Seafoodies

 

 

Recipe Spotlight: Versatile and Protein-Packed, Hy-Vee Features Responsible Choice Yellowfin Tuna Steaks with an Asian Flair

by Andrew Kintigh | Recipes | Leave a comment

If you’re looking for a heart-healthy alternative that has plenty of protein power, yellowfin tuna steaks are a great, low-fat option. Sourced from Soho Foods, LLC, the handline-caught and Monterey Bay Aquarium (MBA) Green-rated “Best Choice” tuna falls right in line with Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice initiative when it comes to traceability and quality.

Highly versatile and filling enough to replace beef or pork for a weekly meal, here is one of my favorite yellowfin tuna options:

Seared Yellowfin Tuna Steaks with Asian Slaw

Serves 4

All you need

For the yellowfin tuna steaks:

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 sesame-encrusted yellowfin tuna steaks

For the dressing:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil, divided
  • 3 tbsp minced ginger
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 2 tbsp brown sugar
  • 5 tbsp soy sauce
  • 4 tbsp mirin or white wine
  • 1 tsp sesame oil
  • 1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

For the slaw:

  • 1 cup thinly sliced Napa cabbage
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced red cabbage
  • 1 cup julienned carrots
  • 1/4 cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced bok choy
  • 1/2 cup bean sprouts
  • 1/2 cup julienned snap peas
  • 1/2 cup julienned green onions

All you do

  1. Place a thick-bottomed frying pan on medium-high heat, until very hot. Add 2 tablespoons oil, and sear the tuna steaks for about 2 minutes per side (medium-rare), or until desired doneness is reached. Remove tuna from the pan and chill until ready to serve.
  2. In a small saucepan,n add 2 tablespoons olive oil, ginger and garlic; sauté until lightly brown. Add brown sugar, soy sauce and mirin. Simmer for 5 minutes and remove from heat. When cool, whisk in remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil, sesame oil and rice wine vinegar; set aside.
  3. In a large bowl, combine all vegetables; slowly add enough dressing to lightly coat the slaw; season to taste with salt and pepper.
  4. To serve, slice tuna steaks on the bias, and plate each with equal amounts of slaw.

Certified, Individually-Selected and Fresh: Hy-Vee offers a Responsible Choice for Lobster

by John Rohrs | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

One of our most popular crustaceans, lobster has always been a hot, international commodity. And as trends in the Midwest turn to increased seafood consumption, 15 to 17 pounds per capita per year, at Hy-Vee, we believe it is our responsibility to provide the same quality and traceability for seafood as we do for all other commodities.

To honor this promise, Hy-Vee began our Responsible Choice seafood initiative. From there, steps to ensure traceability and sustainability fell into place for lobster when we began our partnership with Mazzetta Company to procure Tristan rock lobster.

Why Tristan rock lobster over other lobster fisheries? Located 1,500 miles to the southwest of Cape Town, South Africa, Tristan da Cuhna is known as the most isolated inhabited group of island on Earth. Fewer residents and businesses mean less pollution ends up in the ocean around the islands. In addition, the lobster fishery has longstanding credibility in the world of seafood. Established in 1948, the Tristan rock lobster fishery has been a champion for the environment and implemented numerous practices to ensure responsible fishing, quality control and sustainability.

In June 2011, the Tristan lobster fishery attained certification from the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) demonstrating the fishery is managed in a way that does not lead to overfishing, maintains the health and productivity of the wider marine ecosystem, and has an effective management system in place.

The entire certification process is complex, public and rigorous, including seven detailed steps. In fact, Tristan rock lobster is one of only eight fisheries in the world certified by MSC for lobster sales and distribution. From an assessment and stakeholder meetings to client and public review, certification is an admirable achievement and helps us rest assured that sustainability and traceability are priorities throughout the entire supply chain – from the catch to your plate.

In addition to the shore-based facilities, the Tristan rock lobster fishery harvests from neighboring islands of Gough, Nightingale and Inaccessible with a factory freezer vessel, utilizing a long line multi-trap method. All systems operate under a traceability system to track MSC certified seafood through processing as whole cooked frozen, whole raw frozen, whole raw frozen sashimi, raw frozen tails or raw frozen heads.

The final product is then transshipped to Cape Town prior to shipment to the USA.

