Moroccan Spiced Stew with Cod & Chickpeas

Serves 4-6

All you need:

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 large leeks, white and light green parts only, small dice
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 ½ tsp ground turmeric
  • ¼ tsp ground cayenne pepper
  • ½ tsp brown sugar
  • 2 (14.5 oz.) cans fire roasted diced tomatoes
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 ¼ pounds wild Alaska sustainable cod filet, cubed
  • 1 (14.5 oz.) can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 2 cups rough chopped kale greens
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  • ½ cup sliced almonds, toasted

All you do:

  1. Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat. Add the leeks and cook until softened.
  2. Add garlic, cinnamon, cumin, coriander, turmeric and cayenne pepper; sauté for 1 minute.
  3. Add brown sugar and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. Add tomatoes and vegetable broth and bring the soup to a simmer.
  5. Add cod pieces and chickpeas and simmer until all are tender, 4-5 minutes.
  6. Add the kale greens to the pot and cook for 1 minute or until just wilted.
  7. Season with salt and pepper and top with toasted almonds.

Nutrition per serving: 440 calories, 16g fat, 2g saturated fat, 65mg cholesterol, 1280mg sodium, 43g carbohydrate, 11g fiber, 11g sugar, 34g protein

Daily Values: 45% Vitamin A, 35% Vitamin C, 20% Calcium, 20% Iron

National Seafood Month: Let’s Get This #SeafoodParty Started

October commemorates National Seafood Month and the Seafood Nutrition Partnership will be celebrating all month long – hosting parties, Healthy Heart Summits, seafood restaurant weeks, events at schools, chef demos and cooking classes, retail specials and more – across the country and on social media. Join the fun with the hashtags #SeafoodParty and #Seafood2xWk!

Most people feel good about seafood – yet only one in 10 people meet the goal of having seafood two times per week.  Here are the top three reasons you should step up your seafood game:

  1. Live longer: Eating fish literally saves lives – eating seafood two to three times per week reduces the risk of death from any health-related cause1. Plus, seafood has essential omega-3s2.
  2. Seafood is a “protein with benefits”: It’s among the highest-quality proteins and offers many additional health benefits. It can reduce your risk of heart disease, improve how you feel during pregnancy, help your child develop a healthy brain and eyes, and improve memory and sharpness in older adults.
  3. Seafood is delicious, versatile, budget-friendly, and fast: From delicate, mild flounder to flavorful salmon, seafood can please any palate. Fresh, seasonal catches are easy on the wallet as are frozen and canned options. From start to finish, you can get fish or shellfish on the dinner table in 15 minutes or less.

So, what are you waiting for? Get started today with this Salmon Cake recipe and check out these additional deliciously easy and affordable recipes the whole family will like.

For more information and resources, visit www.seafoodnutrition.org.

Salmon Cakes with Yogurt & Cucumber Sauce

From SNP Eating Heart Healthy Nutrition Program

Serves: 4
Omega-3 Per Serving: 900 mg

All you need:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  • 1 tbsp onions, chopped fine
  • 1 tsp garlic, chopped
  • 1 potato, peeled, boiled and cooled
  • 1-14.7 oz salmon, canned, drained and crumbled
  • 1 lemon, juiced, divided
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1/2 tsp mustard
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  • 1/4 cup yogurt, plain
  • 1/2 tsp dill, dried
  • 1 cucumber, diced
  • salt & pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Heat 1/2 of oil in pan and add onions and garlic. Sauté until aroma is released.
  2. Meanwhile, crush potato and mix with salmon and 1/2 the lemon juice.
  3. Mix in cooked garlic and onions. Add egg and mustard. Mix again.
  4. Add bread crumbs. You may not need all the crumbs. Fold until combined.
  5. Heat pan again and add remaining oil.
  6. While heating, use an ice cream scoop or soup spoon and scoop salmon mixture. Place into pan, flattening the cake.
  7. Fry cakes on both sides for 4 minutes each.
  8. Combine yogurt, dill, cucumbers, remaining lemon juice and salt & pepper. Mix well.
  9. Serve salmon cakes with yogurt sauce.

