bar for other retailers to follow.”

Hy-Vee’s decision to discontinue selling Chilean sea bass – due to concerns about overfishing and bycatch of threatened or endangered species – also helped improve its ranking, as it’s one of only three top retailers to do so. Hy-Vee’s stance against genetically modified fish was also highlighted as a notable achievement.

Since the report’s inception, many large retailers including Hy-Vee have developed stringent seafood policies. Many of Hy-Vee’s policies are developed in partnership with FishWise, a nonprofit sustainable seafood consultancy that promotes the health and recovery of ecosystems through environmentally and socially responsible business practices.

“Hy-Vee has always set a high bar for sustainable seafood,” said Kathleen Mullen-Ley, project director at FishWise. “Not only does Hy-Vee prioritize sourcing environmentally responsible seafood, but they are proactively tackling some of the toughest challenges in seafood supply chains.”

Greenpeace’s full Carting Away the Oceans report can be found at https://www.greenpeace.org/usa/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Carting-Away-the-Oceans-10.pdf.

Aquaculture in Central Iowa

Barramundi FarmVeroBlue Farms is working to become North America’s largest land-based, indoor aquaculture company. Through its Iowa’s First Hub located in Webster City, Iowa, VeroBlue Farms is expanding its production of the barramundi fish species through a new urban farm with approximately 7.2 million pounds of production per year. VeroBlue Farms is North America’s largest land-based, indoor aquaculture company raising 5 million pounds of Barramundi a year.

Barramundi is a freshwater fish species found in tropical and semi-tropical regions ranging from the Persian Gulf to China. It can be found as far south as Australia, and as far north as India. Barramundi scored extremely high on the NuVal scoring system (mid-80s or higher), and was rated as a Green “Best Choice” for sustainability by the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program.

Barramundi is known for its firm, white and succulent flesh. It has a moist, fine-grained texture and mild flavor. This nutritious fish is low in fat and high in protein. One barramundi fillet provides the same omega-3 content as approximately 17 steaks, making this fish one of the best sources to improve heart health.Barramundi Fish

Iowa’s First Hub is a family-run operation working to provide a fresh, sustainable product from America’s heartland. Using a recirculating system from VeroBlue Farms, referred to as opposing flows technology, the system utilizes air to circulate the water in the culture tank. The system is designed to create two opposing flows of water that create compressed air being introduced on each side of the tank. Check out this YouTube video for a virtual walk-through of the farm. And because they’re raised in a self-contained environment, our barramundi have no impact on the world’s oceans. They possess all the benefits without the negatives of fish from the oceans, such as mercury, PCBs, dioxins and other contaminants.

At Hy-Vee, we are proud to support one of Iowa’s aquaculture leaders providing farm-to-table seafood. It is exciting that the operation is located in one of our very own Hy-Vee communities, right in the heart of our home state. The fish are grown in an environmentally friendly and sustainable setting which allows us to consistently offer our customers a high-quality and fresh product year-round.

A True Alaskan Delicacy

In Alaska, Tanner crab – or Bairdi snow crab, as the industry calls it – is a one-of-kind shellfish that’s simple yet distinctive, with delicately sweet, snow-white flesh that explains its tremendous value and widespread popularity.  The trademark big bright orange clusters guarantee a memorable presentation. It is much larger and packs a much sweeter, richer flavor than its cousin, the Opilio snow crab. Many Alaska fisherman believe Bairdi crab is the best-tasting of all the Alaskan crab species.

The Bairdi crab has always been harvested from the same areas in the Bering Sea off Alaska. It is targeted along with Opilio snow crab using traps and pots. The crab is then identified and separated as Opilio and Bairdi. One quick way to determine difference is its eye color. Bairdi crab has red eyes and Opilio has green eyes.

For years Bairdi was not marketed in the U.S. because of low quotas and competition with the Opilio snow crab. Thanks to careful management practices, increased awareness and new quotas, customers can now find Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Bairdi snow crab plentiful and featured in their local Hy-Vee stores.