In addition to the MSC approved practices, Tristan rock lobster has a quality taste, reflecting the care and standards utilized throughout the process. Carefully selected, quickly frozen and individually wrapped, Tristan lobster offers the same benefits available in most seafood – high in amino acids, potassium and magnesium, vitamins, calcium, iron and zinc.

Hy-Vee is proud to partner with an upstanding fishery that places the same value on food safety, traceability and environmental consciousness. Through the Responsible Choice seafood initiative, we are constantly looking for ways to improve our transparency and hold not only ourselves, but also our suppliers, accountable for the quality of product we offer.

Hy-Vee Sets a New Standard When It Comes to Local – Sourcing Hybrid Striped Bass and Barramundi from the Heartland

by John Rohrs | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

Authored by John Rohrs & Kathleen Mullen-Ley

In a country that imports over 90 percent of its seafood, it’s rare to find a restaurant or grocery store that sources its seafood locally. However, with Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood program, we are doing just that by achieving the highest standards, keeping a close eye on environmental stewardship and upholding accountability to our customers.

Regarding the fresh hybrid striped bass and barramundi in our case daily, the local story begins with a family-owned and operated company in Blairsburg, Iowa – Iowa’s First. Hy-Vee learned about the forward-thinking style of raising seafood inland and jumped at the opportunity to transition from international sources to a local partner. And the benefits are endless.

Encouraged by FishWise, our nonprofit sustainable seafood partner, to utilize land-based aquaculture systems, Hy-Vee is proud to partner with another environmentally conscious company as part of our Responsible Choice initiative. Land-based aquaculture systems mitigate or eliminate many of the negative impacts to the surrounding environment typical of traditional ocean-based aquaculture systems and minimize biosecurity risks.

Sourcing from a local, land-based fish farm also leads to exemplary traceability. In fact, in a land-based system, each fish is observed and handled with care from the farm to your plate. Ongoing efforts to improve the quality of product are constant. For example, this summer Iowa’s First implemented a new system of LED lighting to simulate sunrise and sunset times, which is key to improving feeding time and managing stress levels of the fish.

Iowa’s First utilizes a flow through system to remove waste properly that ensures the system remains clean without the use of antibiotics. This is done by using a series of tanks to warm and oxygenate water, which is then circulated through various filters to collect waste and convert the waste’s ammonia to nitrates. Any wastewater remaining is sent to a nearby lagoon and later used to irrigate fields near the facility.

In addition to the safe, local practices, hybrid striped bass and barramundi have received a “Best Choice” or Green Rating from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program and a ringing endorsement for health from Dr. Oz.

“Free of mercury, but full of heart–and brain–healthy omega-3s, barramundi is a shoe-in for one of my top 5 superfoods. Bonus: the white meat is light, flaky and delicious,” says Oz.

Hy-Vee’s partnership with Iowa’s First is a great opportunity for us to support local business and community, all while offering a safe, traceable product for our customers. We are proud to offer fresh, quality seafood and will continue to look for ways to improve these efforts.

Recipe Spotlight: Versatile Alaska Crab is Good in Light Summer-Time Fare & Hearty Fall Boils

by Andrew Kintigh | Recipes | Leave a comment

During the transition from summer to fall, what to eat can be as confusing as what to wear. Jacket or short sleeve shirt? Hearty soup or lighter fare?

Here are two recipes using Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Alaska crab to get you through the in-between season. One is light and fresh; the other is a hearty boil that uses of end-of-harvest sweet corn, potatoes and onions.


Alaskan Crab Lettuce Wraps

Makes 8 lettuce wraps.

All you need:

Dressing:

  • 1 tbsp diced shallot
  • Juice of 1/2 lemon
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp fresh cilantro, chopped
  • Sea salt and black pepper, to taste

Salad:

  • 1 pound cooked crab meat, diced
  • 1 avocado, pitted, peeled and diced
  • 1 mango, peeled and small diced
  • 2 stalks celery, small diced
  • 1/4 cup small diced red bell pepper
  • 2 green onions, chopped
  • 8 Bibb lettuce leaves from 1 head

All you do:

  1. Whisk shallot, lemon juice, lime juice, olive oil and cilantro together in a bowl. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  2. Combine crab meat, avocado, mango, celery, red bell pepper and green onions in another bowl.
  3. Pour just enough dressing over the salad ingredients to lightly coat. Toss gently.
  4. Place 2 tablespoons salad onto each lettuce leaf and roll in wraps. Serve immediately.

