Responsible Choice Sea Scallop and Grilled Peach Salad with Lemon Basil Vinaigrette

Serves 4 (2 cups salad and 4 scallops each).

All you need:
For the vinaigrette:

  • 1/4 cup tarragon vinegar
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp Hy-Vee Dijon mustard
  • 3/4 cup Hy-Vee extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp basil chiffonade
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste

For the salad:

  • 4 peaches, halved and pitted
  • 16 sea scallops, patted dry
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 8 cups mixed greens, such as torn kale, Bibb lettuce, romaine or spinach
  • 2 carrots, shredded
  • Fresh basil, for garnish, optional

All you do:
For the vinaigrette:

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together vinegar, lemon juice, sugar and mustard.
  2. Drizzle in olive oil while whisking to combine. Mix in basil and salt and black pepper, to taste. Set aside until ready to use.

For the salad:

  1. On a preheated grill, grill peaches 3 to 4 minutes or until slightly soft and grill marks appear.
  2. Season scallops with salt and pepper and grill about 2 minutes per side.
  3. Slice the peaches while the scallops cook.
  4. To serve the salad, toss greens and carrots together and place on a serving platter.
  5. Top with a little of the vinaigrette, grilled sea scallops and peaches.
  6. Drizzle with more vinaigrette and garnish with fresh basil, if desired.

**Chef’s note: Chiffonade means to shred or finely cut vegetables or herbs. To chiffonade, stack the basil leaves and tightly roll into a cylinder. Make thin slices to create ribbons. Don’t cut the basil too far ahead or it will blacken. This technique can be used for mint or any other leafy herb.

**Wine and beer pairing: I suggest a chilled Rose, such as Elk Creek Pinot Noir Dry Rose from California. I also suggest a Saison, such as Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale, made by Boulevard.

Alaska Pollock

Chances are you may have eaten Alaska pollock without even knowing it. That fish sandwich at your favorite restaurant or the imitation crab meat you put on your salad is likely made from Alaska pollock. Alaska pollock is often ranked as one of the top five seafood species consumed in the United States.

Alaska pollock has been the gold standard for sustainability for years. Since 2001, U.S. commercial landings of Alaska pollock have been well over 2.6 billion pounds each year on a sustainable basis. Pollock fishing has minimal impact on habitat. The fishery is a trawl fishery, meaning that large nets are pulled through the ocean above the ocean floor in an effort to avoid damaging the seabed. Pollock swim in giant schools well above the ocean floor. The pollock fishery is one of the cleanest fisheries in the world. Nearly 99 percent of the nets are filled with pollock, making for minimal by-catch.

I was lucky to be aboard a pollock trawler owned by Trident, one of Hy-Vee’s partners in sustainable Alaskan seafood.  The ship was the Island Enterprise. We visited with the captain and he showed us the sophisticated sonar and computer systems on board. All this equipment helps the trawler crew hone in on the pollock schools and helps them guide their nets to avoid bycatch. It also allows them to fish faster and more efficiently. The ship fished around the clock and only stopped to unload; we were lucky enough to catch it while it was in port for a few hours. This ship catches the fish and processes it onboard; the fish is frozen within hours of the catch.  When they are full they go to port, unload and go back out.

These efficiencies make it seem that the pollock don’t really have a chance, and the reality is they don’t.  If not for a strong commitment to sustainability, the pollock stocks could easily be wiped out by these large ships. But thanks to great management by the state of Alaska, these massive boats can pull in large amounts of fish year after year. Pollock is the most important fish that you probably didn’t know about! Maybe you’ve eaten it and never thought twice about it.

You can cook a raw piece of pollock like you would cod or haddock. You will be surprised at what great natural flavor it has. It’s delicious in fish tacos. And when you’re enjoying it, know you are eating a fish that is sustainably harvested in a way that preserves the species and the ocean it’s caught in.