Get On The Grill With Seafood For National Grilling Month

Most people think of hot dogs, burgers and grilled veggies when they envision a backyard barbecue. But did you know that seafood can be just as good (or better!) than other grilling staples? While some people may be intimidated by the idea of grilling seafood – thinking of it as too delicate or getting easily stuck on the grate – the truth is that seafood is a great option for your next barbecue. As you celebrate National Grilling Month this July and all summer long, consider adding seafood to your grill for a quick, healthy and tasty option.

The first thing to consider when grilling seafood is what type of seafood to use. Since seafood generally cooks quickly, it’s best to grill with thick (>1 inch) fillets, shell-on shrimp, or even small whole fish, like mackerel, if you plan on putting the fish directly on the grate. However, this does not mean that smaller fillets cannot be grilled. Wrapping in foil, corn husks, or banana leaves, as well as placing fish on cedar planks are all great ways to help prevent overcooking and keep smaller fillets tender.

Once you know what seafood you’re going to use, you can set yourself up for success on the grill by using the indirect heat method to ensure your food is cooked on both sides but still tender. Indirect heat means that you create one high-heat area and one low-heat area on your grill; you can do this by placing coals on one side of the kettle or preheating both sides of a gas grill, then turning one side off.

To cook with indirect heat, sear the fish on the high-heat area for about 2 minutes (with skin down if you are using skin-on fillets), then flip and transfer to the low-heat area to finish cooking. The rule of thumb for cooking fish fillets is 10 minutes per inch of thickness or until it flakes apart under gentle pressure, so if you have a one-inch fillet you should sear for 2 minutes and then cook over low heat for about 8 minutes. Chef Barton Seaver gives a full explanation of the indirect cooking method here.

Now that you’re fully equipped to master seafood grilling, the only thing left to do is decide what dish to make first! These Grilled Skin-on Fillets with Marinated Citrus Salad from Barton Seaver use the indirect grilling method and are a great way to get the whole family outside and enjoy seafood throughout the summer!

 

Grilled Skin-on Fish Fillets With Marinated Citrus Salad

 This recipe works well with all types of fish fillets including Alaskan pollock, barramundi, salmon and trout.

 

All you need:
2 oranges, peeled and segmented
1 lemon, peeled and segmented
1 serrano chile, very thinly sliced
1 shallot, very thinly sliced
salt
4 skin-on fish fillets
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 tsp good red wine vinegar

 

All you do: 

  1. Combine orange and lemon segments, chile, shallot, and salt to taste in a colander. Let mixture sit while you cook the fish.
  2. Prepare a charcoal grill, concentrating the hot coals onto one side of the kettle. Season fillets with salt. Place the fish, skin-side down, over the hottest part of the fire, leaving them there until the edges begin to crisp, about 2 minutes. To finish cooking, rotate the grill grate so the fish sits opposite the hot coals. Cover the grill and continue to cook for another 8-10 minutes, until fish is cooked through.
  3. Transfer the draining citrus mixture into a bowl and gently stir in vinegar and olive oil. Use a fish spatula to remove the fish from the grill and place them on a warm plate. Serve the fillets immediately with the marinated citrus salad.

 

Grilled salmon steaks on the flaming.

 

Arctic Circle Salmon

The Copper River and Bristol Bay are world-class Alaska salmon fisheries. This week, your local Hy-Vee is featuring keta salmon from a fishery north of the Arctic Circle.

The species has experienced a surge in population in recent years with stable water conditions and water levels. This has produced larger harvest quotas and lower retail prices for customers, making keta salmon grow in popularity.

Fed by the pristine waters of the Noatak, Selawik and Kobuk Rivers, the nutrient-rich Kotzebue Sound provides an ideal habitat for ocean-caught keta. The Arctic keta fishery located here is integral to the community of Kotzebue, largely comprised of the Inupiat people, who have inhabited the region of Kotzebue since at least the 15th century. Kotzebue residents depend on subsistence fishing for their personal use and commercial fishing for income. Fishing has traditionally been the lifeblood of the community, and salmon are revered as a most precious resource.

