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Recipe Spotlight: Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Rainbow Trout Stars in Cajun Seasonings, Lemon Caper Sauce

by Andrew Kintigh | Recipes | Leave a comment

One of my favorite Responsible Choice items in the Hy-Vee seafood case is Idaho rainbow trout from Clear Springs Foods – definitely the leaders in the industry for sustainable trout.

As part of our commitment to responsibly source all of our fresh and frozen Hy-Vee brand fish and seafood by the end of 2015, Clear Springs is the only rainbow trout supplier we’re featuring now.

Rainbow trout is low in fat, high in nutrients and is versatile, so it can be prepared many ways. Here are a couple of my favorites:

Cajun Rainbow Trout

All You Need:

Cajun Seasoning

  • 2 tablespoons Spanish paprika
  • 1½ teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • ¾ teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Trout:

  • 4 (6-ounce each) Responsible Choice rainbow trout fillets (½-inch thick)
  • 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning (recipe below)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 green onion, chopped
  • lemon wedges, as needed

All You Do:

  1. For seasoning: mix all the ingredients together to create a spice rub, to be used in the preparation of the fish. The recipes makes enough seasoning for use a second time.
  2. Preheat the broiler.
  3. Pat fillets dry and lightly brush both sides with oil.
  4. Sprinkle both sides evenly with Cajun seasoning.
  5. Place skin-side-down on broiler rack.
  6. Broil 4-6 inches from heat for 4-5 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork.
  7. Arrange on a platter; sprinkle with parsley and chopped green onion. Serve with lemon wedges.

Lemon Caper Rainbow Trout

All You Need:

  • 2 (4-ounce each) Responsible Choice rainbow trout fillets, skin removed
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • ½ cup flour
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons whole butter
  • 1 tablespoon capers, drained and roughly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon chopped shallots
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 lemon

All You Do:

  1. Heat a heavy pan over medium-high heat.
  2. Season fish on meat side with salt and pepper. Lightly dredge fish in flour and shake off excess.
  3. When pan is hot, add oil. Place fish in pan; keep moving pan to prevent the fish from sticking. Cook until a crust forms on meat. Carefully turn fish over and finish cooking. Remove and keep warm.
  4. To make the sauce, remove the oil from the pan, add 2 tablespoons butter and sauté the capers, shallots and garlic. Remove pan from the heat, add lemon juice and stir. Season with salt and pepper. Pour sauce over fish and serve.

Concerned About Where Your Food Comes From? So Are We. There’s No Need To Bypass Hy-Vee Select Private Label Tuna

by Mike Smith | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

Canned tuna has been part of Americans’ diets since the turn of the 20th century. But it didn’t really become a staple until years later when new fishing and dressing methods made it easier to catch a big, 40-pound tuna and remove excess oil that gave the fish a pungent odor that many people found objectionable.

After that, there was no curbing Americans’ appetite for tuna – until recently, that is.

From 1950 to 2000, tuna (mostly canned) was the most popular seafood in the United States. At the peak of its popularity, 85 percent of American households had at least one can of tuna in their cupboards. But last year, per capita consumption of tuna dropped to a 15-year low, according to USDA data and other studies cited recently by The Washington Post.

The article cites numerous reasons consumers are passing over canned tuna, most stemming from their growing awareness about how their food is raised and harvested. Consumer concerns range from overfishing to bycatch of other species, including the beloved dolphin.

At Hy-Vee, we share those concerns and have proactively addressed them with Hy-Vee Select Private Label Tuna, our overall commitment to sustainable seafood, and our Responsible Choice seafood initiative.

Our Select Private Label Tuna comes with a guarantee you won’t find with most major-label brands. Much of the canned tuna on the market today is caught using industrial scale purse seines and longlines, which result in high levels of bycatch of non-target species, such as dolphins, sharks, turtles and other marine life.