Louisiana Style Shrimp and Crab Boil

Serves 6 to 8.

All you need:

  • 4 gallons water
  • 2 heads garlic, unpeeled
  • 5 fresh bay leaves
  • 9 oz Zatarain’s dry crab boil
  • 2 tbsp Zatarain’s liquid shrimp and crab boil
  • 2 (12 oz each) bottles Baraboo Pale Ale
  • 2 large oranges, halved
  • 3 large lemons, halved
  • 1 1/2 pounds baby red potatoes, washed
  • 1 1/2 pounds baby Yukon gold potatoes, washed
  • 1 pound Andouille sausage, sliced on the bias every 2 inches
  • 15 (3-inch) sections fresh sweet corn
  • 2 large onions, sliced
  • 2 pounds crawfish, thawed
  • 1 pound Jonah crab claws, thawed
  • 1 pound Alaska king crab claws, thawed
  • 2 pounds Gulf shrimp, thawed
  • Sea salt and fresh cracked black pepper, to taste
  • Lemon wedges and cocktail sauce, for serving

All you do:

  1. Heat in a 10-gallon stockpot over high heat.
  2. Add garlic, bay leaves, dry crab boil, liquid crab boil, beer, oranges and lemons. Cover and bring to a boil.
  3. Add potatoes; cover and boil 10 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, cook sausage over medium heat about 5 minutes or until lightly browned. Add sausage, sweet corn and onions to stockpot; cover and boil for 5 minutes.
  5. Add crawfish, crab claws and shrimp; boil for 2 to 3 minutes or until shrimp are pink. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  6. Transfer all ingredients to an oversize platter or large baking sheet and serve with lemon wedges and cocktail sauce, if desired.

Clear Springs Rainbow Trout Sets the Industry Standard for Aquaculture

by Kathleen Mullen-Ley | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

As FishWise helps Hy-Vee develop the strategies necessary to meet its commitment to customers to responsibly source its fresh and frozen Hy-Vee fish and seafood by the end of 2015, we’ve come across some incredible sustainability success stories.

One of the best comes from Clear Springs Trout Farm. I met them at the Seafood Expo North America, formerly known as the Boston Seafood Show. That vendor in particular is doing a great job, and they produce a ton of fish. It’s domestic and not imported, and is produced fairly close to Hy-Vee stores, so it has a low carbon footprint compared to some other species.

Visiting one-on-one with vendors and forming the relationships that are so important in advancing the Responsible Choice policy, I had the chance to learn a little more about an operation that is truly a model for aquaculture – and produces some delicious trout.

The trout are farmed in land-based raceways with a closed containment system that has earned a Green “Best Choice” rating from the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program. There’s also no evidence of large-scale escapes, indicating the raceway systems are effective in containing farmed fish from wild trout populations. Disease risk to wild populations isn’t a major concern – though a lack of data suggests that it should be studied more.

The flow-through raceway system uses continuously flowing pristine spring water. The waste is managed very well. The raceways are designed so waste settles at the bottom and is easy to clean out, so it doesn’t end up going into any nearby bodies of water. The risk of pollution is low.

The feed is Yellow Rated by Seafood Watch because some fish oil and fish meal from wild fisheries are used, but it’s a relatively low amount.

Clear Springs Rainbow Trout is a fish people can feel good about eating because it’s such a model for other aquaculture species. I would encourage people to try it; it’s more robust than some fish, but good for someone with an adventurous palate. It has a delicate texture and is a good substitute for less sustainable species like haddock or snapper.

For some ideas on how to prepare this tasty fish, click here for two delicious rainbow trout recipes.

Recipe Spotlight: Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Rainbow Trout Stars in Cajun Seasonings, Lemon Caper Sauce

by Andrew Kintigh | Recipes | Leave a comment

One of my favorite Responsible Choice items in the Hy-Vee seafood case is Idaho rainbow trout from Clear Springs Foods – definitely the leaders in the industry for sustainable trout.

As part of our commitment to responsibly source all of our fresh and frozen Hy-Vee brand fish and seafood by the end of 2015, Clear Springs is the only rainbow trout supplier we’re featuring now.