Celebrate the Oceans This Greenpeace Day

 

 

On September 15, 1971, activists set sail (on “The Greenpeace”) to Amchitka Island off Alaska, to try to stop a U.S. nuclear weapons test. The activists’ audacious goal: sail into the restricted area to stop the weapons test.

“The Greenpeace” was intercepted by the U.S. Navy before it got close to the Amchitka testing site. While the crew failed to stop the nuclear test, their voyage sparked a flurry of public interest. Just five months later, the United States stopped the entire Amchitka nuclear test program. The island was later declared a bird sanctuary.

The crew were founders of Greenpeace. Forty-six years later, Greenpeace continues its mission as a global, independent environmental campaigning organization that confronts environmental problems and promotes green and peaceful solutions. Working in more than 40 countries and backed by nearly 3 million supporters worldwide, today Greenpeace continues its work to protect the world’s oceans.

From destructive industrial fishing to climate change and pollution — by 2050 scientists predict there could be more plastic in the oceans than fish! — the oceans need our help. That’s why Greenpeace works with governments, businesses, scientists and supporters to clean up the global seafood industry.

As a Greenpeace Oceans Campaigner, I engage supermarket chains, foodservice companies, and seafood brands that collectively have the power to advocate for improvements, protect seafood workers from human rights abuses, and ensure fish for the future.

In recent years, I’ve been pleased to see Hy-Vee significantly improve the sustainability of its seafood products. For example, Hy-Vee’s pole- and line-caught tuna is the most sustainable way to catch tuna, provides jobs for coastal fishing communities, and means that workers won’t be out at sea for months or years at a time — where egregious human rights abuses can occur.

On September 15, and every day, let’s work together for healthy, clean and plastic-free! oceans.

Here are three ways you can help:

Long-Term Health Benefits Shown from Eating Meals at Home as a Family

Regular family meals are linked to the kinds of outcomes we all want for our children: higher grades and self-esteem, healthier eating habits and weight, and less risky behavior. National Family Meals Month is a nationwide celebration designed to underscore the benefits of family meals. This September, both Hy-Vee and Seafood Nutrition Partnership are among the organizations accepting the challenge and encouraging all Americans to pledge to share one more meal at home per week with our families.

Numerous studies underscore the long-term health, academic and societal benefits of consistently eating together as a family. However, according to a 2013 Harris Poll, only 30 percent of American families share dinner every night. With all the demands of a busy, modern life, family mealtime is often among the first to be cut from schedules.

Making and eating dinner at home is one way families can stay connected and share their daily experiences together as a family while enjoying a nutritious meal. When you cook your own meals, you know what you’re putting into your food, which is often healthier. And if you get your kids involved in cooking, they feel proud of helping and are more likely to eat wholesome foods.

As the new school year begins, it’s important to remember fish is a delicious source of lean protein that is perfect for busy students – and their parents. Fish and shellfish supply the nutrients essential for strong bones, brain development, and healthy immune and cardiovascular systems. Eating seafood regularly can help increase energy, improve memory, and aid in sports performance.

SNP’s mission is to help Americans address preventable health issues through a balanced diet centered around seafood. We want families to know that seafood is tasty, healthy, fast and easy to prepare for dinner, with most dishes taking about 15 minutes to make. We offer several tips and ideas for cooking healthy, balanced meals at home.

Eat Your Fish!

Cod is the perfect way to get your foot in the boat with seafood. It lacks that particular “fishy” taste that many people find unappealing about seafood. So if you or someone you’re cooking for isn’t a big “fish” person and doesn’t like the smell or taste, this may be the fish to try!