That was a big concern for Hy-Vee, so we looked to FishWise to help us develop two private-label canned tuna lines. Our new “Chunk Light” and “Solid or Chunk White” canned tunas are among the most progressive canned tuna offerings of any major retailer.

Our Chunk Light, which is pole and line-caught skipjack tuna, is especially impressive, given that the Monterey Bay Aquarium says it is the most sustainable option for any canned tuna.

The Solid or Chunk White is pole-and-troll caught albacore tuna (pole-and-troll are the two most selective albacore fishing methods), which results in very little bycatch.

The latter is also sourced from Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries in the United States and New Zealand. We are quite proud to offer both of these sustainably sourced canned tuna products which are big steps forward in our efforts to responsibly source all our fresh and private label seafood by the end of 2015.

So, consumers can reach for a package of Hy-Vee Select Private Label Tuna with the confidence of knowing that we’re as concerned as they are about the health of the world’s oceans and the species that depend on them for survival.

Recipe Highlight: Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Seafood for any Occasion

by Jessica Dolson | Recipes | Leave a comment

The following three recipes show how versatile Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood can be, whether you’re planning an intimate dinner party, snuggling up near a fire on a cool autumn night or planning a down-home party on the bayou.

Any of these dishes pair well with a dry white wine such as a buttery Chardonnay or Elk Grove Vineyards Pinot Noir Rose, 2013.


Herb-Panko Encrusted Baked Cod with Lemon Butter Sauce

(Serves 4)

All you need:

  • 4 (5-ounce each) portions fresh or frozen cod fillets
  • 2 cups panko bread crumbs
  • 1 tablespoon lemon pepper seasoning
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley
  • 1½ tablespoons Dijon mustard, divided
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 1 (4 oz.) stick unsalted butter, melted

All you do:

For the fish:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray.
  3. Pat dry the fish fillets with a paper towel and set aside.
  4. Mix the panko, lemon pepper seasoning, salt, thyme and parsley together in a rimmed dish.
  5. Spread one-fourth of the mustard on top of each fish fillet, then dip the top of fish into panko mixture, pressing lightly to help it stick. Transfer the fish to the baking sheet.
  6. Bake for about 15-20 minutes or until fish flakes easily with a fork.

For the sauce:

  1. While fish is baking, place the lemon juice in a small saucepan on medium heat.
  2. Melt the butter separately.
  3. Slowly drizzle the melted butter, a little at a time, into the lemon juice while whisking until slightly thick.
  4. Serve with the fish.

For a side dish, try whole grain brown rice and crispy kale.


Seafood in Spicy Broth

All you need:

  • ¼ cup Hy-Vee olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper
  • 1 cup dry white wine, such as Secateurs Chenin Blanc 2012
  • 1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes
  • 24 small littleneck clams (about 2½ pounds total), scrubbed
  • 24 farmed mussels (about 1½ pounds total), debearded
  • 20 Responsible Choice sea scallops, washed, dried and cut in half
  • ½ cup fresh torn basil leaves
  • French baguette, from the Hy-Vee Bakery

All you do:

  1. Heat the oil in a heavy large pot over medium heat.
  2. Add the garlic, bay leaf and crushed red pepper, Sauté until the garlic is fragrant, for 1 minute.
  3. Add the wine and bring to a boil.
  4. Add the tomatoes and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the tomatoes begin to break down, about 5 minutes.
  5. Stir in the clams. Cover and cook for 5 minutes.
  6. Stir in the mussels. Cover and cook until the clams and mussels open, about 5 more minutes.
  7. Using tongs, transfer the opened shellfish equally to 4 serving bowls. Discard any shellfish that do not open.
  8. Add the scallops and basil to the simmering broth. Simmer for about 2 minutes.
  9. Discard the bay leaf. Divide the scallops and broth among the bowls and serve with warm bread.

Molly’s Blackened Catfish Recipe

Source: Camp Cook

This is one of those recipes that requires a little bit of prep work and some patience, but the wait and the work are definitely worth it. This is another example of how versatile this fish can be. Try this at your next feast for family or friends.