Rainbow trout is low in fat, high in nutrients and is versatile, so it can be prepared many ways. Here are a couple of my favorites:


Cajun Rainbow Trout

All you need:

Cajun Seasoning

  • 2 tbsp Spanish paprika
  • 1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp dried thyme
  • 1 tsp dried oregano
  • 1 tsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 3/4 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper

Trout:

  • 4 (6 oz each) Responsible Choice rainbow trout fillets (1/2-inch thick)
  • 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tbsp Cajun seasoning
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 green onion, chopped
  • lemon wedges, as needed

All you do:

  1. For seasoning: mix all the ingredients together to create a spice rub, to be used in the preparation of the fish. The recipes makes enough seasoning for use a second time.
  2. Preheat the broiler.
  3. Pat fillets dry and lightly brush both sides with oil.
  4. Sprinkle both sides evenly with Cajun seasoning.
  5. Place skin-side-down on broiler rack.
  6. Broil 4 to 6 inches from heat for 4 to 5 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.
  7. Arrange on a platter; sprinkle with parsley and chopped green onion. Serve with lemon wedges.

Lemon Caper Rainbow Trout

All you need:

  • 2 (4 oz each) Responsible Choice rainbow trout fillets, skin removed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 tbsp whole butter
  • 1 tbsp capers, drained and roughly chopped
  • 1 tbsp chopped shallots
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 lemon

All you do:

  1. Heat a heavy pan over medium-high heat.
  2. Season fish on meat side with salt and pepper. Lightly dredge fish in flour and shake off excess.
  3. When pan is hot, add oil. Place fish in pan; keep moving pan to prevent the fish from sticking. Cook until a crust forms on meat. Carefully turn fish over and finish cooking. Remove and keep warm.
  4. To make the sauce, remove the oil from the pan, add 2 tablespoons butter and sauté the capers, shallots and garlic. Remove pan from the heat, add lemon juice and stir. Season with salt and pepper. Pour sauce over fish and serve.

Concerned About Where Your Food Comes From? So Are We. There’s No Need To Bypass Hy-Vee Select Private Label Tuna

by Mike Smith | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

Canned tuna has been part of Americans’ diets since the turn of the 20th century. But it didn’t really become a staple until years later when new fishing and dressing methods made it easier to catch a big, 40-pound tuna and remove excess oil that gave the fish a pungent odor that many people found objectionable.

After that, there was no curbing Americans’ appetite for tuna – until recently, that is.

From 1950 to 2000, tuna (mostly canned) was the most popular seafood in the United States. At the peak of its popularity, 85 percent of American households had at least one can of tuna in their cupboards. But last year, per capita consumption of tuna dropped to a 15-year low, according to USDA data and other studies cited recently by The Washington Post.

The article cites numerous reasons consumers are passing over canned tuna, most stemming from their growing awareness about how their food is raised and harvested. Consumer concerns range from overfishing to bycatch of other species, including the beloved dolphin.

At Hy-Vee, we share those concerns and have proactively addressed them with Hy-Vee Select Private Label Tuna, our overall commitment to sustainable seafood, and our Responsible Choice seafood initiative.

Our Select Private Label Tuna comes with a guarantee you won’t find with most major-label brands. Much of the canned tuna on the market today is caught using industrial scale purse seines and longlines, which result in high levels of bycatch of non-target species, such as dolphins, sharks, turtles and other marine life.

That was a big concern for Hy-Vee, so we looked to FishWise to help us develop two private-label canned tuna lines. Our new “Chunk Light” and “Solid or Chunk White” canned tunas are among the most progressive canned tuna offerings of any major retailer.

Our Chunk Light, which is pole and line-caught skipjack tuna, is especially impressive, given that the Monterey Bay Aquarium says it is the most sustainable option for any canned tuna.

The Solid or Chunk White is pole-and-troll caught albacore tuna (pole-and-troll are the two most selective albacore fishing methods), which results in very little bycatch.

The latter is also sourced from Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries in the United States and New Zealand. We are quite proud to offer both of these sustainably sourced canned tuna products which are big steps forward in our efforts to responsibly source all our fresh and private label seafood by the end of 2015.

So, consumers can reach for a package of Hy-Vee Select Private Label Tuna with the confidence of knowing that we’re as concerned as they are about the health of the world’s oceans and the species that depend on them for survival.

Recipe Highlight: Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Seafood for any Occasion

by Jessica Dolson | Recipes | Leave a comment

The following three recipes show how versatile Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood can be, whether you’re planning an intimate dinner party, snuggling up near a fire on a cool autumn night or planning a down-home party on the bayou.