Cod is an excellent mild fish that provides many benefits for your body, including being linked to the reduction of heart disease. (1, 2)

Omega-3 fatty acids are found in fish and are associated with a lower risk of stroke and keeping cholesterol under control, particularly by reducing LDL cholesterol, or the “bad” cholesterol. (1, 2)

Cod is also rich in vitamins B6 and B12, which keep the homocysteine levels low in our bodies. This is linked to reducing the risk of heart-related problems. (3)

If you suffer from sunburns during the sunny months, cod may help provide protection against those burns with its anti-inflammatory properties. It’s a natural sunscreen! (4)

Stop by your local Hy-Vee today and view our assortment of cod. A dietitian is around the corner if you have any questions about your cod or seafood purchase.

But there are still more fish in the sea to try! Once you get your feet wet with cod, you will be dying to move on to other varieties fish.

  1. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. 7 things to know about omega-3 fatty acids. US Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health. https://nccih.nih.gov/health/tips/omega. Updated September 24, 2015.
  2. American Heart Association. Fish and omega-3 fatty acids. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/HealthyDietGoals/Fish-and-Omega-3-Fatty-Acids_UCM_303248_Article.jsp#.V73B3ybQCUl. Updated June 15, 2015.
  3. National Institutes of Health. Vitamin B6 dietary supplement fact sheet. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB6-HealthProfessional/. Updated February 11, 2016.
  4. Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Belury MA, Porter K, Beversdorf DQ, Lemeshow S, Glaser R. Depressive symptoms, omega-6:omega-3 fatty acids, and inflammation in older adults. Psychosom Med. 2007 April; 69(3): 217-24.

Salmon Is In the Home Stretch

The annual Alaska salmon run is in the home stretch and the time to buy fresh Alaska salmon is nearing the finish line. Summer is a great time to enjoy the bounty of Alaskan salmon. The spring brings us Copper River sockeye and king salmon, June and July bring the bounty of Bristol Bay sockeye and late July and early August bring keta salmon to the table. So here we are in late August and the sockeye are harder to find and the keta have moved up the rivers.  So where does a fresh salmon aficionado turn to this time of year?  Coho salmon is the cure for your Alaska salmon addiction.

The coho is the late summer run that is worth the wait. Every salmon species has its unique traits and the Alaska coho is no different. Typically coho salmon can be caught from late June through early October, but the biggest commercial runs occur in mid-August and September. I remember catching coho on July 4 in Alaska, but they were just beginning to show up in the area at that time. Since it comes late in the summer, the coho helps fill the demand for Alaskan salmon as sockeye and keta end their runs.

Coho salmon are similar to king salmon in taste, color and texture. Coho can be distinguished by their orange red meat color. They are the second-largest salmon, behind just the king salmon, so they make excellent steaks and fillets. They have a relatively high fat content which makes them great for grilling and smoking. They are my second-favorite salmon next to the king.  You should start to see this outstanding fresh salmon at your local Hy-Vee. The end of summer also means we’re nearing the end of fresh salmon. Nothing compares to fresh Alaskan salmon, and this may be your last chance to get some before fall closes the door on the great Alaska salmon run.

Hy-Vee Offers 100 Percent Responsibly Sourced Fresh and Frozen Seafood in All Stores

Hy-Vee announced in August that 100 percent of its national brand frozen seafood is now responsibly sourced in compliance with its Seafood Procurement Policy. Hy-Vee is the first Midwest retailer to guarantee that 100 percent of the fresh and frozen seafood sold in its 244 stores comes from environmentally responsible sources. This builds on Hy-Vee’s announcement in December 2015 that 100 percent of its private label fresh and frozen seafood is responsibly sourced.

Hy-Vee’s Seafood Procurement Policy was created with guidance from Hy-Vee’s partner FishWise, a nonprofit sustainable seafood consultancy that partnered with the retailer in 2011. The policy defines responsible seafood as coming from sources that are rated Green or Yellow by the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program, certified to an environmental standard equivalent to these ratings, or sourced from credible, time-bound improvement projects. Since the policy’s inception in 2012, Hy-Vee has worked to transition more than
5 million pounds of seafood to environmentally responsible sources.