All you need:

  • 2 tablespoons sweet paprika
  • 2½ tablespoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1½ teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1½ teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 2 teaspoons lemon pepper
  • 1 teaspoon whole thyme leaves
  • 4 catfish fillets (total weight about 3 pounds)
  • ½ stick (2 oz.) butter
  • ¼ cup Hy-Vee olive oil

All you do:

  1. Mix paprika, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne pepper and lemon pepper together. This can be made ahead and stored in a lidded jar.
  2. Heat a black iron frying pan for at least 10 minutes over very high heat.
  3. Cut each of the fillets in half. Melt the butter and mix with the olive oil
  4. Place the spice mix on a plate.
  5. Dip the fish into the butter and oil and then dredge on both sides in the spice mix.
  6. Fry in a very hot pan just a few minutes on each side.

Sourcing Seafood from the Atlantic Illustrates Nuances of Hy-Vee’s Procurement Policy

by John Rohrs | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

Wrtten by John Rohrs & Kathleen Mullen-ley

Hy-Vee has made a strategic decision through its Responsible Choice seafood program to not regularly feature finfish from the Atlantic Ocean in its seafood counters – an example of the company’s commitment to responsible stewardship of the world’s oceans.

The sustainability of finfish stocks from the Atlantic Ocean is evaluated by the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s (MBA) Seafood Watch program. MBA uses a “traffic light” color rating system to assess the sustainability of species and make recommendations for seafood buyers, with a Green rating indicating a “best choice,” a Yellow rating indicating a “good alternative,” and a Red rating indicating consumers should “avoid.”

Some finfish species from the Atlantic Ocean are Yellow rated by MBA, meaning they are generally well managed. However, some species are Red rated, meaning that they are not being fished sustainably. There are even some finfish species that are Yellow rated in one region and Red rated in a different region due to differences in the type of gear used and in management effectiveness.

Two examples of species with both Yellow rated and Red rated sources are Atlantic cod and American lobster.

Atlantic cod is one of the best examples anywhere of the problems created by overfishing. There’s no denying cod was an important commodity in early American history, and one that helped New England develop. However, the cod fishing industry is one of the most famous examples of a fishery collapse. It takes a very long time for populations to come back – often decades – and some fisheries never rebound.

It’s good business to take a hands-off approach in overfished areas, and give stocks time to recover, and Hy-Vee is doing its part. The well-managed wild fisheries in Alaska and the Pacific are meeting Hy-Vee customers’ demands for the popular whitefish.

The Atlantic is an important source for most of Hy-Vee’s shellfish, including fresh American lobster.

The famous American lobster fisheries are doing very well right now, but sourcing demonstrates just how nuanced Hy-Vee’s procurement policies are. The Maine stock is doing very well (Yellow rated), but in southern New England, stocks are overfished (Red rated). So Hy-Vee is careful in its procurement, ensuring none of its lobster comes from regions pressured by overfishing.

Some of the best sustainability stories come from Green rated oyster, mussel and scallop fisheries. Oysters and mussels are cultured, growing in beds and on ropes, respectively, and are important soldiers in bay ecology efforts. Scallops are wild-caught in open and closed beds that are well-managed.

Blue crab, often called Chesapeake blue crab because of its importance to the region’s economy, environment and culture, is another success story. Blue crab populations are rebounding because of careful management of the fisheries with limits on commercial and recreational fisheries.

Demand for this tasty, versatile seafood is so great that Hy-Vee supplements its supply with blue crab from other countries. Overall, Hy-Vee’s approach to Atlantic seafood can be described as thoughtful and proactive, and the company will continue to shift its procurement practices to address fishing patterns, among other items.

Recipe Spotlight: Two Zesty Ways to Add More Heart-Healthy Responsible Choice Wild Alaska Salmon to Your Diet

by Jessica Dolson | Recipes | Leave a comment

Hy-Vee Responsible Choice salmon is still coming in fresh from Alaska. Here are some recipes that add variety as you include heart-healthy, Omega 3 fatty acid-rich salmon into your diet.