 

Hy-Vee has partnered with Copper River Seafoods to help support the community and livelihood of the native residents by promoting this sustainable resource of wild keta salmon.

Arctic keta salmon are distinguished by their exceptionally high-quality taste, bright color, firm texture and high omega-3 fat content.  It’s the ideal salmon for those who prefer a milder flavor salmon and will complement any marinade or sauce. This salmon is great for grilling or cooking over a fire. It’s also great for smoking and serving cold in salads, sandwiches, dips and spreads.

Stop at your local Hy-Vee and try some of the finest keta salmon Alaska can provide. Every purchase will help support the fishermen of Kotzebue and their community.

Photo credit: Alsaka Seafood Marketing Institute & Copper River Seafood

Seafood Summer

The American Heart Association recommends that we eat seafood at least twice a week. Seafood is a protein option that is packed with nutrients that may impact your health in a positive way – and it tastes great, too! Eating seafood may help manage your blood sugars, lower your cholesterol and your blood pressure. So, what’s in seafood that gives it all this power? Omega-3 which is the healthy fat that we want to be consuming in our diet. Having a diet rich in omega-3 helps manage weight and lower triglycerides. Fatty fish such as salmon will help lower cholesterol by increasing HDL levels in the blood. Seafood also contains many essential vitamins including A, E, D and C.

If you or a family member haven’t found a favorite fish, try it in something like fish tacos! Everyone loves tacos and it is an easy way to incorporate seafood in your weekly diet. Look below for a healthy fish taco recipe featuring our Hy-Vee seafood of the month: Rainforest Tilapia. Look for other Responsible Choice seafood at your local Hy-Vee.

 

Fish Tacos

All you need:

For the fish:
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp garlic powder
4 Hy-Vee Rainforest Tilapia filets
1 tbsp oil
1 package La Tortilla Factory Low Carb Small Tortillas
Red cabbage, shredded, if desired
Avocado, diced, if desired

For the Chipotle Lime Cream Sauce:
½ cup plain Greek yogurt
¼ cup Bolthouse Farms Sweet Heat Sriracha Yogurt Dressing
1 tbsp lime juice

Suggested toppings:
Chopped fresh cilantro
Sliced radish
Shredded romaine lettuce

All you do:

  1. In a small bowl, mix together the cumin, onion powder and garlic powder. Sprinkle both sides of each fish fillet evenly with the seasoning.
  2. Prepare Chipotle Lime Cream Sauce: Mix all ingredients together until smooth and chill until ready to eat.
  3. Heat oil in pan over medium-high heat until hot. Lay fish fillets in a pan and cook on each side for about 2 minutes, or until fish begins to flake. Remove pan from heat and flake the fish with a fork. Serve fish on warm small tortillas, topping with red cabbage, avocado and Chipotle Lime Cream Sauce. Enjoy!

Mt. Cook Salmon

With sustainable practices and traceable fishing methods, Mt. Cook’s approach to environmental care makes it an industry leader. And then, of course, there’s the quality of the fish. The company’s experts prefer to feed the salmon by hand. This allows them to observe the health and well-being of each fish, and ensures the fish are fed at the correct nutritional levels. As a result, the salmon are fit and health0y, have the perfect amount of fat and a delicate texture and clean taste.

Dish On Fish: The Best Grilled Fish Recipes

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

From Dish on Fish: The Best Grilled Fish Recipes

We can all agree that there’s no better way to ring in summer than by firing up the grill to enjoy some seared seafood!

Before we begin listing out the best seafood grilling recipes we could find, let’s first give a shout-out to Jessica Gavin’s Grilled Cedar Plank Salmon Fillets. Once you get a taste of the smoky flavor from these, you’ll understand why we’re constantly calling the cedar plank our go-to summer grilling essential.