“At Hy-Vee, we take pride in our dedication to high-quality, environmentally and socially responsible seafood, and we are thrilled to be the first Midwest retailer to make this kind of commitment,” said Brett Bremser, executive vice president of perishables at Hy-Vee. “This achievement fulfills our promise to our customers to do the right thing, and we will keep working hard with our suppliers and partners to maintain this level of excellence moving forward.”

Hy-Vee and FishWise worked with suppliers of non-compliant national brand seafood products to implement sourcing improvement recommendations. In June 2017, the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) and Seafood Watch announced that two-, three-, and four-star Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP)-certified tilapia is at least equivalent to a Seafood Watch Yellow rating, bringing tilapia products previously unrated by Seafood Watch into compliance with Hy-Vee’s policy. The announcement was a result of a lengthy multi-stakeholder effort, in which Hy-Vee and FishWise participated, to strengthen the BAP tilapia standards.

“We are thrilled at Hy-Vee’s latest 100 percent achievement, and deeply appreciative of the hard work by Seafood Watch, GAA and other stakeholders to elevate BAP-certified tilapia to a level that meets Hy-Vee and other retailers’ responsible sourcing policies,” said Kathleen Mullen-Ley, project director at FishWise. “Hy-Vee continues to lead by example in sourcing responsibly, training seafood staff to be sustainability experts and educating customers on the environmental and social benefits of responsible seafood.”

Hy-Vee will continue to work with FishWise to monitor changes in sustainability ratings and certifications of its seafood products to ensure Hy-Vee maintains 100 percent compliance with its policy moving forward. In addition, Hy-Vee and FishWise are also working together to improve the environmental and social responsibility of the company’s shelf-stable tuna products.

From Shrimp Farm to Shelf

As a supplier and importer of frozen shrimp for Hy-Vee, I am familiar with the process involved in getting a bag of shrimp on the grocery shelf.  However, it takes a trip to the source to be reminded of the amazing process involved in growing and harvesting the shrimp in that bag.  I was fortunate to recently visit Thailand to see that process firsthand.

Along with our sourcing team, I recently visited the Surat Thani province of Thailand, which includes a large coastline on the Gulf of Thailand.  The lush landscape, mountains and expansive views of acres of water reminded me of some of the best tropical regions I have visited.

This province has proven to be a fertile area for shrimp farming for many years and includes a proud tradition of family-owned shrimp farms.  The farmers in this region regularly meet to share best practices for their farming techniques and to discuss advancements in the industry, such as third-party sustainability certification.  The farmers have been committed to encouraging high-quality and sustainable farming practices.

We met with many shrimp farmers in the region, including a farm owned and operated by a husband and wife.  The farmers proudly walked us through the various processes and farming techniques each use for their farms, and shared with us the challenges they have faced to maintain consistent and high-quality crops.  These farmers want their crops to be not just viable, but thriving.

The process begins with the shrimp growing in nursery ponds after they first hatch, which is the most sensitive time for the shrimp and when they have the highest risk of dying.  The farmers have worked over the years to develop techniques to improve the survival rate of shrimp during this phase, including covering the nursery ponds and monitoring the water temperature and pH with sophisticated devices.

After growing in the nursery pond for two weeks, the shrimp are transferred to the larger growing ponds, where they can grow for up to 120 days to sizes as large as 1.2 ounces per shrimp (13 to 15 shrimp per pound).  The rapid growth of these shrimp is aided by a circulating water system, multiple aerators, timed feedings to ensure the shrimp receive the necessary nutrition, and testing of the water quality throughout the growth process.

The farmers know that quality is key to their long-term viability, and quality begins with ensuring shrimp grow in the right conditions.  The farms we visited all have their farms audited and certified annually by the Global Aquaculture Alliance to ensure they are following Best Aquaculture Practices, which is the industry-leading standard for shrimp aquaculture.