With any of these dishes, I would stick to a dry white wine such as a buttery Chardonnay, or Elk Grove Vineyards Pinot Noir Rose 2013.


Coconut Poached Wild Alaska Salmon with Minted Peas and Basmati Rice

Serves 4

All you need:

For the marinade:

  • 2 tbsp red or white wine vinegar
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1/4 tsp turmeric

For the salmon:

  • 4 (5 oz each) Responsible Choice skin-on salmon portions
  • 1 (14 oz) box Basmati boil-in-bag white rice (2 bags)
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2-inch piece fresh ginger, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 (14.5 oz) can coconut milk
  • 1 (12 oz) package steam-in-the-bag sugar snap peas
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh mint
  • Salt and pepper, to taste

All you do:

  1. For the marinade: mix all ingredients in a small bowl. Rub over salmon pieces. Let sit for about 30 minutes at room temperature.
  2. Fill a stock pot with water. Bring to a boil. Add the rice and boil 8 to 10 minutes. When rice is done, remove to a serving dish and fluff with fork. Keep warm.
  3. In a high-sided sauté pan, melt the butter and olive oil together. Add ginger and garlic. Sauté for 1 minute. Add salmon skin-side-down. Crisp the skin a little bit, then flip over and add the coconut milk, just enough to come up halfway to the salmon. Simmer the salmon in the coconut milk until cooked through, 6 to 10 minutes.
  4. In the meantime, steam the snap peas in the microwave. Remove from package. Add mint and salt and pepper. Serve the salmon over the rice with the peas alongside.

Balsamic Glazed Wild Alaska Salmon

Serves 4

All you need:

  • 4 (5 oz each) Responsible Choice salmon portions
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Hy-Vee extra-virgin olive oil
  • Hy-Vee balsamic glaze

What you do:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Season salmon with a little salt and pepper. Place on a sheet pan. Drizzle with a little olive oil. Bake in oven for about 10 to 12 minutes.
  3. Glaze with balsamic. Serve with wild rice pilaf and fresh vegetables.

Supplier Spotlight: Belize Shrimp is the Perfect Combination of Responsible Choice and Delicious

by John Rohrs | Our Seafood | Leave a comment

As this blog can attest, we at Hy-Vee are serious about promoting healthy oceans and ensuring the long-term viability of the seafood supply—both in the United States and abroad. As a part of this commitment and our Responsible Choice initiative, we are excited to introduce Belize shrimp to our customers and into our seafood cases.

Produced by Belize Aquaculture Ltd. from one of the most environmentally advanced eco-aquaculture systems in the world, this white leg shrimp is farmed in ponds that contain water pumped daily from the Caribbean Sea—making it famously known as being “fresh out of the water.” The physical location and the production method provide the ideal environment for shrimp farming – perfect weather, rich coastlines and nutritious water.

Fisheries and farms around the globe are facing challenges in creating and implementing sustainable practices and environments. Belize and Belize Aquaculture Ltd. are ahead of the curve in properly managing their shrimp and their production environment. Belize Aquaculture is a “Best Aquaculture Practices” or “BAP” 3 star, which is one step from the highest rating. This has been achieved in part thanks to advanced education and training, and has helped to raise the industry standards in minimizing the impact on coastal waters and wildlife. Education also helps farmers to keep the shrimp robust and pure while producing less waste and contamination.

Now, let’s talk about the delicious, savory taste of these shrimp. Because these shrimp are raised on a special diet, they are uniquely sweet and succulent. They have a firm bite, giving many customers the shrimp flavor profile they desire. Due to Belize Aquaculture Ltd.’s practices, there are no additives or preservatives, no antibiotics, no hormones and no chemicals used in the production of this shrimp. In addition, the processing facility is a mere 10 minutes away from the farm—much closer than the industry standard of four to 12 hours. The combination of the production and processing standards means that you won’t find anything more natural or fresh than this shrimp.