Any of these dishes pair well with a dry white wine such as a buttery Chardonnay or Elk Grove Vineyards Pinot Noir Rose, 2013.


Herb-Panko Encrusted Baked Cod with Lemon Butter Sauce

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 4 (5 oz each) portions fresh or frozen cod fillets
  • 2 cups panko bread crumbs
  • 1 tbsp lemon pepper seasoning
  • 1 tbsp salt
  • 2 tbsp minced fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh parsley
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Dijon mustard, divided
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 (4 oz) stick unsalted butter, melted

All you do:

For the fish:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. Pat dry the fish fillets with a paper towel and set aside.
  3. Mix the panko, lemon pepper seasoning, salt, thyme and parsley together in a rimmed dish.
  4. Spread one-fourth of the mustard on top of each fish fillet, then dip the top of fish into panko mixture, pressing lightly to help it stick. Transfer the fish to the baking sheet.
  5. Bake for about 15 to 20 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

For the sauce:

  1. While fish is baking, place the lemon juice in a small saucepan on medium heat.
  2. Melt the butter separately.
  3. Slowly drizzle the melted butter, a little at a time, into the lemon juice while whisking until slightly thick.
  4. Serve with the fish.

For a side dish, try whole grain brown rice and crispy kale.


Seafood in Spicy Broth

All you need:

  • 1/4 cup Hy-Vee olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tsp dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup dry white wine, such as Secateurs Chenin Blanc 2012
  • 1 (28 oz) can diced tomatoes
  • 24 small littleneck clams (about 2 1/2 pounds total), scrubbed
  • 24 farmed mussels (about 1 1/2 pounds total), debearded
  • 20 Responsible Choice sea scallops, washed, dried and cut in half
  • 1/2 cup fresh torn basil leaves
  • French baguette from the Hy-Vee Bakery

All you do:

  1. Heat the oil in a heavy large pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic, bay leaf and crushed red pepper, Sauté until the garlic is fragrant, for 1 minute.
  3. Add the wine and bring to a boil.
  4. Add the tomatoes and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 5 minutes.
  5. Stir in the clams. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  6. Stir in the mussels. Cover and cook until the clams and mussels open, about 5 more minutes.
  7. Using tongs, transfer the opened shellfish equally to 4 serving bowls. Discard any shellfish that do not open.
  8. Add the scallops and basil to the simmering broth. Simmer for about 2 minutes.
  9. Discard the bay leaf. Divide the scallops and broth among the bowls and serve with warm bread.

Molly’s Blackened Catfish Recipe

This is one of those recipes that requires a little bit of prep work and some patience, but the wait and the work are definitely worth it. This is another example of how versatile this fish can be. Try this at your next feast for family or friends.

All you need:

  • 2 tbsp sweet paprika
  • 2 1/2 tbsp salt
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp lemon pepper
  • 1 tsp whole thyme leaves
  • 4 catfish fillets (total weight about 3 pounds)
  • 1/2 stick (2 oz) butter
  • 1/4 cup Hy-Vee olive oil

All you do:

  1. Mix paprika, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne pepper and lemon pepper together. This can be made ahead and stored in a lidded jar.
  2. Heat a black iron frying pan for at least 10 minutes over very high heat.
  3. Cut each of the fillets in half. Melt the butter and mix with the olive oil
  4. Place the spice mix on a plate.
  5. Dip the fish into the butter and oil and then dredge on both sides in the spice mix.
  6. Fry in a very hot pan just a few minutes on each side.

Source: Camp Cook

Sourcing Seafood from the Atlantic Illustrates Nuances of Hy-Vee’s Procurement Policy

by John Rohrs | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

Wrtten by John Rohrs & Kathleen Mullen-ley

Hy-Vee has made a strategic decision through its Responsible Choice seafood program to not regularly feature finfish from the Atlantic Ocean in its seafood counters – an example of the company’s commitment to responsible stewardship of the world’s oceans.

The sustainability of finfish stocks from the Atlantic Ocean is evaluated by the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s (MBA) Seafood Watch program. MBA uses a “traffic light” color rating system to assess the sustainability of species and make recommendations for seafood buyers, with a Green rating indicating a “best choice,” a Yellow rating indicating a “good alternative,” and a Red rating indicating consumers should “avoid.”