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Sources

  1. FDA, Quantitative Assessment of the Net Effects on Fetal Neurodevelopment from Eating Commercial Fish (As Measured by IQ and also by Early Age Verbal Development in Children). Accessed 8/24/15: http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/Metals/ ucm393211.htm.
  2. Mozaffarian D, Rimm EB. Fish intake, contaminants, and human health: evaluating the risks and the benefits. JAMA. 2006;296:1885-99

Dish on Fish: Seafood Recipes For Your Family

Dish on Fish is an excellent seafood blog where you can explore new seafood recipes and learn relevant, relatable and easy-to-understand health and nutrition information about seafood. Hy-Vee is a partner of the National Fisheries Institute, which sponsors the blog and encourages Americans to eat seafood at least twice a week, as recommended by the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Seafood is a vital part of a healthy diet. Hy-Vee strives to provide customers with high-quality, Responsible Choice seafood and our Seafoodies blog provides detailed information and tips. We want to share Dish on Fish with you so you can find more resources, tips and recipes to help you enjoy seafood and reap its benefits.

In honor of #HyVeeFamilyMeals and Family Meals Month, we encourage you to check out these excellent one-pan ideas for delicious seafood.

From Dish on Fish:

Sheet pan + seafood = easy, breezy and delicious mealtime! One-pan seafood recipes are always popular, and for good reason. Their preparation is quick and the kitchen cleanup is a snap. Plus, the cooking method makes it easy to customize your seafood meals. Mix and match your spices and try adding different varieties of veggies – you might be surprised by how many assorted combinations you can create! Here are a few recipes to get you started:

Easy One Pan Roasted Shrimp and Veggies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One-Pan Salmon with Asparagus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheet Pan Garlic Butter Tilapia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Pan Roasted Mediterranean Cod

Responsible Choice Sea Scallop and Grilled Peach Salad with Lemon Basil Vinaigrette

Serves 4 (2 cups salad and 4 scallops each).

All you need:
For the vinaigrette:

  • 1/4 cup tarragon vinegar
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp Hy-Vee Dijon mustard
  • 3/4 cup Hy-Vee extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp basil chiffonade
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste

For the salad:

  • 4 peaches, halved and pitted
  • 16 sea scallops, patted dry
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 8 cups mixed greens, such as torn kale, Bibb lettuce, romaine or spinach
  • 2 carrots, shredded
  • Fresh basil, for garnish, optional

All you do:
For the vinaigrette:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar, lemon juice, sugar and mustard.
  2. Drizzle in olive oil while whisking to combine. Mix in basil and salt and black pepper, to taste. Set aside until ready to use.

For the salad:

  1. On a preheated grill, grill peaches 3 to 4 minutes or until slightly soft and grill marks appear.
  2. Season scallops with salt and pepper and grill about 2 minutes per side.
  3. Slice the peaches while the scallops cook.
  4. To serve the salad, toss greens and carrots together and place on a serving platter.
  5. Top with a little of the vinaigrette, grilled sea scallops and peaches.
  6. Drizzle with more vinaigrette and garnish with fresh basil, if desired.

**Chef’s note: Chiffonade means to shred or finely cut vegetables or herbs. To chiffonade, stack the basil leaves and tightly roll into a cylinder. Make thin slices to create ribbons. Don’t cut the basil too far ahead or it will blacken. This technique can be used for mint or any other leafy herb.

**Wine and beer pairing: I suggest a chilled Rose, such as Elk Creek Pinot Noir Dry Rose from California. I also suggest a Saison, such as Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale, made by Boulevard.

Alaska Pollock

Chances are you may have eaten Alaska pollock without even knowing it. That fish sandwich at your favorite restaurant or the imitation crab meat you put on your salad is likely made from Alaska pollock. Alaska pollock is often ranked as one of the top five seafood species consumed in the United States.