And, it’s easy to prepare in a variety of ways. Boil it, sauté it or grill it and serve with classic cocktail sauce, or use Old Bay seasoning and butter for a little extra flavoring. Due to the freshness and quick processing time, this shrimp cooks in half the time as normal shrimp which helps on those busy summer nights when dinner needs to be made quickly. Be aware of the vibrant and dark red coloring the shrimp will possess when ready; it’s imperative to not overcook them. Our seafood counter experts or in-store chefs will be able to provide you with cooking suggestions and a recipe if you’d like, but no matter how you prepare them you can be confident that you are dining on one of the world’s best-tasting shrimp.

Recipe Spotlight: Feature Responsible Choice Seafood at Your End-of-the-Summer Blowout

by Andrew Kintigh | Recipes | Leave a comment

Summer is slipping away and soon the kids will be back in school or leaving to return to their college dorms.

If you want to close out the season with a luau or other end-of-summer party, this is a good and quick recipe featuring Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice seafood.

It starts with Belize shrimp, but you can also switch out the shrimp and marinate fresh mahi mahi as well.


Coconut Lime Belize Shrimp Skewers

All you need:

  • 1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tbsp freshly grated lime zest
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice
  • 1 (14 oz) can coconut milk
  • 2 pounds Responsible Choice Belize shrimp (31- to 40-ct), peeled and deveined
  • 12 to 14 long wooden skewers
  • 1/4 tsp kosher salt
  • fresh lime wedges, for squeezing and garnish
  • 1/2 cup toasted, sweetened shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves

All you do:

  1. In a medium bowl, combine ginger, garlic, lime zest and juice, and coconut milk. Add shrimp, tossing to coat, and chill, covered, for 1 to 3 hours.
  2. Meanwhile, soak skewers in water. Prepare a grill for high heat (450 to 550 degrees; you can hold your hand 5 inches above cooking grate only 2 to 4 seconds). Push 5 shrimp onto each skewer; cook, turning once, until flesh has just turned pink and is slightly charred, about 3 minutes on each side.
  3. Arrange skewers on a serving platter and sprinkle evenly with salt, a squeeze of lime juice, coconut and cilantro leaves. Serve with extra lime wedges on the side.

Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice Seafood Species Come from the U.S. Side of the Gulf of Mexico, Where Fisheries are Well Managed

by John Rohrs | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

John Rohrs here:

When Hy-Vee customers buy Responsible Choice seafood from the Gulf of Mexico, it’s predominantly from the U.S. side, where fisheries maintain quota systems and meet Monterey Bay Aquarium’s criterion for management.

One of the biggest factors affecting fin fish from the Gulf is sport fishing. Sportsmen and women are required to buy licenses, but it still has a huge effect on stocks. Between a combination of commercial fishing and recreational fishing, there is a great pressure on fin fish.

Some of the species customers will get from the Gulf include fish from the grouper family. We also bring in some American red snapper, but years of overfishing – it’s also one of the top species for sport fishing – make it a work in progress. It’s a long-living, late-maturing fish, so it will take time for stocks to rebound.

Kathleen Mullen-Ley here:

Hy-Vee’s wild shrimp also comes from Gulf of Mexico and meets the commitment to responsibly source all seafood by the end of 2015 because the species is in a comprehensive fishery improvement project.

Here’s the problem:
Many commercial fishing boats are complying with federal law that requires the use of turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in federal and state waters, but Louisiana has a state law that prohibits enforcement of the federal law.

All of the shrimp caught in the Gulf is processed together, meaning the shrimp caught in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi and Florida is commingled with the shrimp caught in Louisiana. So because that Louisiana law is on the books, we can’t say Gulf wild shrimp is Responsible Choice, even though many fisheries are using TEDs.

Legislative efforts are continuing to bring everyone into compliance and end the political power struggle.