Some finfish species from the Atlantic Ocean are Yellow rated by MBA, meaning they are generally well managed. However, some species are Red rated, meaning that they are not being fished sustainably. There are even some finfish species that are Yellow rated in one region and Red rated in a different region due to differences in the type of gear used and in management effectiveness.

Two examples of species with both Yellow rated and Red rated sources are Atlantic cod and American lobster.

Atlantic cod is one of the best examples anywhere of the problems created by overfishing. There’s no denying cod was an important commodity in early American history, and one that helped New England develop. However, the cod fishing industry is one of the most famous examples of a fishery collapse. It takes a very long time for populations to come back – often decades – and some fisheries never rebound.

It’s good business to take a hands-off approach in overfished areas, and give stocks time to recover, and Hy-Vee is doing its part. The well-managed wild fisheries in Alaska and the Pacific are meeting Hy-Vee customers’ demands for the popular whitefish.

The Atlantic is an important source for most of Hy-Vee’s shellfish, including fresh American lobster.

The famous American lobster fisheries are doing very well right now, but sourcing demonstrates just how nuanced Hy-Vee’s procurement policies are. The Maine stock is doing very well (Yellow rated), but in southern New England, stocks are overfished (Red rated). So Hy-Vee is careful in its procurement, ensuring none of its lobster comes from regions pressured by overfishing.

Some of the best sustainability stories come from Green rated oyster, mussel and scallop fisheries. Oysters and mussels are cultured, growing in beds and on ropes, respectively, and are important soldiers in bay ecology efforts. Scallops are wild-caught in open and closed beds that are well-managed.

Blue crab, often called Chesapeake blue crab because of its importance to the region’s economy, environment and culture, is another success story. Blue crab populations are rebounding because of careful management of the fisheries with limits on commercial and recreational fisheries.

Demand for this tasty, versatile seafood is so great that Hy-Vee supplements its supply with blue crab from other countries. Overall, Hy-Vee’s approach to Atlantic seafood can be described as thoughtful and proactive, and the company will continue to shift its procurement practices to address fishing patterns, among other items.

Recipe Spotlight: Two Zesty Ways to Add More Heart-Healthy Responsible Choice Wild Alaska Salmon to Your Diet

by Jessica Dolson | Recipes | Leave a comment

Hy-Vee Responsible Choice salmon is still coming in fresh from Alaska. Here are some recipes that add variety as you include heart-healthy, Omega 3 fatty acid-rich salmon into your diet.

With any of these dishes, I would stick to a dry white wine such as a buttery Chardonnay, or Elk Grove Vineyards Pinot Noir Rose 2013.


Coconut Poached Wild Alaska Salmon with Minted Peas and Basmati Rice

Serves 4

All you need:

For the marinade:

  • 2 tbsp red or white wine vinegar
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric

For the salmon:

  • 4 (5 oz each) Responsible Choice skin-on salmon portions
  • 1 (14 oz) box Basmati boil-in-bag white rice (2 bags)
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2-inch piece fresh ginger, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 (14.5 oz) can coconut milk
  • 1 (12 oz) package steam-in-the-bag sugar snap peas
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. For the marinade: mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Rub over salmon pieces. Let sit for about 30 minutes at room temperature.
  2. Fill a stock pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add the rice and boil 8 to 10 minutes. When rice is done, remove to a serving dish and fluff with fork. Keep warm.
  3. In a high-sided sauté pan, melt the butter and olive oil together. Add ginger and garlic. Sauté for 1 minute. Add salmon skin-side-down. Crisp the skin a little bit, then flip over and add the coconut milk, just enough to come up halfway to the salmon. Simmer the salmon in the coconut milk until cooked through, 6 to 10 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, steam the snap peas in the microwave. Remove from package. Add mint and salt and pepper. Serve the salmon over the rice with the peas alongside.

Balsamic Glazed Wild Alaska Salmon

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 4 (5 oz each) Responsible Choice salmon portions
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Hy-Vee extra-virgin olive oil
  • Hy-Vee balsamic glaze

What you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Season salmon with a little salt and pepper. Place on a sheet pan. Drizzle with a little olive oil. Bake in oven for about 10 to 12 minutes.
  3. Glaze with balsamic. Serve with wild rice pilaf and fresh vegetables.
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