Alaska pollock has been the gold standard for sustainability for years. Since 2001, U.S. commercial landings of Alaska pollock have been well over 2.6 billion pounds each year on a sustainable basis. Pollock fishing has minimal impact on habitat. The fishery is a trawl fishery, meaning that large nets are pulled through the ocean above the ocean floor in an effort to avoid damaging the seabed. Pollock swim in giant schools well above the ocean floor. The pollock fishery is one of the cleanest fisheries in the world. Nearly 99 percent of the nets are filled with pollock, making for minimal by-catch.

I was lucky to be aboard a pollock trawler owned by Trident, one of Hy-Vee’s partners in sustainable Alaskan seafood.  The ship was the Island Enterprise. We visited with the captain and he showed us the sophisticated sonar and computer systems on board. All this equipment helps the trawler crew hone in on the pollock schools and helps them guide their nets to avoid bycatch. It also allows them to fish faster and more efficiently. The ship fished around the clock and only stopped to unload; we were lucky enough to catch it while it was in port for a few hours. This ship catches the fish and processes it onboard; the fish is frozen within hours of the catch.  When they are full they go to port, unload and go back out.

These efficiencies make it seem that the pollock don’t really have a chance, and the reality is they don’t.  If not for a strong commitment to sustainability, the pollock stocks could easily be wiped out by these large ships. But thanks to great management by the state of Alaska, these massive boats can pull in large amounts of fish year after year. Pollock is the most important fish that you probably didn’t know about! Maybe you’ve eaten it and never thought twice about it.

You can cook a raw piece of pollock like you would cod or haddock. You will be surprised at what great natural flavor it has. It’s delicious in fish tacos. And when you’re enjoying it, know you are eating a fish that is sustainably harvested in a way that preserves the species and the ocean it’s caught in.

Celebrate the Oceans This Greenpeace Day

 

 

On September 15, 1971, activists set sail (on “The Greenpeace”) to Amchitka Island off Alaska, to try to stop a U.S. nuclear weapons test. The activists’ audacious goal: sail into the restricted area to stop the weapons test.

“The Greenpeace” was intercepted by the U.S. Navy before it got close to the Amchitka testing site. While the crew failed to stop the nuclear test, their voyage sparked a flurry of public interest. Just five months later, the United States stopped the entire Amchitka nuclear test program. The island was later declared a bird sanctuary.

The crew were founders of Greenpeace. Forty-six years later, Greenpeace continues its mission as a global, independent environmental campaigning organization that confronts environmental problems and promotes green and peaceful solutions. Working in more than 40 countries and backed by nearly 3 million supporters worldwide, today Greenpeace continues its work to protect the world’s oceans.

From destructive industrial fishing to climate change and pollution — by 2050 scientists predict there could be more plastic in the oceans than fish! — the oceans need our help. That’s why Greenpeace works with governments, businesses, scientists and supporters to clean up the global seafood industry.

As a Greenpeace Oceans Campaigner, I engage supermarket chains, foodservice companies, and seafood brands that collectively have the power to advocate for improvements, protect seafood workers from human rights abuses, and ensure fish for the future.

In recent years, I’ve been pleased to see Hy-Vee significantly improve the sustainability of its seafood products. For example, Hy-Vee’s pole- and line-caught tuna is the most sustainable way to catch tuna, provides jobs for coastal fishing communities, and means that workers won’t be out at sea for months or years at a time — where egregious human rights abuses can occur.

On September 15, and every day, let’s work together for healthy, clean and plastic-free! oceans.

Here are three ways you can help:

Long-Term Health Benefits Shown from Eating Meals at Home as a Family

Regular family meals are linked to the kinds of outcomes we all want for our children: higher grades and self-esteem, healthier eating habits and weight, and less risky behavior. National Family Meals Month is a nationwide celebration designed to underscore the benefits of family meals. This September, both Hy-Vee and Seafood Nutrition Partnership are among the organizations accepting the challenge and encouraging all Americans to pledge to share one more meal at home per week with our families.

Numerous studies underscore the long-term health, academic and societal benefits of consistently eating together as a family. However, according to a 2013 Harris Poll, only 30 percent of American families share dinner every night. With all the demands of a busy, modern life, family mealtime is often among the first to be cut from schedules.