Recipe Spotlight: Hy-Vee Responsible Choice Shrimp Tacos with Corn Salsa

by Stacey Wertzberger | Recipes | Leave a comment

Sweet corn and summer are synonymous. It’s in such abundance this year that you’ve probably boiled it, microwaved it and grilled it.

If you and your family are looking for a way to enjoy the iconic taste of summer and Hy-Vee Responsible Choice seafood, this recipe gets you to your goal.

It is a simple and refreshing recipe that brings out the fresh taste of sweet corn, and some of summer’s other garden bounties. This would be a great recipe if you have any sweet corn left over from a grill-out the night before.

These tacos are not spicy, but the shrimp have some nice bold flavors to contrast with the simple fresh ingredients of the salsa.


Shrimp Tacos with Corn Salsa

Serves 4.

All you need:

Corn Salsa

  • 2 ears sweet corn
  • 1/2 cup diced red pepper
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced green onion
  • 1/2 avocado, peeled, pitted, diced
  • 1 tbsp lime juice
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin

Shrimp Tacos

  • 1 pound raw Hy-Vee Responsible Choice shrimp (16- to 20-count)
  • 1 tbsp agave nectar
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1/2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp chili powder
  • 1/4 tsp cumin
  • 8 flour taco shells

All you do:

  1. To cook the corn, place in boiling water for 5 to 7 minutes. Cool; cut the kernels from the cob. To prepare the salsa, place the corn, red pepper, green onion, avocado, lime juice, salt, black pepper and cumin in a medium bowl and mix until all incorporated. Set aside in refrigerator.
  2. To prepare the shrimp, thaw, peel and devein shrimp. In a large skillet add the shrimp, agave nectar, paprika, salt, chili powder and cumin; stir to evenly distribute seasonings. Cook shrimp for about 1 to 3 minutes on each side, until shrimp is opaque. Remove from heat.
  3. To prepare the taco, place 3 to 4 shrimp on each taco shell. Add about 1/4 cup corn salsa on top.

With its Responsible Choice Initiative and Fishery Improvement Projects, Hy-Vee is Raising the Bar

by Kathleen Mullen-Ley | Our Efforts | Leave a comment

One of the key goals of Hy-Vee’s Responsible Choice initiative is to help the seafood industry improve and help those fisheries and farms that are not performing at sustainable levels improve in discrete ways. To promote healthy oceans and ensure a long-term seafood supply, Hy-Vee is continuing to encourage its seafood suppliers to participate in fishery improvement projects (FIPs).

FIPs are an important component of Hy-Vee’s Seafood Procurement Policy as they provide a direct pathway for Hy-Vee to encourage improvements on the water, be that through strengthening fisheries management policies or by providing incentives for fishers to reduce the environmental impacts of their fishing gear.

What that means to the consumer is that though products from these fisheries may not currently meet the definition of “responsibly sourced” and be eligible for the Responsible Choice label, they still meet Hy-Vee’s 2015 Responsible Sourcing Commitment because they are in a “time-bound improvement process.”

These improvements may range from an internal agreement between FishWise and Hy-Vee about a particular seafood sourcing strategy, particularly for aquaculture, to external, multi-stakeholder efforts to improve a fishery, such as a fishery improvement project. In general, for an improvement project to meet Hy-Vee’s 2015 Commitment it must contain:

  • A time-bound component that establishes a clear objective consistent with the Seafood Procurement Policy
  • A work-plan with measurable indicators
  • A date by which the necessary improvements are to be achieved
  • Fishery improvement projects must meet the Guidelines for Supporting Improvement Projects established by the Conservation Alliance for Seafood Solutions (available here)

The important takeaway for consumers is that Hy-Vee is doing important work on the water, whether encouraging fisheries to use different gear or implement new management plans that will move them toward sustainability.

It’s important to support those fisheries that are already doing a good job, but it’s just as important to work with those that are struggling to improve through FIPs. This is an important way that retailers can drive improvement. Without support from retailers, they don’t have the motivation to improve.

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