When the shrimp are ready for harvesting, the manual process begins. It involves pulling nets through the pond several times and manually scooping up the shrimp with buckets.  The harvest of each pond can take up to 4 hours, and many farms have 50 or more ponds at each location.

Once harvested, the shrimp are first inspected and sorted at the farm for quality.  The shrimp are then iced and transported to the plant, where they are further inspected, peeled or cooked, frozen and packed into Hy-Vee’s retail bags.

With the worldwide demand for seafood growing and limited ocean resources to meet that growing demand, high-quality aquaculture is growing in importance.  The Surat Thani farmers are seeing this increased demand for their product, and are building more ponds and farms to meet this demand.

Seeing firsthand the best practices these farmers follow to ensure their shrimp meets and exceeds the quality expectations for Hy-Vee is always worth the effort and time, and renews my appreciation for the dedication to quality these farmers demonstrate.  Hy-Vee’s commitment to placing a quality product on the shelf truly begins with these farmers.

Hy-Vee EZ-Peel Shrimp Skewers

EZ Cajun Shrimp
Serves 4

All you need:

  • 1 pound Hy-Vee EZ peel shrimp
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 tbsp Cajun seasoning

All you do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Peel shrimp leaving tail attached and toss with olive oil and Cajun seasoning. Skewer shrimp and place on prepared baking sheet.
  3. Roast for 6-8 minutes, flipping once, cook until the shrimp are pink and just cooked through.

 

EZ Lemon Shrimp
Serves 4

All you need:

  • 1 pound Hy-Vee EZ peel shrimp
  • 1 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp Lemon Pepper seasoning
  • 1 tbsp dried parsley

All you do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Peel shrimp leaving tail attached and toss with oil, lemon juice, lemon pepper and parsley. Skewer shrimp and place on prepared baking sheet.
  3. Roast for 6-8 minutes, flipping once, cook until the shrimp are pink and just cooked through.

 

EZ Sesame Shrimp
Serves 4

All you need:

  • 1 pound Hy-Vee EZ peel shrimp
  • 1 tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp sesame seeds, divided
  • Black pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Peel shrimp leaving tail attached and toss with oil and soy sauce. Skewer shrimp and place on prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with 1 tablespoon sesame seeds.
  3. Roast for 6-8 minutes, flipping once and sprinkling with remaining sesame seeds, cook until the shrimp are pink and just cooked through. Season with black pepper if desired.

 

 

 

Recipe Spotlight: Grilled Mt. Cook Salmon with Chilled Quinoa Salad

All you need:

Quinoa Salad

  • 2 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 cup quinoa, rinsed
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint
  • 1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
  • 1 English cucumber, small diced
  • 1/4 cup sliced kalamata olives
  • 1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese
  • 1 tsp salt, or to taste
  • 1/4 tsp ground black pepper, or to taste

Grilled Salmon

  • 1 tbsp garlic olive oil
  • 4 (4 to 5 oz) each Responsible Choice Mt. Cook Salmon portions
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 (5 oz) clamshell mixed spring greens
  • 1 lemon, cut into wedges

All you do:

  1. For the quinoa salad, in a small saucepan, bring chicken broth to a boil. Add quinoa and cook over medium-high heat for 12 minutes or until all of the broth is absorbed. Remove from the heat, fluff and chill until cold.
  2. To the quinoa, add oil, lemon juice, onions, parsley, mint, tomatoes, cucumber, kalamata olives and feta; toss to combine. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
  3. For the salmon, prepare grill for medium-high heat. Rub garlic oil over salmon to coat and season with salt and pepper. Once grill is hot, brush grill rack with olive oil and immediately place salmon on grill.
  4. Cook for 4 minutes without lifting or turning salmon. This will help give salmon nice grill marks and make it easier to move. Turn it over and cook until salmon is just cooked through and all but the very center is opaque.
  5. To serve, divide spring mix among four plates. Place 1 cup of chilled quinoa salad on the greens and top with a piece of grilled salmon. Serve with lemon wedge.