Making and eating dinner at home is one way families can stay connected and share their daily experiences together as a family while enjoying a nutritious meal. When you cook your own meals, you know what you’re putting into your food, which is often healthier. And if you get your kids involved in cooking, they feel proud of helping and are more likely to eat wholesome foods.

As the new school year begins, it’s important to remember fish is a delicious source of lean protein that is perfect for busy students – and their parents. Fish and shellfish supply the nutrients essential for strong bones, brain development, and healthy immune and cardiovascular systems. Eating seafood regularly can help increase energy, improve memory, and aid in sports performance.

SNP’s mission is to help Americans address preventable health issues through a balanced diet centered around seafood. We want families to know that seafood is tasty, healthy, fast and easy to prepare for dinner, with most dishes taking about 15 minutes to make. We offer several tips and ideas for cooking healthy, balanced meals at home.

Eat Your Fish!

Cod is the perfect way to get your foot in the boat with seafood. It lacks that particular “fishy” taste that many people find unappealing about seafood. So if you or someone you’re cooking for isn’t a big “fish” person and doesn’t like the smell or taste, this may be the fish to try!

Cod is an excellent mild fish that provides many benefits for your body, including being linked to the reduction of heart disease. (1, 2)

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish and are associated with a lower risk of stroke and keeping cholesterol under control, particularly by reducing LDL cholesterol, or the “bad” cholesterol. (1, 2)

Cod is also rich in vitamins B6 and B12, which keep the homocysteine levels low in our bodies. This is linked to reducing the risk of heart-related problems. (3)

If you suffer from sunburns during the sunny months, cod may help provide protection against those burns with its anti-inflammatory properties. It’s a natural sunscreen! (4)

Stop by your local Hy-Vee today and view our assortment of cod. A dietitian is around the corner if you have any questions about your cod or seafood purchase.

But there are still more fish in the sea to try! Once you get your feet wet with cod, you will be dying to move on to other varieties fish.

  1. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. 7 things to know about omega-3 fatty acids. US Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/omega. Updated September 24, 2015.
  2. American Heart Association. Fish and omega-3 fatty acids. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/HealthyDietGoals/Fish-and-Omega-3-Fatty-Acids_UCM_303248_Article.jsp#.V73B3ybQCUl. Updated June 15, 2015.
  3. National Institutes of Health. Vitamin B6 dietary supplement fact sheet. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB6-HealthProfessional/. Updated February 11, 2016.
  4. Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Belury MA, Porter K, Beversdorf DQ, Lemeshow S, Glaser R. Depressive symptoms, omega-6:omega-3 fatty acids, and inflammation in older adults. Psychosom Med. 2007 April; 69(3): 217-24.

Salmon Is In the Home Stretch

The annual Alaska salmon run is in the home stretch and the time to buy fresh Alaska salmon is nearing the finish line. Summer is a great time to enjoy the bounty of Alaskan salmon. The spring brings us Copper River sockeye and king salmon, June and July bring the bounty of Bristol Bay sockeye and late July and early August bring keta salmon to the table. So here we are in late August and the sockeye are harder to find and the keta have moved up the rivers.  So where does a fresh salmon aficionado turn to this time of year?  Coho salmon is the cure for your Alaska salmon addiction.

The coho is the late summer run that is worth the wait. Every salmon species has its unique traits and the Alaska coho is no different. Typically coho salmon can be caught from late June through early October, but the biggest commercial runs occur in mid-August and September. I remember catching coho on July 4 in Alaska, but they were just beginning to show up in the area at that time. Since it comes late in the summer, the coho helps fill the demand for Alaskan salmon as sockeye and keta end their runs.

Coho salmon are similar to king salmon in taste, color and texture. Coho can be distinguished by their orange red meat color. They are the second-largest salmon, behind just the king salmon, so they make excellent steaks and fillets. They have a relatively high fat content which makes them great for grilling and smoking. They are my second-favorite salmon next to the king.  You should start to see this outstanding fresh salmon at your local Hy-Vee. The end of summer also means we’re nearing the end of fresh salmon. Nothing compares to fresh Alaskan salmon, and this may be your last chance to get some before fall closes the door on the great Alaska salmon run.