Another standout? Well Plated by Erin’s delightfully sweet and savory Coconut Pineapple Shrimp Skewers have us salivating. The flavors on these kebabs will take you straight to the beach and we’re betting the sauce would work well on just about any type of fish.

As always, let us know which picks make your short list. Happy grilling!

Grilled Fish Tacos with Kiwi Jalapeno Salsa
Switch up your Taco Tuesday menu with these grilled whitefish tacos!
Get the recipe
Source: Sweet Peas and Saffron

Herb & Garlic Grilled Tuna Steaks

Take your cookout game to the next level with these restaurant-inspired tuna steaks!
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Source: Beachbody On Demand

Grilled Cedar Plank Salmon Fillet

The cedar plank in this recipe gives the salmon a mouthwatering smoky flavor that you don’t want to miss.
Get the Recipe

Source: Jessica Gavin

Grilled Mahi-Mahi & Veggies Foil Packs

Healthy, fast, flavorful. This mahi-mahi recipe is the new grilling MVP.
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Source: The Beach House Kitchen

Coconut Pineapple Shrimp Skewers

These scrumptious shrimp skewers bring the tropical islands straight to your backyard!
Get the Recipe

Source: Well Plated by Erin.

Grilled Tilapia with Mango Salsa

Oh, the flavors of summer! There’s nothing better than grilled fish topped with a fruity salsa.
Get the Recipe

Plan The Perfect Picnic With Seafood

From the trees to the breeze, picnics are a fun way your family can soak up the sunshine while enjoying a delicious and nutritious meal together.

“Picnics should be a prescription for health,” said Annessa Chumbley, registered dietitian, nutritionist and TV host. “They accomplish three amazing things needed for healthy living: nourishing the body, focusing on relationships and soaking up the benefits of being surrounded by nature.”

Consider stepping up your picnic game with a refreshing option like seafood. Eating seafood two times per week, as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, can provide unique health benefits as a lean protein and source of omega-3s, healthy fats that are beneficial for your heart and your brain. To make it easier to create picture-perfect picnics, try these tips from Chumbley.

  • Pack bottles of cold or even frozen water in the picnic basket to help keep everything chilled and fresh so it’s ready to devour.
  • Plan to eat fresh and healthy foods like this Crab Salad for an easy-to- make option.
  • Create a dip nearly everyone can enjoy. Seafood can be added to almost any dip, and can be enjoyed with fresh, crunchy vegetables.
  • Jars can be a lifesaver when packing a picnic. Tape utensils to the sides of the jars for easy access to your favorite foods.
  • Don’t bring your phones, tablets or any other device that can distract you from family time. This is a time to relax and socialize with one another.
  • Try taping a thermometer inside your bag or cooler so you know the food is at safe, cool temperatures.
  • Place a small cutting board and knife in your pack, which can come in handy for chopping up fruits and vegetables.

For more seafood recipes and meal inspiration, visit seafoodnutrition.org or follow #Seafood2xWk on social media.


Crab Salad

Recipe courtesy of the Seafood Nutrition Partnership Eating Heart Healthy Program
Serves 4

All you need:

  • 1/2 cup plain nonfat yogurt
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 tbsp green onions
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • Salt, to taste
  • Pepper, to taste
  • 1 oz walnuts (about 14 halves)
  • Cayenne pepper, to taste
  • 1 bag (8 oz) spinach
  • 1 can (6 oz) crab meat or fresh lump crab
  • 1/2 cup lentils, cooked
  • 1 grapefruit, cut into sections

All you do:

  1. Heat oven to 300 degrees.
  2. To make dressing, mix yogurt, lemon juice, green onions and olive oil. Add salt and pepper, to taste.
  3. Toss walnuts with cayenne pepper, to taste, and bake 4 to 5 minutes. Make sure walnuts do not burn. Remove walnuts from oven and let cool.
  4. Toss spinach with dressing. Toss with crab meat. Sprinkle lentils on top and add walnuts. Place grapefruit pieces around edge.